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August 25, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thant Takes Israel Offer, Orders Bull Back to UN Offices in Jerusalem

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.—After
weeks of negotiations between Is-
rael and Secretary - General U
Thant, the latter accepted Israel's
proposal to allow Lt. Gen. Odd
Bull, chief of staff of the UN
presence in the area, to move
back to Government House, the en-
clave in the former Jerusalem no-
man's land which had served since
1948 as the headquarters of the
United Nations Truce Supervision
Organization. Under the pact, Is-
rael is allowing the UN to lease,
under a nominal rental, 7V4 acres
of the total Government House
area.
An agreement to that effect was
signed here Wednesday by Thant
and Israel's permanent representa-
tive to the UN, Ambassador Gid-
eon Rafael. In an exchange of
letters between the two, Thant re-
ferred to Gen. Bull as chief of staff
of the United Nations Truce Super-
vision Organization. Israel holds
that UNTSO exists no longer, since
the 1949 armistice agreements be-
tween Israel on the one hand and
Egypt, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon
on the other, on which UNTSO was
based, became defunct as a result

of the June war. In Israel's letter,
Gen. Bull was termed only as the
UN representative for supervision
of the present cease-fire lines be-
tween Israel and the Arab states.

Government House was occu-
pied by Jordanian troops on the
first day of the outbreak of
fighting between Jordan and Is-
rael last June. Israel forces re-

captured the UN enclave later
the same day, evacuated the
UN personnel for their own safe-
ty and gave them shelter in the
secure areas in the new city of
Jerusalem. Since Israel's com-
plete victory over Jordan, Thant
has been demanding that Gen.
Bull and his entire staff be al-
lowed to go back to Government
House.
Israel agreed that it would allow
Gen. Bull to reoccupy Government
House itself and about one third
of its surrounding area under a
nominal rental, and would also
give Gen. Bull's staff access to the
UN's radio transmitter. That trans-
mitter is in part of the area which
will not be turned over by Israel.
In announcing the agreement
Wednesday, Thant stated: "This
action is taken by the secretary-
general as a practical step only,

•■■••■=11•0■00

Boris Smolar's

'Between You
. . and Me'

and is without regard to or effect Thant ordered Gen. Bull Wednes-
upon the interest and position of day to move back with his entire
the United Nations concerning its staff into Government House im-

premises at Government House." mediately.

Yeshiva University' s 82nd Year Marked
by Involvement in National Issues

Seven Mile Roads.

NEW YORK — As Dr. Samuel ■ problems as air pollution, crime,

Last spring, too, New York
State proposed a state-wide con-
ference on programs to improve
the education of teachers for
service in schools with large
numbers of socially disadvan-
taged children. The state's com-
missioner of education, James E.
Allen Jr., asked Yeshiva Uni-
versity to help organize the
meeting and serve as host.

Early this summer, Mayor John
V. Lindsay of New York City set
up machinery through which lead-
ing social and physical scientists
on university faculties would be

called on to offer advice on such

"THE BRIDGE:" Since the creation of the State of Israel much
has been written about the "bridge" that exists between American

Jewry and Israel . . . The unprecedented emotional interest which
American Jewry has displayed toward Israel in the crucial period of U

the historic Six-Day War—and the huge financial aid it mobilized
spontaneously for Israel—testified to the strength of this "bridge."
. . - What must be remembered, however, is that this bridge had been
built long before the establishment of the Jewish state . . . Its history
goes back to the days of the Balfour Declaration, when strong personal
ties were woven between those who are now the leaders of the Israel

THE QUESTION: The leaders of the "Old Guard" both in Israel
and in the United States—who laid and strengthened the foundation
for the "bridge" now existing between Israel and American Jewry
—are gradually disappearing . Old personal contacts and influences
between Israeli leaders and American Jewish leaders are weakening
now with every passing year . . This poses the question: Will the
bridge between Israel and American Jewry be as strong in the near
future as it is today? . . . There are still alive today people like
Ben-Gurion, Eshkol, GoIda Meir, President Shazar and others of the
"Old Guard" in Israel . . In the United States, too, there arc still
alive a number of Jewish leaders who received their inspiration for
active work for Israel from the Old Guard Israelis . . . But what
does American Jewry know about the young Israelis who aspire
now to leadership? . . . The Six-Day War brought to the forefront
the name of Moshe Dayan as Defense Minister, but how many Jews
in the United States know that Dayan was once before a member
of the Israel Cabinet? . . . A military hero in Israel, Dayan has no
roots outside of Israel and never displayed much interest in develop-
ing personal contact with leaders of Jewish communities outside of
Israel . . . This is even more the case with other leaders of Israel's
Young Guard—with Shimon Peres being perhaps the exception . . .
Yigal Alton is a very able member of the Israel Cabinet, and is even
being spoken of as the coming Prime Minister of Israel . . But he,
too, is a stranger to American Jewry and even to many American
Jewish leaders, although he is very popular in Israel.



THE DANGER: At a party which editors and publishers in Israel
arranged for me in Tel Aviv, I raised the question of the future of
the "bridge" between Israel and American Jewry . . . Mr. Peres,
who had visited the United States when he was Deputy Defense
Minister, and who has great admiration for American Jewry and its
devotion to Israel, seemed to agree with me that something must be
done to keep the "bridge" strong . . . This was before the tremendous
Israel
and spontanous response of American Jewry to the needs of
in the six-day war . . . This great emotional response has proven
more than ever before that Israeli leaders must do everything they
can to maintain intimate contact with American Jewry.

Car Wash Fund-Raiser

Junior United Synagogue Youth
of Cong. Beth Moses will hold a
car wash to raise funds 1 p.m.
Sunday at the Metropolitan Sav-
ings Bank lot, Evergreen and

Belkin embarks upon his 25th housing and other challenges of
year as president of Yeshiva Uni-
of institutions
versity, the university itself starts one
urban of
life.
a handful
Yeshiva University
was
its 82nd anniversary with ever ! asked to provide assistance.
deepening involvement in national
problems.
Maccabi in Montreal
Last spring, for example, Abra-
The Maccabi Athletic Club of
ham A. Ribicoff (D.-Conn.) sug- New York, champions of the Na-
gested that America's great urban I tional Soccer League, will play
universities join in research and Montreal's Hakoah Sport Club in
community actions programs to Jarrett Stadium in Montreal on
bring both dramatic change and Labor Day. Proceeds of the game
social stability to the nation's will go to the Canadian Emergency
cities. He proposed that Yeshiva Fund for Israel.
University lead the way.

(Copyright, 1967, JTA, Inc.)

Government and Jewish personalities in America who sought to
strngthen the hands of those who fought for the establishment of a
Jewish National Home in Palestine . . . These ties became even
stronger when non-Zionst American Jewish leaders joined the Jewish
Agency for Palestine . . . The late Dr. Chaim Weizmann and the
late American Jewish leader, Louis Marshall, had long ago cemented
between themselves a bridge of understanding for Eretz Israel . . . So
did Ben-Gurion later by bringing to his side people like Judge Joseph
Proskauer and Jacob Blaustein who developed a genuine feeling of
personal friendship for him in the days of the "partition" discus-
sions at the United Nations at Lake Success . . . Supreme Court
Justice Louis Brandeis had felt close to the interests of the Yishuv
even way back in the days after World War I . . . Edward M. M.
Warburg—like his father Felix—was a friend long before the State
of Israel was proclaimed . . . So were other non-Zionist personalities
in the United States; not to speak of American Zionists . . All this
bridge of friendship was built on mutual respect on the part of the
leaders of the world Zionist movement and Jewish leaders in Amer-
ica . . . It developed largely due to the personal influence of people
like Dr. Weizmann, Ben-Gurion, Moshe Sharett, GoIda Meir, Levi
Eshkol and other "old generation" Israeli leaders who made their
impact on American Jewry.




THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, August 25, 1967-7

Arabs Press
Church Council

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

CANDIA, Crete — A state-
ment affirming Israel's right
to exist as a state but op-
posing "annexation by force"
was to be voted on Thursday
by the 100-member central
committee of the World
Council of Churches.
The council, representing
223 Protestant, Anglican and

Orthodox churches in more
than 80 countries, was em-
broiled in bitter debate over
the issue when delegates
from the Soviet Union and
Arab countries sought a
statement favoring the Arab
position in the Arab-Israeli

FINAL
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CASHMERE
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NOW
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', Alterations
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conflict.

Na

Commenting on the state-
ment that was finally ham-
mered out, an Arab spokes-
man said that although it did
not go far enough in con-
demning Israel, it "expresses
the Christian principles on
which we can all agree and
leaves the implementation to
the politicians."

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