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June 16, 1967 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-06-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ribicoff to Address Yeshiva Dinner June 21

Senator Abraham A. Ribicoff
(D.-Conn.) will be principal speak-
er at the 12th annual dinner of
Detroit Friends of Yeshiva Uni-
versity, Wednesday at the Shera-
ton-Cadillac Hotel.
Sponsored by a committee of
more than 80 business and civic
leaders, the dinner will honor Dan-
iel A. Laven who will receive the

Laven

Ribicoff

Yeshiva Uni ■ el. sity Distinguished
Service Award. presented annually
to civic leaders in the nation most
outstanding in aiding the Univer-
sity's scholarship program.
Alfred A. May is dinner chair.
man with Nathan Fishman and Dr.
Jacob E. Goldman as co-chairmen.
David Goldberg is treasurer, and
Nathan I. Goldin. secretary.
Senator Ribicoff is chairman of
the government operations sub-
committee on executive reorgani-
zation and a member of the Senate
finance committee. In the past year
he has been prominent in conduct-
ing hearings on urban problems
and traffic safety.
Laven is a member of the gov-
erning boards of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation and the Jewish
Home for the Aged, and has serv-
ed as board chairman of Sinai
Hospital. Ile is the president of
Central Heating Co.
Honorary chairmen of the din-
ner. are Abraham Borman, Tom
Borman. Louis M. Elliman, Max M.
Fisher. Irwin Green. Morris Ear-
bal, Hon. Nathan J. Kaufman. Ed-
ward C. Levy. John E. Lurie.
Philip Slomovitz. Max Stollman
and Phillip Stollman. Nathan Freed-
land is chairman of the scholar-
ship committee. Serving as chair-
man of the dinner executive com-
mittee is Rabbi Hayim Donin
of Congregation Bnai David.

hiva University volunteered for ful that hundreds of Yeshiva Uni-
service in Israel at the outbreak versity alumni have been in Israel
since the creation of the State,
of the Arab attack.
'More than 100 were able to de- working in professions and indus-
tries,
and that the first American
part and are now in Israel working
in factories and on the land. Many to die in the War for Independence
more are planning to go to share in 1948, Moshe A. Pearlstein, was
an alumnus.
in the rehabilitation work ahead.
'-Close ties exist between Yes-
"First news of the attack
evoked an overwhelming spon• , hiva University and educational
centers
in Israel, including an ex-
taneous response from every
section of the University's five change program whereby faculty
members
and thousands of stu-
undergraduate and nine gradu-
ate schools. Students and faculty dents have spent a year at coun-
joined in assembling outside the terpart schools in both countries.
United Nations. Girls from Stern Yeshiva University's Wurzweiler
College for Women took pushkes School of Social Work was instru-
mental in founding Israel's first
into the streets and raised more
than 527,000 in less than two school of social work at Bar Ilan
days. Doctors, nurses, and stu- University.
Yeshiva University hoard mem-
dents at Albert Einstein College
of Medicine and Hospital volun- bers and other lay leaders were
the first and greatest contributors
teered to emplane for Israel as a
to the current UJA appeal: Among
medical brigade. The university's
vice president of science and them are: Charles C. Bassine,
$1,000,000; Jack D. Weiler,
medical affairs, Dr. Marcus D.
Kogel, has granted leave of ab- S1,000.000: Joseph Lubin, $500,000;
Charles Revson, $500,000; and
sence to all medical staff mem-
bers wishing to serve in Israel. many others in sums ranging from
$100,000 to $250,000. They acted,
The surgeon general of the Is-
raeli Army is an alumnus of as one of them said, in the knowl-
edge that "helping Israel helps
Yeshiva University, as are
Yeshiva University. helping Yes-
several members of his staff.
"Students were especially mind- hiva University helps Israel.

DAYENU

BY HENRY LEONARD

JEWISH ;416-TORY CHART

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Pioneer Stiegel Glass Wo r k in a Paperback

That American glass is, today,
highly prized for its beauty and
artistry is no mere accident of
history. In a long, unbroken line
stretching from Stiegel to Libby,
fine c r aft s m en have labored
against seemingly insurmountable
odds (a lack of public patronage,
poor pot-clay, a shortage of work-
ers, etc.) to fashion an industry
equal to those of the finest in
Europe.
Until the turn of the century,
however, critics and collectors
were surprisingly apathetic to
American glass. As late as 1900,
only one book existed on the sub-
ject: at that time, too, the wares
of "Baron" Henry William Stiegel
(1729-1785), one of the most famous
of all American glass-makers, were
virtually unknown. That this extra-
ordinary craftsman was finally
hailed for his artistry is largely
due to the efforts of pioneer his-
torian Frederick William Hunter,
in his 1914 work "Stiegel Glass."
The book ranges over Stiegel's
life, his work and the whole ques-
tion of glass-making in Colonial
America — techniques, types, fac-

News Brevities

In November. McGraw-Hill will
publish the fourth novel by a young
Israeli author, Miss Yael Dayan.
Her hook, DEATH HAD TWO
SONS. is a story set in contempor-
ary Israel and tells how Haim Kal-
insky. a man who was forced by
the Nazis to choose between his
two sons—one to live, the other to
die—is reunited with his son, Dan-
iel.the one he had rejected.
Yael Dayan, an officer in the
Israeli Army reserves, was to leave
for Vietnam recently, where she
was to work as a reporter for an
Israeli evening newspaper. She
changed her plans and departed
for Greece, immediately following
the overthrow of the government
by military forces there, but was
only in Athens a short time when
the rapid flare-up of the Israeli-
Arab conflict decided her to return
to her native country. She re-enlist-
ed in the Israeli army. Her father,
Gen. Moshe Dayan, is the Com-
More than 30 alumni of the
mander-in-Chief of the Israeli
University are residents in the
Army and the recently named Min-
Detroit community as rabbis, edu- ister of Defense.
cators, social work professionals.
*
physicians, scientists, and mem-
"Doctor in the House." a play
bers of various industries.
by Ted Willis. from the novel by
In a statement to The Jewish Richard Gordon, will be given by
News this week. Max J. Etra, the SOUTHFIELD COMMUNITY
chairman of Yeshiva University PLAYERS 8:30 p.m. June 30 and
board of trustees, pointed out:
July 1 at the Southfield Civic Cen-
"More than 300 students of Yes- ter.

to
I , •
f i

, and we still survived!"

THE COMMERCIAL REAL
ESTATE EXCHANGORS will offer
an all-day session on the "Theory
and Practice of Exchanging Real
Estate" 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
at the Whittier Hotel. Goldie
Levinstein, certified real estate
exchangor will be instructor. In-
terested brokers and salesmen are
invited to participate. For informa-
tion call Miss Levinstein, VA

2-9000.

* ♦

JOCELYN

AND HER GYPSIES

Authentic Gypsy Orchestra
Strolling Violins, Floor Show,
Concerts

GR 4-7638

Wayne State University Press
has just issued a volume dealing
with "occupational therapy in
milieu."
Lela A. Llorens and Eli Z.
Rubin are the authors of "Develop-
ing EGO Functions in Disturbed
Children."
The authors, who are associated
with the Lafayette Clinic and
Wayne State University, evaluate
group activity programs as well
as individual programs. Treatment
data is illustrated with charts
which will prove most valuable
to student of the disturbed chil-
dren's problem.

19th
century leader of Italian independ-
ence, was one of the first Jews
to serve in the first Italian Parlia-
ment,

Max Schrut

For Good Photographs
and Prompt Service
Call Me at

BLAIR STUDIO

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tary School.

S. Y. Agnon, 78-year-old Israeli
author quietly but firmly asserting
his determination to return to his
homeland "even if I knew I would
be greeted by all the cannon fire
in the world," was accorded an
emotional tribute, June 7, by more
than 1,000 students, faculty, offi-
cials and trustees of Yeshiva Uni-
versity, New York.
Dr. Samuel Belkin, the Univer-
sity's president, presented the
Nobel Prize-winning author with
an honorary Doctor of Hebrew
Letters degree, and stirred a pro-
longed burst of applause when he
urged him to "convey our prayers
to our brothers in Israel for
peace."
The throng at the University s
Nathan Lamport Auditorium, in
Manhattan, also rose in ovation as
Belkin expressed the hope that
"Jerusalem will never again be
taken."

Early Parliamentarian
Allesandro d'Ancona, a

ORCH ESTRA

Registration is at the Reading
Center of the Stevenson Elemen-

Yeshiva University
Lauds S. Y. Agnon

tory sites, etc. The biographical
section explains away a lot of
myths associated with the German-
born artisan, including his claim
to nobility.
The book was published by Dover
Publications (180 Varick, N.Y. 14).

CALL: LI 7-0896 or LI 5-2737

Southfield will include speech
correction for pre-school children
in its summer school program
beginning June 26 at Birney Junior
High. Regular elementary and
high school classes will be offered.

Disturbed Children's
Problem Viewed by Two
Authors in WSU Volume

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

22—Friday, June 16, 1967

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