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January 05, 1968 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



$5,100,100 Israel Bond Sales Set All-Time
Record; 115 Per Cent Increase Over 1966

The 1967 Detroit Israel Bond campaign resulted in a record total of $5,100,100
in cash sales. it was announced by Louis E. Levitan, Detroit director. This is an
increase of 115 per cent, or more than double the sales figure for 1966, which totaled
$2.365,700. It puts Detroit in the forefront in the nation in Israel Bond per capita
cash sales.
The phenomenal record was dine to the crisis in Israel, culminating in the Six-
Day War, which shook the Detroit Jewish community as no other event in its history.
The Israel Bond emergency campaign, launched during the crisis, late in May, resulted
in a flood of purchases which inundated the Israel Bond office and its staff and
required the help of many dedicated volunteers to process the applications pouring in.
The Israel Bond Emergency Campaign and the Israel Emergency Fund

worked closely together during the entire period.-

The Israel Emergency Dinner on June 12, which honored The Jewish News
on its 25 years of publication. and its editor and publisher. Philip Slomovitz, was the
high point of the campaign and the most fruitful Israel Bond event ever held in Detroit.
It brought the total to $3,400,000 in cash sales by the end of June.
The Israel Miracle Year dinner on Nov. 7, which honored Emma Schaver, first
Detroit recipient of the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanities Award, was a highlight of the
Fall Israel Bond campaign, resulting in Israel Bond subscriptions totaling $1,000,000.
A record total of $1, 689,400 was subscribed in the Israel Bond High Holy
Day Appeal and in related congregational activities, an increase of $400,000 above

the amount in 1966, according to Phillip Stoliman, chairman of the Israel Bond
Congregational and High Holy Day Council.
Adas Shalom Synagogue set the pace, with $755,000, once again leading the
nation. Bnai David was second with $202,250, Beth Abraham third with $180,000 and
Bnai Moshe fourth, with $153,000. Highly successful dinners pushed up the totals of
Bnai David, Beth Abraham, Bnai Moshe, Temple Israel, Beth Shalom and Beth Hillel.
Practically every congregation was active in the Israel Bond Emergency Campaign,

with Temple Beth El and Temple Emanu-El also actively participating.
Other highly successful affairs were the United Israel Bond dinner-dance, in
which five "newcomer" organizations united; the Labor Zionist and Landsmanshaften
affair honoring Hyman Lipsitz; the Pioneer Women's luncheon which was part of the
I2 campaign; the Town and Country Club dinner-dance; the Bnai Brith Hanuka
.
festivals for Israel and the Jerusalem • Hanuka Celebration.
The Women's Division, under the chairmanship of Emma Schaver, had an
active role in the success of the campaign, with its fashion festival, its sponsor
enrollment affairs and other productive functions, led by Mrs. David Pollack, sponsor
chairman; Mrs. Sidney Schwartz, cash chairman; Mrs. Louis Berry, art exhibit lunch-
eon chairman, and Mrs. Morris J. Brandwine, fashion show luncheon chairman, and
Mesdames Max Stollman and Norman Allan who, along with the above, hosted the
May 21 sponsor dinner, just prior to the Six-Day War.

Maimonides' Historic 'Mishneh Torah' In Bilingual
Version
Maimonides' introduction

to his
so that he may be in position
Nearly half a century ago, Hay- •ence on many generations has to the mixed response, to the bitter body,
been incalculable. All Rabbinic attack upon Maimonides as soon as to acquire the ethical and mental "Mishneh Torah" is included here
yim Nahman Bialik, the great He
the
writings
of
the
past
seven
cep-
the
work
appeared.
Dr.
Birnbaum
virtues."
Then
Dr.
Birnbaum
coin-
in
the
original
Hebrew
with
brew poet, writing to Dr. Hayyim
ments further on Maimonides' English translation and annota-
tunes have been greatly affect- points out in his introduction:
Heller regarding a popular edition
tions.
"In
a
most
revealing
letter,
ad-
teachings:
ed by it. Indeed, the Arba'ah
of Maimonides' "Mishneh Torah,"
Appended to the volume is an
"In the 'Mishneh Torah' he
Turim by Rabbi Jacob ben Ash- dressed to Rabbi Joseph ibn Aknin,
proposed "in order to make the
writes: A man should carefully index of biblical references and a
er (1269.1340) and the Shulhan Maimonides writes: 'You should
choice parts of his (Maimonides')
the things that are injur- list of terms defined by Maimon-
avoid
know
that
I
have
not
composed
Rabbi
Jacob
Karo
book equally available to all . . .' Aruk by
ious to the human body, and cul- ides in his text.
(1488.1575) were to a great ex- this work in order to become
to revive the effectiveness of this
A great service has been ren-
tivate habits that will preserve
tent drawn from the `Mishneh world-famous . . . My witness is in
great book and make its influence
his health. He should not eat ex- dered by Dr. Birnbaum and his
Torah'.
Their
very
phraseology
heaven,
that
originally
I
intended
prevail on all the Jewish people of
publishers;
Hebrew Publishing Co.,
when
he
is
hungry,
nor
cept
I is borrowed froju the code of it for myself . . . I have been con-
our time."
drink except when he is thirsty. by making this great and historic
stantly aware that the book I have
Maimonides ..."
The eminent Jewish scholar, Dr.
He should not gorge himself, but work available for the lay public.
Philip Birnbaum, calls attention
Dr. Birnbaum proceeds i o - d- written will undoubtedly fall into
leave the table before his appe• Dr. Birnbaum has gained much
anew to Bialik's view in his new cate how the "Mishneh Torah" the hands of some evil, envious
tite is fully appeased. During a fame for his excellent translations
its
"the
epitome
of
Judaism
individuals
who
will
disparage
edition of "Maimonides' Mishneh serves as
meal he should drink only a little of the Siddur and Mahzor and for
excellent contents and give the im-
Torah (Yad Hazakah)" which has in all its varied aspects."
water . . . one should not eat such noteworthy works as "A Book
this
great
work
pression
that
they
can
do
without
The writing of
been issued by Hebrew Publishing
before taking exercise, such as - of Jewish Concepts." "A Treasury
in Hebrew did not please all. An it; or into the hands of a hopeless ,
Company.
walking a certain distance to of Judaism" and "Fluent Hebrew."
Vocalized and richly annotated, interesting fact is declared by Rab- ignoramus who, failing to appreci-
stimulate the body . . . One Now, with the editing of "Mishneh
the project, will regard it as
with a most informative and evalu- ' hi Birnbaum in this regard, in this ate
should be seated while eating, Torah," he has enriched his crea-
useless ... However, in the future,
ative introduction, Rabbi Birn- incident recorded by him:
and
not walk about until after tive contributions to Jewish litera-
when envy and vulgarity will cease.
baum's very important work was
"The `Mishneh Torah' is one of all the people of Israel will content
ture and has assured the fulfill-
the food is digested ... "
edited by him from rare manu-
the most readily understood themselves with it exclusively with- I
This is a mere sample of Mai- menu of hopes expressed by Bialik
scripts and early texts. Published
books in all the Jewish litera- out a doubt ... "
monides' works and one of the and now by scholars of our own
in response to a great need for
ture. In a letter to one of his
Dr. Birnbaum is emphatic in many explanatory notes on the time not only for the revival of a
this work expressed by leading
correspondents, who had ex-
asserting that attacks on Mai- ethical codes in "Mishneh Torah." great commentary but its availabil-
rabbis and scholars, a great need
pressed regret that the 'Mishneh
monides were "from mere envy." The principles dealt with include ity for popular usage in congrega-
is filled with its availablity for
Torah' was not open to him be-
A reviewer finds himself greatly charity, religious practices, edu• tional and other classes and by
popular usage as a way of enlight-
cause it was written in Hebrew handicapped not to be able to re- cation, health, attitude to women, interested individuals.
—P.S.
P.S.
ening Jewry on the humane Jewish
instead of Arabic, Maimonides produce important portions of the ethical wills and many other sub-
codes inherent in traditional ethi-
wrote to the effect that his Ile- "Mishneh Torah" as it has been jects.
cal teachings.
I brew style was so easy that it edited by Dr. Birnbaum. But there
2/111 ;Y :7
In "Mishneh Torah" Maimon-; took one a short time to grasp is sufficient material in his intro-
1-1,-)1.7rjr11,99;1177/-1499n.
ides (Moses ben Maimon-1135-
it."
duction evidencing the significance,
1204) incorporated biblical lore,'
Dr. Birnbaum adds to this the of this work and the masterful ed- I
the teachings of Talmud Bavli comment: "It is indeed very unfor- ttriangsioaft i o itn asan%cvlellanansdahteionbsrilliFaonrt
(1 9 1 7 —18 3 6 ) r;in-prt =or aiL,v, ipio;)
S711:71
and Talmud Yerushalmi, mid- tunate that this classical work has i
rashic literature and gaonic re- been neglected in Jewish education example, in relation to one aspect Ind Ino-ri
npnn - -tri9t?
''713n' 41:11-19pn int0;
sponsa. 1 so that many a student of Jewish of Maimonides's commentaries, the '

rr-pwrr rnipt?r!
,t713» 17*.pwrt amp
Dr. Birnbaum explains the texts lore knows little beyond its name." physical and health needs of pea- 'n?.?
These annotations were made by ple, Dr. Birnbaum writes: "It is
and the wealth of material in this
a rr-rkt- p rr-pwrj nripan
-m
Ti "pi
.nty-tn1
great work, contained in Hebrew Dr. Birnbaum in 1944. In the new possible to shape one's conduct
Publishing Co.'s volume of more ; edition released by Hebrew Pub- t waiitihnngo o ani m
e, ehyeoanl t ho ar t g ou f am
rdaii n ng - '
ninvi
opinx73
sb .orrin
nil's 3 l73 mu "
than 400 pages, in a foreword and lishing Co. last month, Dr. Bins-
pi
th
scholarly introduction — both ap- baum pointed to the current in- gatyinIst tdoisrosev i . h tevpeerrshoen'scanre t aol
rnin
tr ., ;;./ ton .13.;17 ...,Tipt?r,
.pyr,
nearing in Hebrew and in the Eng- creasing demand for this volume,
lish translation. The "terse and emphasizing that "simplicity of vo- maintain
1'n451intp ity; =t,n. .1-1/11 rp-pv This miri#
- a perfect condition of the
direct style" used by Maimonides cahulary and uniformity of ar-
-known as the Rambam—is em- I rangement have been stressed to Hebrew Corner
• 3 V-IP 71' ?;9 ;179VPI,
phasized by Dr. Birnbaum who meet the practical requirements of
states that the 12th Century's handy information."
pi'71;) '71# ninaliwpri rY134V.; -rin'?'? 1'7;7 tip;
The Grandfather of
scholar's "desire for clearness and , Narly all pages of the 336 pages
T
r e Literature
lucidity was in the course of time of actual text with parallel trans- Hbw
1??! 1 i317, 3
h e w'r it r Shalom Yaakov A„amo- • tri lr
a ?:1 i'lPz 'TT DV i7Dt
nearly defeated by multitudes of ations are filled with notes which vita (1836-191.7), known by his pseud
1 ; 3
11 .- 0? - , 1 wn4 41 7-1 , 40 1
1p2
commentaries and super-eommen- keep the reader fully guided about called the randfather of the new He-
taries," Dr. Birnbaum explains: I the basic laws and principles enun- b rew litera l
raw riprir; riVF tt.*7? re? min .trrO R
lg
dih
ash vrTa3 my! r.inn
eu
"The main purpose of these com- elated by Maimonides. Dr. Birn-
nc l e ren'erilierregielaenleVi
any other wter
li tuature more tha
e7,
...fel Title
mentaries was to identify the de- I baum used rare manuscripts and
mni ,n1npri
pov trin .0?iotr7 i'pt# 11:17'7
a l ttl
Wieingl r h e "ahs ea
nin tennnihitoeri:A
of : a
cisions stated in the "Mishneh, old texts that are being preserved to
rkia llhis father was a scholar. l l'e
a private tutor to teach
after
Torah' with the views expressed by I in the Jewish Theological Semin-
9
.717'P '7? '1P 931
and the Bible. His father •
=i11P'? r32 5'rir);71
rblug
the talmudic authorities. The pro-, ary library in the preparation of h diedd
was a young boy,
when
hung er.
verbial phrase a difficult Ram- I this work and among the texts he an the fa n ny suffered
17,*11 -rrm
nirr
' -1v ~ 2113Y37 wans ins
rl famous
barn' never refers to the meaning used was the ea iest edition, pre- Mendele went otz to k stray
and Vilna. After a
of
the
year
1480
,
and
Jew
sumably
the
maule
d
9
Ywehnireintisofn
of any particular passage in the
71 "71,4P .71:9 11 n117 .73
1- 4 '1*M J1 •tr
him children. e :cae went n to
`Mishneh Torah', for that is easily I following: Soncino, 1490; Co stan- and bore gLi
toliftear his stepfather's
.n11:11=1
rir3
-rprit?
..4k,7!
intelligible to anybody who is mod- tinople. 1509; Venice, 1524 and tchlidrven
.n,31'7wri
He coteald neot ng et the ; Ill tfilh Iiai;
erately familiar with the Hebrew 1551; Amsterdam, 1702-3; Book 1 hard.
t7p4aetg
lfd
is . little , brothers, and h
1.739
nianp.
nnv
ran sal
n,r3
,3i11
0,11;17
.117171 19in1
back to
language. The difficulties raised by Madda edited by Dr. Moses Ilyam; He was occupied
inhY);
with JneVishotphIfinosop
the scholars do not concern what son and the Bo leian Codex 1937. d and books on mystic
literature. At the
1'v3
1
=107)7.1 fiat
Dr. Birnbaum's introduction is sa me tim e , he also began to write 1=7;q7. 1 1 11'?7 ? 4 ,r1‘911 le? 1:11V ,r4P7
Maimonides says but rather why he
One day a Jewish beggar sug•
in itself an outstanding work of poetry.
says it. As a matter of fact, the
gested that he join him on a begging -17?'
nirri
; -rnvi
ra
r2in
-
'27.1r)r;
.
e
?
Jewish scholarship. It _combines Journey• among the cities of Western
major sources of Maimonides' le-
Mendele agreed. For a year and
analyses of Maimonides' princi- Russia.
gal and ethical maxims have al-
a half, he wandered with the beggar
Pies with historical data review- among the towns and forests. He
ready been ascentained by illust-
learned to know the life of the poor
ing the reactions to Maimonides' and
1 7.1:12:0 nyirprp
tr-rnt?
tr-ir,pxn
trious scholars such as Joseph
the miserable beggars. lie saw little 4I71V
teachings, and it incorporates an towns where Jews lived in penury and
Karo."
ho pel es sness.
1711 ,h11 ~ 91 1311
nnya
13411:1
impressive
biographical
sketch
.nninp,rp,
Maimonides had written in
He settled in the town of Kamnitz.



n4/Pr3





Arabic but the Mishneh Torah
was in Hebrew. Dr. Birnbaum
provides this information: "Writ-
ten in lucid Hebrew, the Mishneh
Torah penetrated every - Jewish
community where it was studied
by both young and old. Its influ•

40—Friday, January 5, 1968

of the great teacher, philosopher,
physician, historian, jurispru-
dent and commentator on reli-
gion and ethics.

Explaining the style of "Mishneh
Torah", Maimonides' resort to "ut-
most brevity," Dr. Birnbaum points

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

where he learned Russian. German
and arithmetic and passed the Coven-
he
at teaching examinations. La
began to teach in a school.
During that period, he started to
write stories in Yiddish, essays on ed-
ucational and literary subjects, and
also translated books on zoology and
history. He wrote realistic novels and
satires in Yiddish. and at the end of the
century he resumed writing in Hebrew
and translated his books from Yiddish
into Hebrew.

me

9

ic, 41

trorripol 1371?9

73.1.15n 1,199

n,r?'?iy (1'1131 nn? rq54in?)

Or-Tyr 1113119 l? Tin?! rzi

,=?1,,t,1 trInin =r1.?,
=in?' ?

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