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January 12, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jordan High Command's Planned Attacks
on Settlements Repulsed by Israeli Planes

TEL AVIV (JTA)—Israeli jets
roared into action to silence Jor-
danian artillery that had been main-
taining a heavy barrage for hours
against Israeli settlements in the
Beisan Valley. The fighting, in
which Israeli artillery and tanks
returned the Jordanian fire, was
the fiercest in weeks. But, at last
reports, no Israeli casualties were
suffered, all planes returned
safely to their bases, and the front
was quiet.
An Israeli soldier was killed
earlier in the day and four border
policemen were injured when their
jeep hit a mine east of the settle-
ment of Gesher, in the northern
Beisan Valley. No casualties were
suffered when an Israeli half-track
struck a mine in the Gaza Strip,
south of Rafah. The vehicle, how-
ever, was damaged. Another mine
was discovered less than a mile
away and was safely dismantled,
a military spokesman reported.
Monday's battle of the Beisan

started when Jordanians opened
fire on Jewish National Fund
workers in the southern part of
the valley, switching from small
arms to heavy artillery. Israeli
tanks and artillery replied, and
that exchange ended in two
hours. A half hour later, how-
ever, Jordanians began shelling
the settlements of Kfar Ruppin
and Maoz Chaim in the Beisan
Valley, and soon extended their
fire to other sections of the
area. Israeli tanks and artillery
again returned the fire, then
called on the. Air Force to si-
lence the Jordanian guns.

There were no reports of the ex-
tent of the damage suffered by the
settlements. Security authorities
here believe that the attack was
planned by the Jordanian high
command because the use of heavy
artillery is permitted only on a
divisional level, and Arab Legion
general headquarters were fully
aware of the attack. Circles here

ap-
parently trying to demonstrate to

said that Jordan was

the other Arab states that ru-
mors of a possible accord between
Amman and Jerusalem are false.
(At the United Nations, Israel
informed the Security Council
Monday that it had ordered lim-
ited air action against Jordanian
artillery positions to stop "unin-
terrupted, intense and indiscrim-
inate" shelling of the Israeli vil-
lages of Kfar Ruppin and Maoz
Chaim, and its attendant danger
to life and property. The statement
was contained in a letter which
Ambassador Gideon Rafael of Is-
rael also said that the Israeli
Government "holds the Jordanian
authorities responsible for these
deliberate and unprovoked at-
tacks.")

Egypt, the strongest of the
Arab states, is the only one
likely to start a new war, "but
she will never risk one without
permission from the Kremlin,"
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan
told a meeting of defense minis-
try workers. Dayan was eon-
fident that there would be no
renewed warfare along the West
Bank because its inhabitants
have no desire for war and their
thinking may affect the leaders
in Amman.
He conceded, however, that Is-
rael will never be able to entirely
eliminate terrorist activities, "be-
cause they operate from bases be-
yond our borders." Nevertheless,
Dayan said, "we are defeating the
primary aim of the terrorists,
which is to disrupt normal life
in Israel." He said, that whatever
develops, Israel's future borders
will be drawn according to her
security needs. "They will not re-
main, as before June 5, near Na-
tanya and Kfar Saba." The two
towns he mentioned lie in what
was the narrowest portion of Is-
rael prior to the June war.
Gen. Dayan indicated that Is-
rael's forces were fully ready to

there, he said, "because, behind
the southern front stands the
strongest Arab state and one that
is vying for leadership of the Arab
world and has the support of Rus-
sia." He said he was confident
that the West Bank will remain
quiescent militarily, "not because
the inhabitants support us or want
us to control them, but because
they know that a new war will
bring in its wake only destruction
and ruin to themselves and their
homes."
Mines believed to have been
made in Communist China were
used by terrorists to blow up the
offices for regional water instal-
lations in the upper Jordan Val-
ley, Israeli officials reported.
Because the installations do not
function during the winter sea-
son, no personnel was present.
Pumps and an electric power
unit were undamaged.
The pumping station is located
near the Yarmuk River, south of
the Shaar Hagolah kibutz. The
installation provides water for
many collectives in the area, in-
cluding Kinneret, Degania, Beth
Zera and Affikim.
Terrorists who left pamphlets
signed by El Fatah, one of several
Arab guerrilla groups operating
against Israel, cut their way
through barbed wire fences to
enter the area and plant the
mines. Footprints of five persons
were found leading to the Yarmuk
River. The intruders apparently
crossed the Yarmuk into Jordan.
• *
Eban Says Egypt Has Not
Approached Israel on Freeing
Ships; Sees Jarring 4th Time
JERUSALEM (JTA)—Israel is
still awaiting Egypt's proposals
for the planned release of the for-
eign ships stranded in a section
of the Suez Canal since Cairo
blocked the canal last June. This
fact became clear here Sunday
after a c binet meeting in which
Foreign Minister Abba Eban re-
ported he had met for the fourth
time Sunday with Ambassador
Gunnar V. Jarring, the United Na-
tions special peace emissary to
the Middle East. Eban said Jar-
ring had made no mention of
Egypt's plans to release the
stranded ships.
In Israel's view, any plans by
Egypt to use any portion of the
canal must come through Lt. Gen.
Odd Bull. Eban said that, after
his meeting with Ambassador Jar-
ring, the envoy left for Amman,
capital of Jordan.
The cabinet also heard a report
on security affairs from Gen.
Moshe Dayan, the minister of de-
fense. In the absence of Premier
Levi Eshkol, who is in the United
States, the cabinet session was
presided over by minister of fi-
nance Pinhas Sapir.
Israelis were told there is no
sign of peace on the horizon and

that they must cultivate strong
nerves to weather the storms
that lie ahead. The dim view
of peace prospects was taken by
Maj. Gen. Chaim Bar-Lev, new
chief of staff of Israel's armed
forces, who told a group of
officer graduates at a base
somewhere in Israel that "for the
Israeli Army, the war is not yet
over." The warning of a long,
difficult struggle ahead, before
a settlement is achieved with
the Arab countries, was voiced
by Eban in a statement in the
Knesset.
Eban spoke in reply to an agenda

motion by S. Tamir, of the right-
wing Free Center faction, who
demanded clarification of Israel's
stand on occupied territories be-
fore Prime Minister Eshkol's de-
parture for the United States

and his s talks with Presi-
dent Johnson. The Free Center

regards all occupied territories
as part of Israel, and has been
calling for "legal and practical
steps"
to affirm it.
meet any new assault "from the
Eban's request to strike the
southern front, south of the Suez
area." A new war would start motion from the agenda was

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

adopted by all members, except
those of the Free Center and
Haolam Hazeh factions, after the
Foreign Minister called on all Is-
raelis to "be wary of panic-mong-
ers who accuse the government
of weakness or wavering." He
noted that the Knesset has always
supported government policies by
large majorities and urged the
maintenance of a united front.
Eban stressed that the govern-
ment's position with regard to fu-
ture boundaries has not changed,
and that there will be no statement
on future frontiers until direct
peace negotiations begin with the
Arabs, "but the struggle to achieve
this will be long and difficult."
Gen. Bar-Lev, in an address to
new officers and officer candi-
dates, said that, while the Arabs
may not be continuing their call
for the destruction of Israel, their
basic attitude toward Israel re-
mains unchanged, and no one can
predict when it will change. A
strong army, he said, is a condition
of Israel's survival and must be

Chicago College Given Collection of Judaica

CHICAGO, (—JTA) — A private
collection of Jewish artifacts, man-
uscripts and ceremonial objects,
some of them more than 1,000
Years old, has been donated to the
College of Jewish Studies here by
Maurice Spertus, a Chicago phil-
anthropist and businessman, in
whose name the college has opened
a museum.
The collection, one of the largest
of its kind in the world, is valued
at half a million dollars.

MILWAUKEE, (JTA)—A pilot
project to provide casework con-
sultation an social services to chil-
ren of the Hillel Academy, a Mil-
waukee day school, has helped the
teaching staff to understand better
the needs of children with difficul-
ties, the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service has reported.
The project grew out of a meet-
ing of the agency to consider a co-
ordinated effort to extend case
work services to children in the
community's Jewish educational
facilities.
Ralph Sherman, executive direc-
tor of the JFCS, said that the prob-
lems of the 108 children at the day
school were no different from the
problems of children in public
schools. He pointed out that public
schools offer social services to fam-
ilies and that the agency's work
with the Hillel Academy was "sim-
ply a reflection of that principle—
that case work services offer the
school and the children something
special in terms of a deeper under-
standing of human behavior and
relationships."
During the year the project was
in effect, some 20 pupils were re-
ferred to the case work consultant
by a teacher or the principal. Some
of the children were seen diagnos-
tically and others were referred
directly to the JFCS. The consult-
ant sought to help the teachers help
the child, so that the educational
and religious experiences in school
would have a positive impact. It
soon became evident that the con-
sultative process did provide an op-
portunity to transmit to the school
staff a deeper undersanding of the
individual child.

ern and North African Jewish ob-
jects, contains the largest and fin-
est collection of Yemenite manu-
scripts in the world, he said.
The Jewish College of Chicago,
founded in 1925, provides academic
and professional training in Judiac
and Hebraic studies in four-year

degree program.

Spertus also donated $100,000 in
a cash endowment fund to cover
administrative costs of the Mau-
rice Spertus Museum of Judaica.

According to Dr. David Wein-
stein, president of the college, the
Spertus gift "represents one of the
largest single gifts to an Amer-
ican undergraduate Jewish col-
lege."
The collection, unique in its
heavy concentration on Near East-

'68s

ready should it be called to action
again. He told the new officers
that "you are now joining that
group of men in Israel's army
whose call is always, 'follow me.' "

Milwaukee Unit Tests
Aid to Day Schoolers

Friday, January 12, 1968-5

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