100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 22, 1967 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

16—Friday, September 22, 1967

Partisans Protest Polish Anti-Semitism

NEW YORK—The Federation of
Jt.wish Underground Fighter s
Against Nazism, in a letter to Pol-
i.-h Ambassador Jerzy Michalowski, ;
p -otested a recent speech by Polish t
Prime Minister Wladslaw Gomulka,
in which, the Federation said, the I
Polish official "fanned anew the
smouldering fire of anti-Semitism
in our former homeland."
Gomulka's "scathing attack on
Israel," the letter said, is refuted
by "the heroism of thousands of
Polish Jews who gave their lives ,
to defend Poland in 1939 from
Nazi and Russian aggression.
"Though ahandoned by the main-
stream of the Polish people, and
having witnessed the annihilation
of hundreds of thousands of their
co-religionists by the Nazis, Jews
continued to fight for the freedom
of all the Polish people" — as
underground fighters, partisans,
escapees from German camps.
The Federation, which is com-
posed of former partisans living
in the New York area, said it
resents and objects to "this new

LAWN
SPRINKLERS

REPAIR AND
INSTALLATION

Quality Work at
Reasonable Prices!

527-5044

"Get Our Price Last"

line of anti-Semitism against Is-
rael, especially in the face of good
Polish-American and Polish-Israeli
relations during the past twenty
years." It called upon the govern-
ment of Poland "to recant from its
harsh anti-Israel position and make
known once again its great sym-
pathy for and understanding of the
Jewish people, not only in Israel
but all over the world."
The letter, signed by Seymour
Robbins of Forest Hills, N.Y., pres-
ident of the Federation, and sent
to the Polish Embassy in Washing-
ton, said his organization looked
upon the tactic of the Polish Gov-
ernment with great disfavor.
Robbins pointed out that many
of the Polish Jews who battled the
Nazis in the forests of eastern and
central Poland later fought for Is-
raeli independenece, and many are
today citizens of Israel — as are
some survivors of German concen-
tration camps located in Poland.

Jewish Immigration
Into Canada Mounts;
;Israeli Figure Doubles

OTTAWA (JTA)—A total of
2,091 Jews entered Canada in the
first six months of 1967 according
to immigration statistics for the
period made public here by the
1Department of Manpower and Im-
migration. The total compares to
1,197 for the same period in 1966.
Of the total, 1,074 gave Israel as
the country of last permanent resi-
dence. In 1966, 508 listed Israel.
Canada's total immigration in the
six-month period was 83,108.

RABBI MILTON ARM

WILL PREACH AT THE

AHAVAS ACHIM
ROSH HASHANAH SERVICES

IN SOUTHFIELD 21100 W. 12 MILE ROAD

FOR TICKETS CALL UN 4-6428

YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREENFIELD

15140 W. 10 MILE RD., OAK PARK

Invites our neighbors to join us in worship for the
High Holydays — Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur
in our newly enlarged, air-conditioned synagogue.

Ticket Committee will be available: 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.,
Monday thru Thursday, 10 a.m. 'til noon Sunday.

FOR INFORMATION CALL:

LI 1-4575

or

398-0222

THE BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE

Is a Pioneer Congregation in a New Concept

of Jewish Religion Called

HUMANISTIC JUDAISM

The philosophy is a bold attempt to merge the best ethical and
aesthetic traditions of the Jewish past with the scientific integrity
of the twentieth century.

ROSH HASHANA AND
YOM KIPPUR SERVICES

of the Birmingham Temple will be held at the Robert Frost
School, Scotia at Nine Mile Road.

If you desire to attend please call the Temple Office 644-6632
to make your reservation. There is no fee for admission. Your
interest in a humanistic Judaism is the only requirement.

Bukharan Jewry in USSR

By BEN AMI

But with affluence and pros-

Editor's Note: This is the sixth perity came assimilation to and
installment of the serialized por- emulation of the social mores of
tions from "Between Hammer and the surrounding wealthy Moslem
Sickle" by Ben Ami, an expose of society. During the 18th Century,
Russian oppression, published by a number of rabbis and seho-
the Jewish Publication Society of lars came to the Bukharan Jew-
ish communities on a mission
America. Next's week's installment
from the Jews of the Ottoman
will describe the deep roots with
Jewishness that still exist among empire. It was these men who
saved Bukharan Jewry and re-
the Jews of Russia.

tion of Bukharan Jews to Palestine
was initiated at the end of the last
century. They went mainly to Jeru-
salem, where they built one of the
first modern quarters outside the
walls of the ancient city. In the
twenties the new Soviet regime
abrogated the Zionist movement,
and closed down every existing
Jewish institution and organization.
Once again, the family preserv-
ed' the cultural, religious, and na-

tional traditions. And because the
national movement had undergone

turned it to the turned
mainstream of
extensive development among Buk-
The Oriental Jews who live in
Judaism.
haran Jews, they had something
the Soviet republics of Central
During the 19th Century, the concrete to hold on to and to trans-
Asia, particularly Usbekistan, are
collectively referred to as Bukha- lands of this region were conquer- mit from generation to generation
ran Jaws. The name derives from ed and annexed to the Russian em- —more so than has been the case
the fact that for centuries their pire. For the first time the Buk- among other Oriental Jewish com-
cultural center was in the Empire haran Jews encountered the highly munities.
During the Soviet regime, young
of Bukhara and
in its capital, cultural and religious
Bukhara.
developed
civilization of Ashkenazi Jewry. Jews began to enter the profes-
and now many are engineers,
sions
The
Bukharan
Jews
were
ready
to
There are about 80,000 of them
today. Some 50,000 live in the Re- absorb the new trends which were doctors, and technicians. At the
same
time, many Jews found their
then
beginning
to
develop
among
public of Uzbekistan, with large
communities in Tashkent (the capi- the Jews of Russia. A Bukharan way back into government-owned
and industry—cotton, wool,
trade
tal), Samarkand, Bukhara, Kok- Jewish cultural and national-Zion-
and, Khiva, and other smaller ist renaissance took place in the cloth, and carpets.
Today, when you ,visit the large
towns. The remaining Bukharan late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Jews live in the Tajik Republic, Modern Hebrew schools were open- government bazaar or the stores of
mostly in its capital, Dushanbe ed, youth movements were organiz- Samarkand, you can see that most
(formerly Stalinbad); in the Turk- ed, sports clubs were established, of the officials and salesmen are
men Republic, mainly' in its capi- and so on. A systematic emigra- Bukharan Jews.
tal, Ashkhabad; and in the Kazakh
and Kirghiz Republics.
While the Georgian Jews have
lived for generations among Chris-
tians, and the Mountain Jews
among small and isolated tribes,
party Christian but mainly Mos-
lem, the Bukharan Jews lived for
most of their history in a society
which was overwhelmingly Mos-
lem. They, too, claim descent from
the ten lost tribes.
We find in the Book of Esther
a distant echo of the wide dis-
persion of Jews within the an-
The officers and members of
cient world. We are told that
Jewish communities were to be
found in the "127 provinces .
from India to Ethiopia': of the
Persian empire. It may be as-
cordially invite you to tour our
sumed that after the campaigns
of Alexander the Great in Bac-
beautiful
new
sanctuary, school and social facilities.
tria and Transoxiana, and the
consequent expansion of com-
Tours will be conducted from now until the
merce between the lands of the
Mediterranean basin and the
high holidays on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Far East, the Jews established
themselves as merchants and
middlemen in the centers of
Memberships are now available.
these civilizations. One of these
centers is the region of which
Please inquire at the Synagogue office at
we are speaking.
There is ample written evidence
24350 Southfield Rd., Southfield, Mich.
to the effect that prosperous and
or call EL. 6-8210 — 444-1510
well-established Jewish communi-
ties existed in this region during
the period when it Was under Mos-
lem influence. Prosperity and cul-
tural expansion were restored in
the region after the dark age which
followed the Mongol invasions of
the 13th Century. Large cities were
rebuilt along the "Silk Road,"
which led from the Medditerranean
to the Far East. International com-
merce was revived and educational,
scientific, and religious academies
were established. From the 14th
through the 16th Centuries, Samar-
kand and Bukhara were magnifi-
cent centers of culture. Their cul-
ture was, in fact, an integral part
of the great Persian-Islamic civili-
zation of the Middle Ages.
During that period the Jewish
communities grew and prospered
in the cities of the various princi-
palities and emirates; Bukharan
Jewish poets and writers created
a regilious and secular literature
in Hebrew and Persian; Hebrew
characters as their secular lan-
8100 WEST SEVEN MILE ROAD
guage; and, finally, they began to
TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE IN
settle in the large cities and to
trade mainly in cloth, silk, woven
materials, and carpets.
and limited seats still available in our
Unlike the Georgian and Moun-
tain Jews, who were also mer-
chants but lived among compara-
Officiating in Main Sanctuary:
tively small and isolated communi-
Rabbi Israel I. Halpern
ties, the Bukharan Jews were, for
Cantor Shabtai Ackerman
many centuries, people of the
Choir directed by Israel Fuchs
great, colorful, and lively Oriental
In Nusbaum Hall:
bazaars, like their brethren in Is-
Rabbi Martin J. Tatelbaum
fahan, Shiraz, and Meshed in Per-
Cantor Bernard Lipschitz
sia. They organized and financed
OFFICE HOURS: Doily 9:00 A.M.-4:30 P.M.; 5:30 - 7:30 P.M.
caravans from India and China to
Sunday 10:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.
the Mediterranean ports and to
For information on new memberships, High Holyclay seats and Hebrew
Europe. They owned large stock-
School Registration coil Synagogue office.
piles of wool and other raw ma-
UN 1-6696
terials for industry and were an
essential element in the economy
Public Selichot Services Sot., Sept. 30, 1967
and in the internal and interna-
of 12:45 A.M. (Daylight Time) No Tickets Required
tional commerce of the region.

Congregation Bnai David

HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES

Aiiiiu

AHANI
BETH
SYNAGOGUE

NUSBAUM HALL

MAIN SANCTUARY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan