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August 04, 1967 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Dramatic Tel Aviv Hilton Story
Tells About Notables and Events

Describing the Hilton Drama
during the first days of the war,
Miss Ruth Bach of the Tel Aviv
Hilton showed how the Tel Aviv
luxurious hotel was speedily trans-
formed into a war correspondents'
headquarters. She mentioned many
of the notables who came to the
Tel Aviv Hilton, how the upper
floors were vacated and the lower
were used to capacity and how the
dining rooms were reduced to
snack bars where services were
continued without interruption.
Miss Bach stated in her report:
"On June 5 at 8 a.m. the first
air-raid alarm was sounded. On
that day guests and staff moved
into and out of the shelter no less
than 8 times, including 3 times
during the night.
"As soon as the alarm was
sounded in the city, guests were re-
quested over the hotel's loud-
speakers to proceed to the shelter.
Elevators and electricity were shut
off, but on every floor staff mem-
bers with flashlights led the guests
by the service stairs down to the
shelter. There was no panic at any
time and everything went off
smoothly.
"The shelter was buzzing with
activity: journalists and photog-
raphers were interviewing and
shooting the people assembled
there—guests as well as staff. Com-
mentators of the major TV and
radio networks were holding on
to the specially installed telephones
and shouted their reports overseas
—everybody trying to get ahead of
h i s competitors in dispatching
newsworthy items as fast as they
came in.
"Many distinguished visitors

converged on the Hilton shelter:

Mr. and Mrs. James Tate, Mayor

of Philadelphia, paid a surprise
good-will visit to Tel Aviv and
brought greetings of support
support from Philadelphia, Tel
Aviv's twin city. The Ambassa-
dors of Britain and Brazil with
their wives had moved to the
Hilton shortly before the war

broke out. Barons Edmond and
Allan de Rothschild with a
French Parliamentary Delega-
tion of about 20 VIPs arrived
from Paris and found them-
selves in the shelter shortly
after checking into the hoteL
"Among the important press

and TV personalities at the Hilton
were Charles Collingwood and
Mike Wallace of CBS, Saul Bellow
(author of the best-seller Herzog),
Winston Churchill of News of the
World (grandson of the late Sir
Winston Churchill), Charles Doug-
las Home of the London Times
(son of former British Conserva-
tive Prime Minister Sir Alec Doug-
las Home), Sidney Gruson, For-
eign Editor of the New York
Times, Cornell Capa, well-known
Life photographer, and many
others representing all the major
radio and TV networks, news-
papers and magazines.
"Also staying at the Hilton were
several foreign guests of the min-
istry of tourism who had come to
confer on plans to build an Inter-
national Youth City in Israel.
One of them was Richard Haims-
ton, a Canadian, secretary-general
of the International Student Move-
ment for the United Nations. An-
other member of the Delegation
was British Member of Parliament
(Labor) Frank Judd.
"An American Peace Corps
physician came to volunteer his
services to help Israeli doctors.

He and his wife had come to
Israel for reunion with their
parents of Detroit who had ar-
rive a week before the war as
tourists. I would be glad to help
out, but I do not think my pro-
fession is particularly useful
just now . . . I am in the elec-
tric sign business . . . he told
us while sitting in the carefully

blacked-out Hilton bar.

"The bar became the meeting
place for press, TV and radio peo-
ple, high ranking Israeli officers
and other VIPs. Reports from the
various fronts were discussed,
unbelievable stories told, political
discussions heiu and predictions
made. It all seemed like a dream,
some of it like a nightmare.
"Commanders, Generals (includ-
ing General Odd Bull, head of the
UN Truce Supervision Organiza-
tion) and other important military
personnel went in and out of the
hotel lending additional 'glamor'
to the Hilton during these days."
Miss Bach made this interesting
comment:

"The client we missed is
Ahmed Shukeiry, head of the Arab
Palestine Liberation Army who
one day before the war told the
manager of the Ambassador Hotel
in the Old City of Jerusalem:
Next week we will be staying at
the Tel Aviv Hilton !"

He was promoted to assistant pro-
fessor in 1955, associate professor
in 1959, and professor in 1966. He
also served as acting chairman of
the mathematics department in
1959-60.
In his new post, Raimi succeeds
Prof. Morton Kaplon, chairman of
the department of physics and as-
tronomy.
Raimi currently serves as sec-
retary of the faculty senate. From
1964-66 he was chairman of the
senate's subcommittee on academic
honesty. Out of his work on this
committee came an essay on col-
lege cheating which was published!
in Harper's Magazine last May.
A native of Detroit, Raimi holds
BS, MS and PhD degrees from
the University of Michigan. He
held a Fulbright scholarship for
graduate study in France in 1959-
1960 and a postdoctoral fellowship
from the University of Michigan
in 1955-56.
Dr. Raimi is a member of the
American Mathematical Society,
Mathematical Association of Amer-
ica, American Association of Uni-
versity Professors and the Council
for Basic Education.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Raimi, 3361 Sherhourne.
Sonya, his wife, is the daughter of

.04

Her report gave credit for per-
forming most difficult tasks to
Hilton Resident Manager G. Gero-
detti and to the executive chef
from Switzerland, Marcel Roth.

;ft
# ,4 4

6 h1/4.

jilt"

Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Drews of
Broadstreet Blvd. He and his wife
and two daughters, Jessica and
Diana, live at 46 Glen Ellyn Way,
Brighton, a suburb of Rochester,
N. Y.

ABNER WOLF has resigned
from the board of directors of
Allied Supermarkets and has mov-
ed to Florida.

The Board of Directors of Bank
of the Commonwealth has named
E. C. A. FORSBERG as vice presi-
dent of installment loan division.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, August 4, 1967-19

THE NEWEST

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. GREEN-8 OPEN SUNDAY!
SHOP 12 TO 5 P.M.!

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY !
Saturday 9:30 to 9 and Sunday 12 to 5

By NATHAN ZIPRIN

the divine hands of Michaelangelo
— a symbol of the never-fading
values of life.

Ralph A. Raimi, professor of
mathematics at the University of
Rochester, became associate dean
for graduate studies in the uni-
versity's college of arts and science
July 1.
Raimi, acting chairman of the
department of mathematics for
1966-1967, has been a member of
the faculty since 1952, when he
was appointed as an instructor.

Green-8 Center Only!
Greenfield/8 Mile Rd.

Ziprin's Tribute
to Carl Sandburg

(A Seven Arts Feature)
Carl Sandburg was a great poet
in the tradition of Walt Whitman,
a rebel against form and conform-
ity, and an unsurpassed chronicler
of the Lincoln story and of the
Lincolnesque mystique that has
penetrated deeply into the very
sinews of Amer-
ica.
In verse and in
prose he was a
spinner of tales,
a dreamer of
dreams and an
architect of what
he hoped would
be the new Amer-
ica.
Though he liv-
ed deeply_ into
Sandburg
this century, the
prairie and theold frontier held
deep fascination for him. At heart
he was a man of the frontiers who
could look to horizons beyond the
fences—and that was the essence
of his greatness, of his impact on
his generation. Carl Sandburg, it
can be truly said, saw America in
all its dimensions.
It has been said of Sandburg
that he explained Lincoln to the
American people. That estimation,
in this writer's opinion, is a dero-
gatory formulation, since Lincoln
never needed to be explained to
the American people for Lincoln,
like Sandburg, spoke the language
and the thoughts of the people in
whom he was deeply rooted.
What Sandburg did was to create
the truths of the historians and the
biographers to whom the Lincoln
theme has been so dear — and
largely elusive — for more than a
hundred years. In the hands of
Sandburg, the figure of Lincoln
became what Moses had become in

Dr. Raimi Named Dean at Universityof Rochester

I

NOTE: Juliet can
be reached From
Greenfield as well
as 8 Mile during
the current r o o 4
construction work.

\ COUTURIER and FAMOUS LABEL DRESS CLEARANCE !

:1; were $55 — now $27

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $19

COUTURIER

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $19

DESIGNER

were $90 — now $45

GOWNS

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $19

were $110 —now $55

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $39

were $125 —now $62

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were $160 —now $99

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $39

Use Your
Juliet,
Michigan
Bankard or
Security
Charge !

Ai were $170 —now $99
VIII SATURDAY & SUNDAY $39

:1.

7N1

were $185 —now $99

I SATURDAY & SUNDAY $39

A

.1• ■ •



=17

_
•":70 4

„:"V,

were $150 to $225
Now $ 997

Saturday

and

Sunday

(

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