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July 14, 1967 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

24—Friday, July 14, 1967

Reporter Introduced to Israel in War
I-lopes to Renew Friendship in Peace

BY CHARLOTTE DUBIIV

A veteran Detroit reporter who
admitted to a "casual knowledge
of the area when he went into
Israel, came out with nothing but
praise for the Israelis and their
conduct during the six-day war
that he covered.
Allen Blanchard, staff writer
for the Detroit News, said the
Israelis put fewer censorship
blocks in his path than the U.S.
Navy, that not once did he see
mistreatment of refugees by Israeli
soldiers and that the attack on the
U.S. Liberty was an unfortunate,
but "honest" mistake.

In an interview with The
Jewish News, Blanchard spent
two hours describing his exper-
iences in Israel, moving among
Its citizen soldiers and among
the Arab refugees. Starting with
his original assignment aboard
the 6th Fleet carrier America in
the Mediterranean, Blanchard's
articles were carried in the News
late in May and throughout the
month of June.

was not the closing of the Strait
of Tiran, but Egypt's buildup in
Sinai. I don't think Israel would
have gone to war over the strait
alone."
Blanchard said he saw no evi-
dence of Israeli planes intention-
ally bombing a civilian populace
—only at Kalkiliya, at the foot of
the Syrian mountains, where "the
destruction was fantastic. Half of
the village was destroyed by the
Israelis." He attributed this ac-
tion to the fact that "they had
fired artillery shells on Tel Aviv,
and the entire populace was
armed. Egyptian commandos were
operating from there. The Syrians
had started an aqueduct to divert
the Jordan waters from the Banyas
headwaters right near that village.
As I see it, Israel had no choice."
Other than that, "there wasn't
a great deal of retribution by the
Israelis. They didn't seem highly
incensed or emotionally hostile to
the Arabs. They were afraid, but
they were confident, too. 'Poor
Hussi,' they kept saying about
(Jordan King) Hussein."

His objectivity gradually evolved
Blanchard, a Protestant, was
into outright admiration for the
moved by the Jews' reaction to
men he followed—"among the
the Wailing Wall. "I saw it with
most open, sophisticated and well
three Jewish doctors from New
informed I've ever seen"—through
York who had volunteered their
Syria. Jordan and the Sinai Pen-
services. None of them were
insula.
very religious, but they were
In contrast, "an Israeli officer
exhilarated by the experience.
at Kantara (occupied Egypt) told
"Coming back to the King David
me of one captured Egyptian Hotel, I was thinking that it
soldier who thought he was fight- shakes my faith in religion to
ing in Yemen."
see that in the city of Jerusalem,
Perhaps those most cruelly the home of the three main
touched by the war, as they have religions, they can't even be at
been during the uneasy peace, are
peace."
the refugees, The "old group," fed
Blanchard said he "can't under-
for years by the United Nations stand the fear by the Pope that
Relief and Works Agency and
something will happen to Jeru-
taught all their lives to hate and salem if the Israelis keep control
fear the Israelis, have been joined
over it. All Mayor Kollek threat-
by the "new group," those dis-
ened to do was clean up the Old
placed from the west bank of the
City . . .
Jordan and from Sinai.
"Actually," he added "winning
Blanchard said the night before
back Jerusalem wasn't just a
he left for home, Defense Minis-
religious thing. Jerusalem is the
ter Moshe Dayan called a press
rock of the state, as well as the
conference in hopes of countering
religion."
unfavorable reports on Israel's
Blanchard said he was particu-
treatment of the refugees. "He
larly impressed by the Israelis'
suggested that the heavy flow of "great national feeling. They want
refugees out of Israel was created to be self-sustaining. I got the feel-
because their finances were tied ing that even though they appre-
up in home banks. I find it hard
ciate the money from abroad—
to believe they have that much because they certainly need it
money; I just think they were
—what they really need is people.
blindly afraid of the Israelis.
The soldiers want people, not land.
"Where possible, Israel en-
They have a standing army of
couraged her Arabs, particularly
50,000 men; to hold the positions
administrators, to return home.
they now have would take a much
Those who wanted to leave were
bigger army."

furnished with bus transporta-
tion. It would be tough to do
otherwise without risking a fifth
column."

The 760th registered newsman

to cover the hostilities, Blanchard

does not share the impatience of
some correspondents with Israel's
insistence that they be accompan-
ied into occupied territory. No
statements of opinion were cen-
sored, he said, only stories of mili-
tary nature. "I had more trouble
when I was covering the 6th Fleet.
The Navy sent everything to Wash-
ington before I could submit it for
publication."
As for the Liberty attack by the
Israelis, "I was there when it hap-
pened. I never heard anyone
aboard ship suggest the attack
was deliberate. It's no wonder the
Israelis were suspicious of the
ship when the U.S. had been
making a big thing about it's being
far away, off Crete. When the
Liberty showed up off El Arish it
was immediately suspect. It was
an upsetting experience, but it
happens. The Israelis made mis-
takes with their own men, too.
They knocked out one of their own
tank units, about 13 tanks, in the
Sinai."

The reporter, now back at
his city room desk, said he
would like to return to Israel
as a tourist. "It's so western,
yet so ancient—quite out of
place in the Middle East.

"I remember, coming back from
Syria, an Israeli lieutenant colonel
wanted to show us the sights in
his little car. We went at night
through the narrow streets of Acre
—an eery feeling to be in the
ancient crusader fortress. And
then, suddenly, in one corner of
a market area, there loomed a bar
. .. and a group of men sitting in
front, watching television . . ."

Technion Group
Re-Elects Brody

Robert Brody was re-elected
president of the Detroit Chapter,
American Society
for Technion (at
its recent board
of directors meet-
ing.
Other officers
are Salman
Grand, chairman
of the board; Sol
Lifsitz, vice
No one, including the U.S. chairman of the
Defense Department, doubted board; Alex J.
that Israel would win the war, Etkin and Mur-
said Blanchard. "The 6th Fleet ray Hauptman,
had been briefed in advance vice presidents;
that Israel would probably win. Jack stone, sec-
"Everyone in Israel's military retary; and Sam
told me that what forced the war Rich, treasurer.
Brody

The Donald F. Rices
Honeymoon in Jamaica

g

evory

die Air

This Week's Radio and
Television Programs

LUBAVITCH JEWISH HOUR

Time: 8 a.m. Sunday.
Station: WKNR,
Feature: Rabbi Yitschak M.
Kagan will talk on the "Spark of
Judaism." The second in the series
of musical sessions with Izzy, Ner
and Zvi will be presented. A story
"From Days Gone By" will be
told.

• * *
MESSAGE OF ISRAEL

FOR THE BEST IN
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SAM EMMER

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Susan Rice.

HEAR OUR VOICE

Time: 11:30 p.m. Sunday.
Station: WCAR.
Feature: "Jan Peerce Singing
More Yiddish Folk Songs" will be
hosted by Cantor Harold Orbach.
* « *

HIGHLIGHTS

Time: 9:45 a.m. Sunday.
Station: Channel 2.
Feature: Charles Feinberg hosts
"Judaic Ritual Art" Menoras, tora
crowns, pointers, megila scrolls and
other synagogue ritual items will
be displayed.
and
Time: 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Station: WJBK.
Feature: "Martin Buber — A
Modern Encounter With Hasid-
ism," a dramatic vignette written
by Penina Frankel, will be pre-
sented by Leonard Bradley, Barry
Levine and Ricky Orbach. Rabbi
Morton K. Kanter of Temple Beth
El is host of the series.

Oakland University's MEADOW
BROOK FESTIVAL has changed
its Sunday series performance
time from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 in
response to hundreds of requests.
Grounds will open at 5:30 p.m. for
picnics and buffet service. Six
concerts are scheduled in the Bald-
win Pavilion for the week ahead.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday,
July 20-21-23, at 8:30 p.m., and
next Sunday, July 23, at 7:30, Six-
ten Ehrling will return to the De-
troit Symphony from three guest
engagements with the Philadelphia
Orchestra for the Festival per-
formances with VAN CLIBURN,
pianist, as soloist.
• * *
Pegasus Publishing Co. of San
Diego, Calif., is issuing a revised,
inexpensive edition of Frederick
W. Madden's "HISTORY OF JEW-
ISH COINAGE."
* * *
Oberlin Alumni Club of Detroit
will give a reception honoring a
celebrated alumni of Oberlin, so-
prano JANE MARSH, 9:30 to 11:30
p.m., Sunday, at Plum Hollow Golf
Club, Lahser at Nine Mile, South-
field. Miss Marsh appears this
week-end at Meadow Brook Festi-
val.
* * •
The Detroit Summer Theater's
third offer of its premiere season,
"MARY, MARY," which opens at
the Art Institute Auditorium Tues-
day, for a six day run, will star
the noted television personality
and actress Julia Meade.

"The History of Modern Israel's
Money" by long-time Zionist Mrs.
Sylvia Haffner, is more than a

catalogue of Israel's coins—it is a
document of a people's determina-
tion to revive their ancient heri-
tage under trying and harrowing
conditions.
Mrs. Haffner, the great-great-
granddaughter of Cantor Joseph
(Yossele) Rosenblatt, was drawn
to the history behind Israel's
money while collecting the coun-
try's coins and currency. She
points out that to collect the coins
of Israel is to be a part of the
restoration work being done in
Israel, as all proceeds go into the
improvement, restoration and
MRS. DONALD RICE
maintenance of archaeological
Ilene Susan Brandwine and Don- sites.
For information, Mrs. Haffner
ald Frederick Rice were married
at Bnai David Synagogue, with may be contacted at 6674 Airosa,
Rabbi Hayim Donin and Cantor San Diego, Calif., 92120.

Time: 8 a.m. Sunday.
Station: WXYZ.
Feature: Rabbi Bernard Perel-
muter of Anshe Hesed Congrega-
tion, Erie, and Henry Fliegler, the
temple's president, will discuss
Hyman Adler officiating. The
"Poverty Amidst Plenty."
* * «
bride is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert S. Brandwine of Hes-
IN CONTACT
sel Ave. Her husband is the son
Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday.
of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse A. Rice
Station: WJR.
of Cherrylawn Ave. and the late
Feature: A discussion of what
literary voices say about the Mrs. Eunice Rice.
The bride wore a rose pointe
world we live in and the future
Chantilly lace cage gown with a
of man will be presented by Dr.
high, rounded neckline and chapel
John Mahoney, chairman of the
train. Her shoulder-length veil of
English department, University of
silk illusion was complemented by
Detroit, and columnist for the
clusters of rose petals.
Michigan Catholic; Mrs. Lawrence
Matron of honor was Laura
Wember, librarian and secretary
Zuckerberg. Maid of honor was
of the National Association of
Carol Citron. Bridesmaids were
Jewish Librarians; and modera-
Barbara Citron, Judy Eisenberg
tor Hal Youngblood.
Joan Gelb, Lois Granadier and
* * *

Brevities

History of Israel's Coins
Written by Californian

Ronald Rice, brother of the
bridegroom, served as best man.
Ushers were Dr. Stanley Boykan-
sky, Jeffrey Brandwine, the bride's
brother, Richard Citron, Hadar
Granadier and Neil Saretsky.
After a Jamaica honeymoon, the
couple will live in Royal Oak.

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