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July 14, 1967 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Haber Reports Israel Desires Peace,
Urges Great Powers Not to Obscure It

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dr. William Haber, who headed necessities of daily life are already
a delegation of five to Israel to opening the mouths and ears of

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Israeli
officials began work this week on
procedures to permit the return
of West Bank Arabs under new
liberalized regulations approved
by the cabinet. An earlier order
permitting their return up to Aug.
10 was liberalized with the an-
nouncement that while the Aug. 10
date was the deadline for filing
applications, there would be no
time limit for the actual return.
The applications will be dis-
tributed in Jordan by the Inter-
national Red Cross. Former West
Bank residents who fled to areas
other than Jordan may also ap-
ply for re-entry to the West Bank
but their return will be subject
to Israel's regulations for re-
unification of families. Israel will
not admit persons considered to
be security risks or criminals
likely to disturb the peace.
Israeli officials expressed the
hope that the return of the Arabs
will begin soon after Aug. 10.
In Geneva, the International Red
Cross said Monday it had named
delegations in four Israeli-held
Arab areas to aid the Arabs. Is-
rael has given the Red Cross free

survey ORT activities and ORT
needs in the post-war obligations,
expressed confidence that there
can be a lasting peace if the in-
ternational community of nations
will stop fishing in troubled waters.
He said "the great powers would

be making a tragic error if they

allowed their rivalries to obscure
this possibility."
Harry Platt, president of the De-
troit ORT Men's Chapter, was a

member of the delegation of five
headed by Dr. Haber as president
of American ORT Federation,
Describing the several days'
visit in Israel as "both ecstasy and
agony—ecstasy is everywhere, the
agony is for the dead youth," Dr.
Haber reported that "the exulta-
tion arises less from having van-

--

DR. WILLIAM HABER

quished the enemy or the relief of
having destroyed the noose that
had been choking Israel for two
decades . . . but it is Jerusalem
that gives meaning to the event"
He described the emotion over
the reunion of the entire city of
Jerusalem. Describing the Hebrew
University convocation on Mount
Scopus, when Gen. Itzhak Rabin
was among those receiving honor-
ary degrees, he said it "etched in

my memory."
Dr. Haber said four questions

now stand out. He described them

as "The Arab Refugee, The Dia-

logue That Has begun, A New

Epoch for the Nation, Can the
Peace Be Won?," and he outlined

his views as follows:
"I am convinced that if they
have three to five years, Israel
will solve the problem of the
Arab refugees. I am certain
Israel is ready and eager to try.
The object would be to rehabili-
tate the refugees and restore
them to a productive existence.
The main aim would be to teach
skills and to involve them in use-
ful economic activity that would

restore dignity and put an end
to their refugee status. Whether
Israel will be given the time and

the freedom to act, only time will
tell.

When the walls of separation
came tumbling down, suddenly, at

those Arabs who are within the
areas held by Israel. At least in
Jerusalem, confrontation has been
transformed into dialogue.

"It happened that I was in
Israel in early May, just before
the crisis broke, the first visit
in several years. I was struck
by the expansion of the cities,
the marvelous new roads, the
rapid advances in every sphere,
especially in education. I was
startled, for example, by the
amazing development of the ORT
schools, their number, their size

and the growing sophistication in
what was being taught and bow
it was taught. But economically,
Israel was still in recession, al-
though Pincus Sapir, finance min-
ister, and others in authority
were assured that the direction
was up.
"Now, at least for this moment,
economics does not get first atten-
tion. To the extent that Israelis'
minds are sufficiently free to think
of such matters at all, they take
for granted that they can make a
go of things, once the larger ques-
tions of war and peace are settled.
"What dominates now, in place
of the former concern with econo-
mic development, is an almost his-
toric feeling of new possibilities,
as if the cumulative events and
heroic deeds had produced a mira-
cle that transcended the sum of
the parts. No one is ready to spell
this out concretely. But there is,
for example, real hope that a large
new immigration will arrive, some
from the West and some from the
Jewish communities still remaining
in Arab countries. The literally
thousands of youth from America
and Europe who came as volun-
teers in the wake of the war has
raised hopes that they are the har-
bingers of a new wave. After all,
it is a rare thing not often repeated
in human history, to have thou-
sands of people fly to a war zone
of their own free will. Immigration
would be a tremendous stimulus to
every phase of Israeli life.
"The greatest domestic chal-
lenge that Israel faced in recent
years was the absorption of the
mass of people who had come from
backward societies in North Africa
and Asia, the "Second Israel". It
is no secret that many Oriental
Jews felt alienated, discriminated
against, left out of the progress and
good things of life enjoyed by Jews
of European origin. That they lack-
ed the skills for better jobs and
higher earnings, that they carried
in their psychic makeups sets of
values and response that were out
of tune with modernity, offered
small consolation. And, it must be
said, there were some Israelis,
although I never met one in author-
ity, who felt unsure that the Orien-
tal Jew was really assimilable.

The problems of material pov-
erty and of educational deficien-
cy have not been overcome by
the war. They remain Israel's
most pressing internal necessity.
But they have taken on a new
form. The approach to the prob-
lem, when it emerges on the
agenda of concern once more will
have a new shape to it.

"I was struck, for example, by
the extraordinary proportion of
officers killed and the even larger
proportion wounded. In explana-
tion, I was told, that the Israeli
military language does not use the
terms advance or forward, which
is an order for others to go. The
word is acharai, which means fol-
low me. The Moroccan who is a
sweeper in a shop and whose sis-
ter is a maid in the home of an
Ashkenazi Jew, saw his officer
lead the way and take the first
bullet. The leadership was earned
by the hazard taken. In turn, the
officer who went out front knew
that his chance of coming back de-
pended on that Moroccan of lowly
place following loyally and depend-
ably. A bond of mutual dependence
and respect was forged on the bat-
tlefield. It will not be broken
easily. And the movement toward
equality of education and advance-
ment for the Oriental Jews will
have to move a lot faster. I do not
think it will be possible to speak of
the Second Israel any longer be-
cause Israel has found a new unity
among all her people. Perhaps the
way to express the change is to
say that Israel is no longer a con-
glomeration of immigrant groups,
but that all are now Israelis.
"The answer on every Israeli's

Israel Prepares for Return of Refugee
to West Bank With Red Cross Help

American Export Line
Canadian National
Steamship
Cunard Steamship Co.
French Line
Greek Line
Italian Line
Moore-McCormack Line
North German Line
Home Line

a nation that had been forced into
a garrison existence since birth, is
that even in these days right after
the bloodshed, they define peace
in terms of the advantages that
would accrue to the Arab peoples.
Nothing proved more dramatically
the effectiveness of the Israeli
mastery of modern technology as
the Six Day War, while the reverse
was only too evident among the
Arabs. The technical, cultural and
human skills possessed by Israel
could become a great reservoir for
progress for the entire Middle East.
Everything I learned convinces me
that Israel would participate un-
stintingly' in such a development,
because it recognizes that its own w
security and economic growth
would be spurred in consequence."

0

Establishes Seminary Talmud Chair

one stroke, the possibility for dia-

1

"It would be naive to think that
enmity will vanish overnight, or

mutual distrust and fear. The re-
lationship is much too overladen
with the events of two decades and
the dead of three wars. But if the
Arab states remain adamant, the

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of the barriers, this signalled that
the dialogue has begun.

Proof of permanent residence
in the West Bank prior to June 6,
when Jordan was knocked out of
the brief war, will have to be
submitted with applications for re-
turn.
A spokesman said no decision
had yet been made regarding
West Bank residents who left for
the East Bank on business or for
similar reasons before the war
broke out on June 5 and were
stuck there.

BOOK NOW

see the Six Day War very largely

the reunification of
Jerusalem has in reality opened
the discussion. When the Arab
multitudes poured into Israel in
the days after the destruction

The Red Cross officials have
been authorized to collect family
messages freely in all areas
under Israeli control and to
transmit them to Arab coun-
tries. They also will undertake
individual inquiries and re-
unification of families.

CRUISE HEADQUARTERS
FOR

as a step toward achieving it.
"But what is most astonishing for

pending,

access to the areas without spe-
cial permission.

DON'T BE LEFT ON SHORE

lips is that it must be. They are
prepared to give up a great deal
indeed to gain it. No one thinks
peace is around the corner, but
neither did I find any wish for
military conquest. The Israelis
have yearned for peace for so
long, as the one single thing they
ask of their neighbors, that they

logue emerged. Arabs and Jews
have lived side by side in many
lands, including Palestine, for cen-
turies. The unmitigated hostility of
the last two decades runs con-
trary to that history. The Mandel-
baum Gate symbolized the break
which made it impossible for Jew
and Arab to talk together. Prob-
ably the primary objective of
Israel today, in the diplomatic
arena, is to compel her neighbors
to sit at the table with her.
While that sought for goal is

Friday, July 14, 1967-17

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