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February 09, 1968 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11968-ISRAEL'S 20th
ANNIVERSARY YEAR

Special Israel Travel Section

Pages 23 to 27

JEWISH NEWS

Ludicrous
Hussein Role:
Obstacles to
Unhindered

r=1-1-mc..)u-r
A Weekly Review

Freeways

Editorial
Page 4

f■./1I 1--IIGA. f■ .I

of Jewish Events

'The Sun Stood

Still'— Impressive

Volume on June

Six-Day War

Commentary
Page 2

Michigan's Only English-Jewish Newspaper — Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle

Vol. LI I, No. 21

27

17100 W. 7 Mile Rd., Detroit —VE 8-9364—February 9, 1968

$6.00 Per Year, This Issue 20c

Religious Bias in Employment
Barred in Government Warning

`Unaligned' States Insist
Upon Israel Withdrawal

LONDON (JTA)—British diplomatic circles indicated here
Monday that they expected a new campaign by the so-called
unaligned states in the United Nations to revive a formula for
peace in the Middle East which was rejected in UN debate last
spring. The formula, in its baldest terms, would require Israel
to withdraw to its pie-June borders in exchange for an Arab
declaration of non-belligerency and a Big Power guarantee of
Israel's security.
President Josef Broz Tito of Yugoslavia, taking the initia-
tive in pressing this solution, raised it in recent weeks during
his extensive travels with the heads of regimes in India, Paki-
stan, Afghanistan, Cambodia, South Yemen and Ethiopia. In
talks with Emperor Haile Sellassie, Tito arrived at a formula
coupling Israeli withdrawal with a declaration of "the right to
independent existence of all countries in the region."
According to the Guardian, President Nasser of Egypt is
enthusiastically backing Tito's initiative, The paper said that
"Nasser clearly believes that the Suez Canal shootings of last
Tuesday have greatly strengthened his chances of obtaining a
settlement." It said that Egypt has been "lobbying intensively"
for international support on the canal issue and to make Israel
the scapegoat for the failure to release the 15 merchant ships
blocked in the canal.
The British government indicated it still entertains hopes
that the 15 merchant ships stranded in the Suez Canal since last
June will be freed. Goronwy Roberts, joint minister of state,
said this in a written reply to a question in the House of

Commons.

(Continued on Page 18)

Tourist Taxes Would
Affect Israel Travel

WASHINGTON (JTA)—The adminis-
tration asked Congress to tax American
tourists who spend more than $7 a day
on visits abroad to various lands, includ-
ing Israel. The tax is aimed mainly at
European and Mediterranean travel but
will be applied to all countries outside
the Western Hemisphere.

Treasury Secretary Henry Fowler told
the House Ways and Means Committee
that the tax should be approved by Con-
gress in time to inhibit travel this
spring. It was pointed out that students
would, in effect, be exempted because
student hostels and modest food cost less
than $7 daily. Persons spending from 87
to $15 a day would be taxed 15 per cent.

Rep. Seymour Halpern of New York.
a member of the House International
Finance Subcommittee, criticized the
administration's proposals for a tax on
tourism on the grounds that a travel
tax, "in effect, is a slap in the face to
Israel in view of that nation's arrange.
ments to honor her 20th anniversary of
independence with many tourist fea-
tures."
NEW YORK (JTA)—Agudath Israel
of America asked President Johnson
Wednesday to exclude from the adminis-
tration's proposed travel restrictions
those Americans who travel to the Holy
Land to visit religious shrines.

WASHINGTON (JTA) — Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz served notice Monday on
United States government contractors that job discrimination on the basis of religion is equally
a violation of government policy as discrimination on grounds of race, color or ethnic origin. A
directive published in the Federal Register addressed to all federal agencies handling questions
of contract compliance reminded them that Executive Order 11246 prohibited religious discrimi-
nation in employment on federal jobs and made the Office of Federal Contract Compliance
responsible for enforcing the ban.
Secretary Wirtz's memorandum pointed out that "although government contractors have
made progress in affording employment opportunities without regard to religion, there remain
industries and companies in which some religious groups, notably Jews, and to some extent
Catholics, are still excluded from positions at certain levels of responsibility. Where this appears
to be the case, government contractors are expected to identify the problems and institute
appropriate affirmative actions to obtain results."
President Morris B. Abram of the American Jewish Committee expressed gratification
over the labor secretary's action and praised Wirtz, who he said, "has shown great sensitivity
to this issue, particularly as it relates to the increasing shortage of management manpower."
The Wirtz directive was described as "the concluding step" in efforts launched two years ago
by the AJC when it filed a complaint with the secretary of labor of discrimination against Jews
and Catholics on management levels.

ADL Protests Bias at New York Athletic Club

NEW YORK (JTA) — The Anti-Defamation League of Bnai Brith joined with two Negro
civil rights organizations to issue a "long overdue protest" against racial discrimination
allegedly practiced by the New York Athletic Club.
A joint statement issued by Dore Schary, national chairman of the ADL; Roy Wilkins,
executive director of the NAACP; and Whitney Young, executive director of the Urban League,
''° hailed the public attention given to the fact that "what may be the largest private club in the
largest city in the world still uses race as a membership criterion." They also praised the decision
by Negro athletes not to participate in the upcoming NYAC track meet and the other college
teams and athletic associations that have withdrawn or allowed their team members to do so..

Continuing Israel Emergency Campaign
Met Here Again as 'Historic Necessity'

Pre-Campaign Contributions to Two Funds Mount to $4,730,000

Alerted to the newly-emerging crises in Israel and the growing threats of the possibility of a re-emerging war resulting
from Arab refusals to recognize Israel's sovereignty and to commence peace negotiations, the Allied Jewish Campaign and Israel
Emergency Fund swelled to new proportions with gifts made at the pre-campaign dinner held Wednesday at the Statler-Hilton.

Because of the continuing emergencies, the scheduled speaker, Gen. Aharon Ariv, chief of the Israel intelligence staff, was
unable to leave Israel, and the analyses of existing situations were made by Rabbi Herbert Friedman of New York, executive vice
president of the United Jewish Appeal, who came to fill the gap as guest speaker.
Upon the conclusion of the solicitations, William Avrunin, executive vice president of the Jewish Welfare Federation, an-

nounced that the total subscribed as of that night was $4,730,000— $2,522,000 for the regular Allied Jewish Campaign funds which
provide for local and national needs, with the UJA as the major beneficiary, and $2,208,000 for the Israel Emergency Fund—
the largest amount ever recorded at a pre•campaign function.
Alfred L. Deutsch and Maxwell Jospey, co-chairman of this year's drive, alternated in presiding at the dinner. Contribu-
tions were polled during the card-calling period by Max Shaye, Samuel Frankel, Richard Sloan. Lewis Grossman. Meyer Fishman
and David Mondry. Paul Zuckerman, vice president of the Jewish Welfare Federation and a former Allied Jewish Campaign
chairman, who headed the 1967 Israel Emergency Fund campaign, introduced the guest speaker.

Rabbi Friendman warned of possible dangers on Israel's borders. He stated that the retired chief of the Israeli armed forces,
Gen. Itzhak Rabin, would advise those probing into history that "there was no comprehension about a confrontation which led to the
fighting in June because the withdrawal of the United Nations Expeditionary Force came suddenly, the Nasser announcement of
the closing of entrance to Israeli shipping at Sharm el Sheikh was not known in advance and neither was the sudden massing of
troops." On the other hand, he declared, the present chief of staff, Gen. Chaim Bar-Lev, and others now feel that on the basis
of developments, with not a single Arab state willing to sit down to talk peace with Israel, new hostilities may break out at any time.

It is now more than ever a question of protecting the lives of the people and to assure the safety of the country. Rabbi Fried-
man said. He said that 1,200 El Fatah terrorists already are under arrest in Israel for participation in guerrilla warfare and that
the threats have not diminished, and that Israel's position remains grave.
Emphasizing that even during the most trying periods Israel's doors always remained open to those seeking sanctuary in the
Jewish state. Dr. Friedman said that no Jew ever is asked to contribute towards Israel's military defense needs, but that life
saving is the duty of the Jews of the world.
"The life saving job remains our responsibility," he declared. "We never did it fully. Both the defense needs and the settle-
ment of escapees from oppression were shouldered by Israel, and ours was a minimal share. In June ours became a major share
and in 1968 it'll be our responsibility again. We would not have come to you for an emergency, but it is required in enormous
dimensions. There is the historic necessity to make sacrifices again."

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