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December 01, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jarring Takes Up 'Formidable Task' in Mid East

(Continued from Page 1)
patch of a special UN representa-
tive to the Middle East. The reso-
lution was also rejected by the so-
called Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization headed by Ahmed Shu-
kairy which warned the Security
Council that no solution of the
Palestine question was possible
without the "official approval" of
the Palestine people.
Gen. Bull informed Israeli au-
thorities that the Egyptian authori-
ties had agreed to the increase in
the number of UN observers along
the Suez Canal. He told Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan that the
Egyptians had agreed to permit
direct wireless communication be-
tween the UN observers on both
sides of the canal. Egypt previous-
ly refused to permit direct com-
munications and the observers
could communicate with observers
across the canal only by relaying
messages through Jerusalem. Is-
rael previously had agreed to both
measures.
Jarring, who was Swedish Am-
bassador to the SoViet Union, left
his post in Moscow for the United
Nations and consultations with
Arab and Israeli officials before
departing for the Middle East on
what most observers considered a
formidable assignment.
Israeli officials greeted the ap-
pointment with satisfaction, modi-
fied by their apparent belief that
the Security Council debate on the
resolution adopted last week could
have ended with a Soviet veto of
the British draft which would have
made the impasse worse.
The resolution called for with-
drawal of Israel from occupied
Arab territories, termination of all
claims of belligerency, acknowl-
edgment by all parties of respect
for the sovereignty, integrity and
political independence of all states
in the area. It also proposed accept-
ance of the right to live in peace
by all states within recognized and
secure boundaries, free from
threats or acts of force.
The resolution also called for
guarantees of freedom of naviga-
tion through international water-
ways in the area, for a just settle-
ment of the refugee problem and
for guarantees of the territorial
inviolability and political inde-
pendence of every state in the area
through measures including crea-
tion of demilitarized zones.
The unanimous adoption of the
British resolution came as a sur-
prise. The Soviet Union introduced
a draft resolution earlier in the
week, which made no mention of
a special Mideast emissary. That
resolution, along with drafts by
the United States and an Indian-
Mali-Nigeria resolution, was with-
drawn, paving the way for ap-
proval of the British draft.
Diplomats at the UN character-
ized the British resolution as a

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document of "careful ambiguity"
but also as a serious setback for
the Middle East policies of the
Soviet Union. They noted that the
Soviets failed, at a special emer-
gency session of the General As-
sembly last June, to obtain ap-
proval for the demands voiced by
Premier Kosygin at the session
for immediate Israeli withdrawal,
condemnation of Israel as aggres-
sor in the June war and payment
by Israel of compensation to the
defeated Arab countries.
Only seven Arabs—old men and
women — crossed the Allenby
Bridge Monday to join theft
families in Israeli-held areas on
the West Bank, although Israel
had issued 30 permits good for
return to Israel on this day, the
first under the new Arab refu-
gee family reunion plan.
The family reunion plan applies
only to those Arabs living in Jor-
dan whose return is requested by
their relatives in Israeli-held areas.
Israel announced the plan last
September, when the influx of
refugees from Jordan was halted
except for relatives. There was no
explanation for the reason only
seven of 30 permit holders availed
themselves of the opportunity to
rejoin their families.
Arab residents and business-
men in the occupied West Bank
region were plunged into gloom
by Nasser's bellicose speech be-
fore the Egyptian national as-
sembly last week. They see it
resulting in tightened Israeli
security measures on the one
hand, and increased Arab ter-
rorist activities on the other —
with themselves caught in be-
tween.
This was the consensus in a sur-
vey conducted by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency in several West
Bank towns. Only a few days ago
the mood was guardedly optimis-
tic, following unanimous approval
by the UN Security Council of the
British resolution on the Middle
East. Many believed that Israeli
forces might begin to withdraw
before Christmas, which would
mean relief from Israeli taxes, the
aspect of occupation that the West
Bankers consider most burden-
some. As a result of Nasser's
speech, the same people believe
now that the occupation will last
for at least a year or more, and
see themselves as the main vic-
tims of "Nasser's boasting."
They fear that Nasser will sup-
port terrorist activities in the West
Bank, that King Hussein of Jordan
will not be able to follow an inde-
pendent course, and that Israel will
tighten her control. Some suggest
that Israel ignore Hussein and
work out a direct settlement with
the West Bankers, many of whom
apparently do not relish the pros-
pect of reunification with Jordan.
The owner of a large arts and
crafts firm told JTA that many
Arab businessmen are seriously
considering immigration to the
United States or Latin America,
fearing ruin if they remain.
The Israeli cabinet appointed a
special ministerial committee to
study the claims of various re-
ligious groups in Israel for re-
pairs to damages suffered by
church buildings in the Six-Day
War. Although no official sum
was given, it was learned that
the claims amount to $1,000,000.
The committee will submit rec-
ommendations as to whether aid
should be given, and in what
form. The cabinet was told that
only a few isolated claims had
been received from Moslem re-
ligious authorities for damages
to mosques, and that these have
been dealt with by the ministry
of religious affairs.

WHEN YOU

entering the Gaza Strip last June
to join his army unit.
*
*
TEL AVIV (JTA)—A concentra-
(Continued on Page 7)

An easing of the curfew in the
Gaza Strip and Northern Sinai
during the Moslem Holy Month
of Ramadan beginning Dec: 1

was announced by the military

- t e

0C/1

COCKT:!,11

Ceadd

,340S • 00 , 017

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governor Monday as Army engi-
neers took punitive action
against Arabs in the Gaza area
who were implicated in the mur-
der of a Jewish youth last June.

The engineers blew up several
houses and wooden huts at Djabi-
liya near Gaza. Investigations had
disclosed that their occupants
were involved in the disappearance
of Chaim Geron whose murdered
body was discovered buried in sand
dunes. Geron was misting after

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Page 6—Friday, December 1 1967

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