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September 08, 1967 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Eutzel Award Will Be Presented
at Federation Meeting Sept. 27

The 41',1 annual meeting of the
Jewish Welfare Federation will be
held Wednesday, Seot.. Ityman
Safran. pre,ident. announced this
week
A reception )is scheduled for 6
p.m at the Jewish Center ,to be
followed by dinner in Shiffman
Ilall
Highlight of the meeting will be
.
the awarding of the Fred
Butzel Memorial Award for d,s-
tinguished communal service.

.

Regarded! since its inception in
1951 as the highest honor an in-
dividual in the Detroit .Jewish
community can receive. the re-
cipient is selected by a commit-
tee of 'presidents of Federation
member agencies and former
award winners.
Butzel Award winners tee date
1951: Henry
are Julian 11. Kr

\\lineman , 1952: William Fried-
man. 1953: Abraham Srere, 1954:
Mrs. Joseph II. Ehrlich, 1955:
Samuel II. Ruhiner, 1956; Henry
M. Butzel, 1957: Abe Basle, 1958:
Sidney J. Allen. 1959: Theodore
Levin. 1960: Irwin I. Cohn, 1961:
MN. Henry Wineman, 1962; Leon-
arci N. Simons. 1963: Max M.
Fisher. 1964: Nate S. Shapero.
1965. and Morris Garvett, 1966.
Tribute will be paid at the
meeting to the Jewish Home for
Aged which was incorporated
in 1907 and has served the
elderly in the Detroit community
for the past 60 years.
Reports on the results of the
highly sucessful 1967 Allied Jew-
ish Campaign and the dramatic
Israel Emergency Fund will be
presented at the meeting.
Election of nine members to the
Federation board of governors will

be held during the business meet-
ing.
Nominated for re-election to the
board for three years are Hyman
Safran, Dr. Peter G. Shifrin and
Mrs. Irving Steinman.
Nominated as new members
are Avern L. C o h n, SAmuel
Frankel. Joseph H. Tackier, Max
J. Pincus, Mrs. Arthur H. Rice
and Erwin S. Simon.
The nominees were selected by
a committee headed by Morris
Garvett and consisting of Paul
Broder. Mrs. I. Jerome Hauser,
Judge Theodore Levin and Mil-
ton J. Miller.
Other persons may be nom-
inated by petition signed by not
less than 25 members of Federa-
tion and submitted to William
Avrunin, executive director, not
less than ten days prior to the
annual meeting.

`Our Crowd Reveals Background and Emerging
Status of Major Jewish Wealthy Families in U.S.

Who were the giants among Jew-
isle leaders a generation ago and
what has happened to their chil-
dren? Ilave they vanished in a sea
of intermarriage and possible
apostasy? Have some of the War-
burgs and Lehmans anti Guggen-
heims and Schifis and Seligman!,
and Loebs retained their .Jewish
interests?
There is. a remarkable book.
"'Our Crowd . —The Great Jewish
Families of New York." by Stephen
Birmingham, published by harper
Rowe. that throws light on the
cohesive "crowd" that came from
Germany, amassed wealth. became
influential in the social. commer-
cial and political life of America.

Birmingham, author of five
novels, turned his attention to
the famous Jewish families in
this, his first non-fiction work.
He drew upon diaries, personal
reminiscences wherever he could
reach descendants, letters, news-
paper records. ' "Our Crowd —
thus became an impressive com-
posite portrait of the great fami•
lies, the bankers, the wealthy.
many of whom became interest-
ed in art, science, literature,
politics.

Paul Warburg. while

However. such extravagance was , other partner.
. a rpral re td.
pa ac uo i b vfLc r ne urrs es dago htrerr Ft! reil gra in
(
repugnant to the "crowd." More
ner too). This turned an aunt and
typical were the Guggenheims, . , her 1 ItIcs e birnottohrsrissteurs.-rtlaw
and made
,
who never seemed to understand
At . Goldman, Sachs, two S achs boys
about tipping when on their tray - married GoldmanrrigriVsidglIg
Dre y fus
els. As they moved from one
arGg partner), who was related by
grand European spa to another, (a
e n t i oi e c
aubgot
. rt the d a above-mentioned
ar ried
m
Sachs
gaend
tao
vengeful porters and bellhops
a Hammerslough whose sister was mar-
drew meaninful
smbols
y
in chalk
g
Roebuck
mpa..Ryo. selmad ltd soufrpSrfsatr.sity'
on their trunks and suitcases. The 1 's-!edCou'
Sears puts a new stock issue on the
never realized,1 , market
Guggenheims
s is done by Goldman. Sachs
though. why their luggage was al- & Company.)

Lnogs.

Negev's Agricultural Growth Boosted

The fruits of the Negev, whose development is being spurred
with the aid of Israel Bonds, are playing a role of increasing im-
portance in meeting Israel's food requirements. Here women from
the development town of Ofakim, northwest of Beersheba, are
shown grading and sorting grapes for shipment to market. The ex-
pansion of the irrigation network in the Negev, which has made this
type of development possible, has been financed to a substantial

degree by Israel Bond funds.

HEBREW SELF-TAUGHT

iv

b rown (maso.)

AHARON ROSEN

air .4 4

kiih-yeets

dress, put on (m.s.)

8,31'7 .4 4 7

blue (masc).

.4 4 8
0iZ
1.7

dress

& Company was founded.
- gilded ghetto" of their forbears. trkehneier
in 1876, as the result of a marriage.
/
when
Isaac Ickelheimer married Philip I 7 /la • ....
en saac
T e over-all
11 p ortrait of "The , w
At a West-
iteidemaeh's

Crowd" is perhaps best described ' chester party daughter.
recently, a Klingensteln,
1;1151 DkrrI
in the first chapter of Birming- i , related to Lehmans, and a Kemper.
related to Loebs, were asked if they
ham's story in which he describes weren't also related to each other, • I
the families and their attitudes as suppose so... was the reply.
i For many years Wall Street firms
follows:
such as these obeyed a kind of Salic

e':411 P

.4 4 9

1 33 .4 5 0

sv"

''Ph

.4 4 2

kah-hohl

loh-vehsh

The two founding fathers of J. S. !
w ays being dropped, crushed and Bache & Company. Leopold Cahn and , ' is angry (m.s.)
e
a
Serums Bache, were linked in mrriag
lost.
as well as business, with Leopold mar-
koh-ehss
For several generations, the sled to Semon•s wife's sister. Semon's
' She( tel.
son
Jules,
married
Florence
(m.s.)
"crowd" was a close-knit circle.
is h
asitter tof another Bache partner.
the tli
prim-
In tracing the growth of these
a rrte
nners &_ Co p
fta
meet- bah -
:
C h n
a ; I east"' four a
i p a I
great families, the author depicts 1 'c Bernard
Nlainzer, Casimer Stralem, and
garment
the change from its original narrow . Sigmund Neustadt—were similarly in.
to
married
Hallgarten
confines to today's generation, i tertwined:
be-ged
married
:, ■ .. lailgeeurcsta.slitsster,da ngtt Srstralem
Ileldelbach.
.
which has long abandoned the

ill. ???t1/1 .4 4 3

seem-lah

coat, jacket

1

7'377? .4 4 4

m'eel

long (masc.)

11'11.5 .4 4 5

ah-rohkh

11:11 p :

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trrtyci
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'ktin
7 1tP5 .1t?7 tr. 171"rit.0

avn rOmip ,t?v rup9 .;1P7,1 DPI)

trucq. n'vs?

The men of our crowd made their law, with partnerships descending only
fortunes as merchants or bankers or— to sons and sons-in-law. This dis-
in the now somewhat antique phrase— couraged outsiders and encouraged In-
as "merchant bankers." Their bust•
marriage. "In the old days on the
nets monuments include R.H. Mary & Street," says one stockholder. "your
Company (Strauses), Abraham & Straus relatives were the only people you
(Abrahams, Strauses. and Rothschilds— could trust." There was another rea-
•the Brooklyn branch" of the European son. In the old days, if you Were a
Itothschilds), and a number of cele- Jewish immigrant, the only person you
He shows how the first of their brated investment and banking houses could turn to if you needed money
in
Wall Street, including Lehman Bro- was a relative. For forty-four years
settlers were peddlers. some tilers:
Hallgarten & Company. J. & % V . after its founding in 1867, Kuhn, Loeb
"started on foot." others started Seligman A. Company: J. S. Bache & & Company had no partners who were
Rhoades
not related by blood or marriage to
with a wagon," the latter having company,
and Carl M. Loeb.
& Company. Families such, as the the Loeb-Kuhn-Wolff family complex
G ldm .
succeeded quicker.
Lewiiiohns and Guggenheims, whose for- For nearly fifty ye s ft
n
a pa e t
r tners
n were
are usually associated with min- Sachs was founded,
For many years. the Selignians tunes
tarinetdamberk s: mer
o. ma.;ionm
members of the intermarried Goldman
eli tt
nt tdas.
i in4 and smelting,
tri
families t .
.
The
Sachs
the tone of German Jewish
set
to
such as the Wertheims, moved from had hardly
seemed
y
— society in New York. But while
manufacturing (cigars) into banking riage at all; until 1924. nearly seventy-
founded,
t u
he, firm
five
a Le r ps. r after
atrte the
Seligman is remembered
Jose
wire named
For a long time you either belonged .
as foNoter of New York's first 1 ,t.„,..r,
ge rowd"
to
a or c
Two firms one might suppose had
as
ne' a i o nost you drirdrn n-
Jewish family in the 19th Cen- :
forebears—Kuhn,
d

r uIt :la
r7 NrmLeorfcre
sprunganfrrionL the
intramural when it comes Lo eb
hwy. he is even more memorable strikingly
,mo au kIs n ig dethrt crowd—lo the not.
L
a r rrcia r e.d
la
ii rg marriage,
not. The Loebs of Kuhn, Loeb are
for a business mistake, says Bir -
n ebts o taLrodel lri, Igroeeas —
kin to
klio
no kin
and tightknit as to be im- who
no kin to f
mingliam. In 1867, he passed up tiesive raabs oe. '
visit" bten• no kin to Gerald Loeb, the financial
we we . rviti
l .d
t
al:tudtto f t
the best bargain since Peter Mi- ranee. l also thT ehe pe' o l ",:
y•
noslorIttos for E.
!v
re first American generation, a num- C ompany,
nuit's original purchase of Man -
0 eainr who weir, a thrill-killing
f
fou nding v eas t. h e rjs. s e m r 1 VI i gt .
o
iii c t lofsoeu
team from
Joseph
-
own.
b T
i tiekdi
ys
e
wge
'
ti
t
3nrg
h ni
a
e
re
t7waN
hattan from the Indians. Ile re
Chicago.
Hier
IC.ligi
we'erraet i.f.irsloscroptssinstiattarnhd.
..If egen
it ndthrhisness

riz .4 4 1

summer

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?DR —
.10
ii'n•in
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Irx
net
t"nr,y?
,,ps.prs `71-1 —
711. ,?4,
? Tr? rpm.; 31???.i4
r.)3'??:4
nirrn .ri'vtrpn net — ring ,nip:
ter married Joseph's sister's son. Meyer up. even
New York
Times.
about
a
i a s ttersa
u by the most
which
n
piera
end
11"1*
stepsister.
roil
d
s
his
nLpg,
rge
dd
r.aarr
n m
cug igee:ih s e o lim
a
of
the descendants "1
suchm
h matters,
w
'7hP t rs??Pri.
•••Pt5
Solomon (Kuhn, Loeb) Loeb, an earlier
and had to go to Europe
to do
it
was at that
time,immigrant
and founder of the more
ortri
r,-1?ntp
13,47
te7
'
h
venerable house, are known in the

jected an offer to buy all the land
north of Sixtieth Street and west
of Broadway up to 121st Street
for $450,900 — a fraction of what
a
Hasdinghlee city block would cost now.
iii7iste re law in the United St e
e aresult of this mat - 11 316e s
decided differently, the __g:
his
atr . children
nclsetlyn.th
became a gre at- uncle
Seligmans would today easily be and his brothe e r's on
rnarried Walters. and several
richest
family
in
the
world.
therici
To
Thhe Seligmans also
marr ied nsBeers.
ing
aerel the Jwt
f doef.ft ru
make red-blooded Americans followed
the famigtag tete he n
wido w' s
five sons, Joseph Selig ma n marr
o f
sperogcess severa
ie d
s ni
a rt
-
D
ons
s
an
e
A.gin
lo
tl
ieh
g
u
n
h
a
n
e
r
Zu
owever,
Horatio
Alger
as
a
tt
n
b
e
cn
wo
e
abound!
oinsmhZsrted
iethn
caoluss
, l.
the creator of the boy-
H
ms
i e Lhoe bs,
im
s
Guggenhe
have
Lilienthas t,Gu
eyisopen hs,
he ro t of American fiction turned a
Leh m an s; Lehmans, who have
a timid soul in real life. ma
Out
Leh L m ans, e have in
ousin
rried
married Lee w hisohns, Butten-
adlition
n
t ant prey to the Seligman I ,,
A coonsn
Ickelhe' ers; Schel-
•is rs. e and
jokes, he would flee 1 heimers
boys' pr
; Stra-
have married Stralems;
T
from them uttering cries of "Oh, , s i iradst have married d Neustadt
-
Schiffs; s' Scli
v
s ;. VIr ors f .
n g. r h
LOrdy-me."
bi rsb
n nrst
and Wra
.rr.1n
e o v e sm ahhraarri d Loebs
y ; have

crowd as "the Real Loebs." Presum-
ably. the descendants of Carl M.
(Loeb, Rhoades) Loeb are unreal
Loebs. The Rhoades name came in as
a result of a nonmarital merger. No-
body knows quite why the name is
retained (there are no Rhoadeses in the
firm). unless for its overtones of
Scholars and the Colossus of the al.
most the same name. But by taking
a tortuous route through Lehmans and
Seligmans. it is possible to get these
each
two Loeb families related to
other, by marriage. .

What has happened to these
There are intermar-
dynasties?
riages. Some have suffered from
anti-Semitism, others have been
called snobs tantamount to being
burgs have marr ie
August Belmont was the may-
anti-Semites themselves.
..yorsde.,y have mnatrerrimedarrStealig a
r
crick, and in fact, neve
In the case of one - Seligman,
miLh
de
-
st
f
hin
e
n
wo
presents
a
desFg
m
of not w hledged himself to be part ree lin g
k
a
But
envision
.
ty.
thr
plexi
Birmingham refers to a death
"crowd." A protege of
cobweb i
dewy
notice
of his having been buried
jg
nfen
eattly ropm o
spelt sh of . grass. Each
o
on
r
the Rothschilds,
he became a
t
t ap.ri vda e banking after funeral services in Methodist
out dare sons
figure in American gen- ahnou
da t he ra diintgatt
rse:
uses
Christ Church.
s
n ds
ugners
ht, graon
a
His extravagance .
s a o li c t ie
tile society.
filamentf ss gadi
da ughters
There still are the Lehmans
s .
d his contemporaries,
. e moar t r g rt an uts:
was
o h e t t h a aee nryy are
scandalized
tie the '4% , 1 Io t ie d together
and the Strauses and one Warburg
Kuhn.
Loeb
21.,
Company
particularly his Fifth Avenue e
a ptlitticul ari n y t ht net
n k who are active in Jewish life.
h thLoeb
Ku
.i.h .) and
neighbor, James Lenox. W e
wo
,ik
r . of ln otve—w
Others either have vanished or
ere r brothers-in
Lenox was told that August t l ated tw
o Ab aham Wolff. another 1/1: are vanishing. The story of the
partner whose daughter married yet
Belmont spent $20,000 a month
A
Loeb
"crowd" emerges as a most reveal-
another partner. Otto X
on wine alone, he collapsed of
son married a Kuhn daughter. and ing book.
another Loeb daughter married an-
a heart attack and died,

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Redding material in vocalized Easy Hebrew, and also material for
advanced students may be obtained through your local Hebrew
Organization or by writing to: Brit Ivrit Olamit, i .0.B. 7111,
Immsalem,

Published by Brit Ivrit OW*

40—Friday, September 8, 1967

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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