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December 29, 1967 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-12-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10—Friday, December 29, 1967

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Study on Jewish Education in America
Shows Drop in School Enrollment

NEW YORK (JTA) — A slight more than 46,000 children or half
decline in enrollment in Jewish of the 96,000 children attending
schools in the United States since Orthodox-sponsored schools, are
1960 has been reported by the registered in all-day schools. At
American Association for Jewish the other extreme, only 9,600 chil-
Education on the basis of data dren attend one - day - a - week
from its third quinquennial nation- schools. However, it was pointed
al census of Jewish schools. out, the total of 96.000 children be-
Other findings from the compre- ing educated under Orthodox aus-
hensive national survey were that pices represents 21.5 per cent of
more than 40 per cent of all re- the total number of enrolled chil-
a-week students
schools; attended
Yiddish-speaking
ported
one-day- dren, which is the smallest of the
three major congregational group-
schools have ceased o be a signif- ings.
The data showed that one-day-a-
icant element in American Jewish
education; and that more than 90 week Jewish education remains
per cent of all children receiving a largely a Reform approach, with
Jewish education attend congrega- 125,000 or 78 per cent of all chil-
dren of Reform families attending
tional schools.
school one day a week, which rep-
Data from 1955 and 1962 pre-
resents more than 84 per cent of
vious studies
indicated
that was
a all such
children
in the United States in
plateau
in school
enrollment
schools.
reached in 1960. The slight de-
Jewish education under Yid-
cline was attributed to the de-
dish auspices was reported to be
clining Jewish birthrate during
essentially a large city phenom-
the 1950s and 1960s.
enon. Some 80 per cent of the
The
latest
AAJE
census
showed
4,364
children attending such
that more than 540,000 Jewish chil-
schools
do so in the four largest
dren from three to 17 years of age Jewish communities.
were estimated to be receiving
It
may
be concluded that, except
some form of Jewish education.
A response to the survey ques- for a constantly diminishing and
scattered enrollment in several
tionnaire was obtained from 455 communities, Yiddish schooling is
out of 671 Jewish
communities,
the American
representing
more than
95 per cent disappearing
scene. It was from
predicted
that such
of the total American Jewish pop-
ulation. These communities in- enrollment in the larger cities
also become of
a victim
of the
cluded 2,070 out of 2,727 listed would
decentraliziation
the Jewish

Wall Street Journal Sees Grim Egypt Trusting Nasser

NEW YORK (JTA) — Despite I
the devastation of the Egyptian
economy as the result of the Six-
Day War, the fellahin have been
virtually untouched and live as
they have always lived with the
result that they have remained
loyal to Nasser and are prepared
to follow him into another war
with Israel. These were the con-
clusions reached by Wall Street
Journal correspondent Ray Vicker,
Eepytian village
after visiting
typical. he said, of those in which
24,000.000 of the country's 31,500,000
people live.

Writing from the village of Mit-
Rahina. the correspondent reported
that the war has had an impact
on the villages in only the smallest
ways, the chief being the curtail-
ment of kerosene supplies. "The
peasantry remains almost untouch-
ed by the conflict of captains and
kings," the correspondent declared.
"Their stomachs still full. their way
of life unshaken. the fellahin have
no reason to abandon their firm
allegiance to President Nasser —
one important reason Egypt's
ruler has been able to maintain a
strong diplomatic (if not military)
front against Israel, despite crush-
ing problems."

The Wall Street Journal corres-
pondent painted a grim picture of
the Egyptian situation. "Economic
worries continue to mount," he
said. "Egypt today is nearly in-
solvent, and owes more than
$1,000,000,000 to foreign govern-
! ments, not including debts incur-
schools.
community
the movement to ,' red in the recent acquisition of
The study found
that more than and
suburbia.
Red arms to replace those aban-
half of all reported students at-
tend religious schools for two days
a week or less. The study found
also that 193,000 were enrolled two
to five days a week and 59,800, or
13.5 per cent, were enrolled in day
Jewish schools. However, the re-
port found, day school enrollment
accounts for only 4.5 per cent of all
educable Jewish Children.
Among the major conclusions
was the fact that Yiddish-speaking
schools, which were a substantial
part of the Jewish educational sys-
tem in the United States in the
early part of this century, are no
longer significant. Only 4,364 are ,
currently enrolled in such schools.'
Another conclusion was that
afternoon Hebrew schools under
communal auspices, which for a
long time were the major insti-
tution for educating Jewish chil-
dren, are diminishing. Such
schools now enroll only 21,456
children or less than 5 per cent
of the total.
A consequence of these devel-
opments, it was indicated, was that
the responsibility for providing
Jewish education in the United
States is now virtually in congre-
gational hands.
In evaluating the implications of
the survey findings by congrega-
tional groups, it was noted that

doned in the desert during the June
war. Roughly 80 per cent of the
UAR's oil-refining capacity has
been destroyed by Israeli shelling.
The cotton crop, an important ex-
port, is off 11 per cent this year
because necessary insecticides
weren't distributed. The Suez
Cane]. which normally brings in
$250,000,000 a year, is shut down.
The tourist business has all but
disappeared. Amin Shaker, minis-
ter of tourism, estimates it for-
merly brought Egypt $100,000,000
a year."
The correspondent noted the aid
Egypt is receiving from the Com-
munist bloc, the other Arab states,
Italy and France, but he said, "the
real strength of Egypt lies on the
apparent willingness of its people
to trust President Nasser's judge-
ment. A Western diplomat in Cario,
asked if economic pressures are
likely to force the UAR into a
settlement with Israel, shakes his
head and declares: "the world is
going to have a long wait if it
thinks economic problems will
force the UAR to bargain on
Israeli terms."
Vickers reported that "un-

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realistic as the determination not to
compromise with Israel may seem
to a visitor, it is obviously firmly
entrenched. And it is entrenched
most firmly of all among the fella-
Inn." He points out that "almost
no one places any blame for the
war and Egypt's defeat on Presi-
dent Nasser." One villager he
quoted as typical, said the fiasco
was caused by "bad people" since
removed from the government, and
"on Israeli aggression supported by
the United States."

Who is the forgotten man? He is
the clean, quiet, virtuous, domestic
citizen, who pays his debts and his
taxes and is never heard of out of
his little circle.—William Graham

Sumner.

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SLATKIN S

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Between Southfield &
Telegraph

"2 Minutes from

Northland"

-ANNE•1111**ININIC..

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK
Presents

"HERITAGE AND HOPE"

Adult Studies Lecture Series for 1968

2 Arab Students
Nabbed in Israel
as Agitators

(Direct JTA Teletype wire
to The Jewish News)

JERUSALEM—The arrest of a
second Arab student leader who
entered Israel illegally to foment
unrest in the West Bank and East
Jerusalem was announced by
police Wednesday.
He is Taisir Kuba, a fourth-year
history major at Cairo University
and president of the Palestine Stu-
dents Organization. Tuesday, police
announced the arrest of the presi-
dent of the Lebanese Students
Union, a senior at Beirut Univer-
sity, who infiltrated into Israel
with a band of El Fatah terrorists
and was agitating among young
educated Arabs in the West Bank
and East Jerusalem.
Kuba, who was born in the West
Bank, participated in student con-
gresses in Moscow and other
Communist capitals and also at-
tended a congress of Palestinian
terrorist organizations. The Pales-
tine Students Organization which
he heads has branches in 30 coun-
tries.

PROF. WILLIAM F. ALBRIGHT

PROF. CECIL ROTH

ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER

Insights and values of the Jewish Tradition will be considered by distinguished scholars

in response to the challenges of the contemporary scene.

PROGRAM

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9

Professor William F. Albright,
Professor Emeritus of Semitic
Languages, Johns Hopkins University

"The Impact of Archaelogical Discoveries on
the Contemporary Understanding of the
Bible."

TUESDAY, JANUARY 16

Dr. Milton Covensky,
Professor of History,
Wayne State University

"Mysticism, Judaism and LSD"

TUESDAY, JANUARY 23

Milton Himmelfarb,
Director of the Information Service,
American Jewish Committee

"Jewish Youth and Jewish Commitment"

TUESDAY, JANUARY 30

Dr. Marshall Sklare,
Professor of Sociology, Yeshiva University

"Hope For The Vanishing American Jew"

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Professor Cecil Roth,
Professor of History, Bar-Ilan University

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Isaac Bashevis Singer,
Noted author and lecturer

a

20811 W. 8 Mile Rd.

"The Arts in Jewish History"
(Co-sponosered with the Fine Arts
Commission of Shaarey Zedek)

"My Philosophy As A Jewish Writer"

Lectures will begin at 8:30 p.m. in the Morris Adler Hall of Congregation
Shaarey Zedek. For further information call the synagogue office at 357-5544.

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