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May 26, 1967 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, May 26, 1967-39

MOVIE GUIDE : oad

ADAMS

Grand Circus Park

OPEN 11:00 A.M.
WO 1-8525
Stephen Boyd • Yvette Mimieux
A genius plan to gi ve th e Royal Bank
e Royal tre atment
the

"THE CAPER of the GOLDEN BULLS"
51:37, 1:47, 3:57, 6:07, 8:17, 10:27.
Wed. Ladies' Day SOc

AMERICANA

444- -1,676

GreenfiNt81.3%;

A RETURN TO ELEGANCE
FOR ALL MOVIEGOERS
OTTO PREMINGER'S PRESENTATION

"HURRY SUNDOWN"

CAMELOT

W. Warrer281a . 5 t 0,1 „ rler

R

Special Selective Engagement
Roger Hammerstein's

"THE SOUND OF MUSIC"

Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer
MON., WED., THUR., FRI.: Doors open
7:00 Shown at 8 p.m. WED.: Matinee
1:30. EVE.: 8:00. SAT.: 2:00, 5:20, 8:40.
SUN. & TUES. MEMORIAL DAY: 1:30,
4:45, 8:05.

FOX
721T Woodward—WO 1-9494
"DEATH CURSE OF TARTU"
and
"THE STING OF DEATH"
All Color

Jane
Michael
Diahann
Fonda
Caine
Carroll
FRI.: Open 4:45; Shown 5:05
7:45, 10:30. SAT. Open 11:45, shown Doors Open 10:45 a.m. Free Parking
12;05, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15, 10:55. SUN, & LATE SHOW Friday and Saturday
TUES. MEMORIAL DAY. Open 1:00, ,
For schedule information call
shown 1:25, 4:04, 6:50, 9:35. MON.,'
WO 1-7917
WED., THUR. Open 6:15. "Hurry Sun-
WED. LADIES DAY, SOc
down," 7:05, 9:50. Short subjects 6:45,
9:25.
Extra Added Featurette
GRAND CIRCUS l' tar?c.raNlid0 Cli-3 (4'11
Open 10:45
"Herb Alpert 8. His Tijuana Brass"

_
Envy
Our envy always last longer than
the happiness of those we envy.
— La Rochefoucauld

Danny Raskin's

FRI. SAT., SUN.: 11:10, 2:40, 6:10, 9:35
Daily 12:45, 4:00, 7:20, 10:35.
Wed. Ladies Day SOc

LISTENING

"BANG, BANG, YOU'RE DEAD"

"THE SOUND OF MUSIC"

HOMBRE"

COL0116,6“.

FRI. & MON. Open 6:45. "Hombre"
8:50 only. SAT. EVE. Open 6:45
"Hombre" 7:05, 10:50. SUN. & TUES.
MEMORIAL DAY Open 1.00 "Horn-
bre" 1:20, 5:00, 8.45.

• •• • 4

ogileas/ 1..

liat ro 1.
wi sho— A Wway

CINEMASCOPE
a rr
‘111
f g.
COLoR8vDcLUxE
*
••
FRI. & MON. 7:00, 10:40. SAT. EVE.
9:00 only. SUN. & TUES. MEMORIAL
DAY 3:15, 7:00, 10:40.
*
a
Sat. Children's Special Matinee,
Open 1:00.

rriti,EArr FIE1

.1:12-0330

1 2 MILE' 1AT- COOLIDG

Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer
MON., WED., THUR.,
THUR. FRI.: Doors open
7:00, Shown 8 p.m.
Matinee 1:30.
EVE.: 8:00. SAT.: 2:00, 5:20, 8:40. SUN.:
& TUES. MEMORIAL DAY: 1:30, 4:45
8:05.

Pavilion of Judaism
Prints Souvenir Book

MONTREAL — The Pavilion of
Judaism at Expo 67 has prepared
a 24-page colored and illustrated
souvenir program booklet describ-
ing the exhibits and displays at
the pavilion.
The pavilion represents a Cana-
dian window on the impact of Ju-
t
daism on all generations and on
all beliefs. It brings under one
roof all phases and facets of Juda-
ism.
All proceeds from the sale of
the $1.25 booklet will be devoted
to maintaining the Pavilion of Ju-
daism. Orders may be sent to the
Pavilion of Judaism—Expo 67, Ile
Notre Dame, Montreal, P.Q.

r% THRILL SHOWS
Z B IM CHILLING HORROR

in COLO R



NIG

.4,10 QM

CuRsE

%

WO 1-7917

FREE PARKING

of lARTO

FOX

r

.

wor

.

NOW

"ONE OF THOSE RARE ENTER-

TAINMENTS! FOR PEOPLE

WHO REALLY LOVE FILMS,

SEEING THIS ONE IS LIKE

COMING HOME AGAIN! Forman

has achieved the, real dream of

all directors—to put, something on
the screen that looks like life it-

self. His Comedy is the best kind.

Forman's

gem is as natural as the

human race and as clever as cal- mh

culus. And the name of that game

is art!"



Newsweek

EXTRA!
ward-Winning
Short
Fri.: 8:10 •
Sat.: 7:00,
9:00, 11:00

Pitt ATTRAIOANT PARKING

Nut TO

Henry Yee's

(Copyright, 1967. JTA, Inc.)

FRI., SAT., SUN.: 12:55, 4:20, 7:50, 11:20
Daily 12:45, 4:00, 7:20, 10:35.

Plymouth Rd.
at Farmington Rd.
GA 7-0400 & ICE 4-6400
Special Selective Engagement of
Roger Hammerstein's

PAUL NEWMAN

Y

By HERBERT G. LUFT

HOLLYWOOD — Mark Robson
now brings to the screen the best-
seller "Valley of the Dolls," from
Jacqueline Susann's story dealing
with four women who reach the
pinnacle of success only to find
that they're caught in a land of
loneliness, with Judy Garland, Bar-
bara Perkins, Sharon Tate and
Patty Duke portraying the leading
characters in the Robson-David
Weisbart production for Twentieth
Century-Fox.
Robson started his career in the
film industry 30 years ago, as a
laborer in the property depart-
ment of the very same Fox studios
where he now is guiding a multi-
million dollar production. At RKO
he became an assistant in the

MAI KAI

MI: CENTURY- FOX Pmnn

111:31133

"CAPRICE"

'Valley of Dolls' and Other New Films

,
c2

Ve
0
.
Cement

STUDIO I

Llvernois at Davison • WE. 3-0070

ANNOUNCING: Our New Temple Room
For Sweet Sixteens, Showers and Private Parties.

FORBIDDEN CITY

An enchanting atmosphere and taste adventure you won't forget.

TE 1-0775

Free Parking

0

Al

TIIERE ARE TWO things tha
make advertising men more tense
and frenetic than so many other
business executives of the times
. .. One is opinionated clients who
insist on butting into carefully
planned campaigns at the last
moment . . . The other is sneaky
account executives who waltz off
. with half of the total billings at the
!drop of a competitor's certified
check . . . Advertising is the in-
valuable aid that lubricates Amer-
ican industry ... Maybe you think
there should be more "soft sell,"
and less shrill repetition and over-
claims? . . . Listen to these words
from a fellow sympathizer . . .
"The trade of advertising is now so
near perfection, that it is not easy
to propose any improvement. But
as every art ought to be-exercised
in due subordination to the public
good, I cannot but propose it as a
moral question to these masters of
the public ear, whether they do
not sometimes play too wantonly
with our passions." .. No, these
words were not penned by some
jaded TV critic in 1967, but over
250 years ago—in the year 1700
. . . The writer, Dr. Samuel John-
son !

editing department to emerge as
a cutter for Orson Welles, Garson
Karim and John Ford. In 1944,
Val Lewton gave him his first .
chance to direct a motion picture.
"The Seventh Victim," a horror
story with Kim Hunter and Tom
Conway. Yet, it was not instil 1948,
five pictures later, that Stanley
Kramer's - Champion" catapulted
director Robson and a Broadway
newcomer named Kirk Douglas
to the top of the ladder. Next fol-
lowed "Home of the Brave. - also
for Kramer, and "My Foolish
Heart" for Samuel Goldwyn. Mark
Robson has remained in the lime-
light ever since. In all, he directed
30 motion pictures, in Samoa, Eng-
land, Germany, Italy, Jamaica.
Fiji, Japan, Hon. Kong. Holland.
India, Sweden, Spain,
'
Morocco,
and the China Seas—in addition
those
guided
in
Hollywood
and
to
on location throughout the United
States. The most traveled film-
maker in the business, Robson has
made his motion pictures not as
run-away productions, but as
American movies photographed in
their actual locale. "Lisa" dealt
with the plight of a former con-
centration camp inmate and was
shot in England and Holland;
"Nine Hours to Rama" told the
story of the man who assassinated
Ghandi and was laid in India;
"The Prize" revealed events about
a Nobel Prize awards presentation
and therefore demanded the locale
of Sweden; "Von Ryan's Express"
recounted the adventures •of a
group of American prisoners of
war escaping from the Nazis in
Italy; "The Lost Command," from
the novel "The Centurians." re-
layed episodes from the war of
the French in Indo-China and Al-
geria.



Gillo Pontecorvo. another Jewish
boy who became a film director
the .hard way, this one in his
native Italy, was in town to present
to us his Academy Award nomi-
nation of "The Battle of Algiers,"
in which he wanted to show his
love for freedom and the futility
of colonial warfare. Unlike Mark
Robson's "The Lost Command,"
in which actors and glamorous
stars depicted the principal char-
acters. Pontecorvo's "Battle of Al-

*

*

piers" enlisted the participation
of the real people from the Casbah
of Algiers, Frenchmen and Arabs,
in the true setting of the historical
events. Thousands of natives roam
the streets and alleys in this al-
most documentary re-staging of
tragic happenings of the recent
past. Not a foot of stock footage
was used for the remarkable,
though often one-sided reportage
which kept Hollywood's profes-
sional viewers awestruck and gasp-
ing for air.
Pontecorvo tells me that he
made "Battle of Algiers" with the
same search for honesty and in-
tegrity on the screen as he did
"Kayo," the gripping concentration
camp story photographed by an
Italian company in Yugoslavia in
which Susan Strasberg portrayed
the central character of a young
Jewess violated and abused by the
Germans in a concentration camp
of World War II.
Alan Jay Lerner, author of two
of America's most successful musi-
cals, "My Fair Lady" and "Cam-
elot." will triple in brass as screen
writer_ lyricist and executive pro-
ducer of Paramount's forhtcoming
movie, - The Little Prince," from
the late Antoine de Saint-Esupery's
modern literary classic. An adult
fantasy, the yarn deals with a
prince from another planet who
ho
learns about life on earth from
an aviator whom he meets in the
Sahara Desert. Beneath the fairy-
tale facade, the work is regarded
as a penetrating and profound
analysis of human life. An "Oscar'
winner for "Gigi," Lerner, who is
heir to the "Lerner" ladies wear
department store fortune, is cur-
rently preparing for Paramount
two more of his famed stage musi-
cals, "Paint Your Wagon" and the
current "On A Clear Day Yte
Can See Forever," while Warc.;r
Bros. is filming "Camelot."
Stanley Kramer is behind the
cameras at Columbia studios as
producer-director of "Guess Who's
Coming to Dinner," in which Sid-
ney Poitier joins the beim, ed
couple of Spencer Tracy and Kath-
erine Heyburn, with Cecil Kella-
way and Virginia Christine in the
sideline. Sam Leavitt 'functions as
cinematographer as he did in
every successful Kramer movie.

S

Jerry Epstein's Screen Career

By HERBERT G. LUFT

(Copyright. 1967.

JTA, Inv.)

HOLLYWOOD—Jerome Epstein,
the 42-year-old, Ohio-born pro-
ducer of Charles Chaplin's "A
Countess From Hong Kong," flew
in from London to the West Coast
premiere of the Sophia Loren-
JIMMY SAPERSTEIN tells
NIarlon Brando screen comedy
about a friend who finally has
which was clobbered by the press
achieved an ambition he's nour-
in New York but generally had a
ished since 1954 . . . He just
good, though none too enthusiastic
bought a 1954 Cadillac.
reception in Los Angeles from the
Iv
1
A
reviewers, yet an overwhelming
MEMORIES are always the key- response from the public every-
note of conversation whenever where as shown by capacity at-
Aaron Kerbis and Al Rosenberg tendances of the paying customers
see each other ... One they get a inEngland and key cities of the
kick out of the most is of 30 years U. S.
ago when both were selling vege-
Epstein's admiration of the elder
tables together from a truck . . .
After going over a railroad track, Chaplin goes back to 1934 when
Al motioned Aaron's attention to the nine-year-old lad saw his very
"the wheel flying up." ... Sudden- first movie at a Brooklyn Roof
ly there was a kerplunk as the Garden, Charlie's "City Lights,"
truck tilted sideways . . It was which gave impetus to his own
career in the theater. When Chap-
one of their own rear wheels !
lin came backstage after his first
visit to Jerry Epstein's stage show
LITTLE ROBBY had never been 12 years later, he befriended the
on a farm before . . . Mom and dad, youngster immediately because he
Alice and Sol Joseph, recently took found in him the true enthusiasm
her visiting and left Robby to her so badly lacking in the sophisti-
own self for awhile .. . She soon cated Hollywood movie colony.
came running into the house—and While Sidney Chaplin, together
with g r eat excitement, cried, with William Schallert and Kath-
"Come quick, mammy and daddy ! leen Freeman, became the prin-
There's a great big pig lying on cipal performer in all of Epstein's
the ground and seven little pigs theater - in - the-round productions
I"
are blowing an d
throughout a period of five years,
Charlie himself added his specific
Chaplinesque touch to every one
Exotic Cocktails
of the stage presentations, from
"Rain" and "What Every Woman
One of America's Finest Restaurants
Knows' to the premier production ,
Featuring Superb Cantonese Cuisine
1 Mk. N. of Masonic Temple
of "Kitty Doane."
While Jerry Epstein was still a
3148 Second Blvd. at Seville Hotel
silent observer during the filming

of Chaplin's "Monsieur Nerdoux"
in 1947, he became Charlie's per-
sonal assistant for the production
of "Limelight" in 1951-52, the very
last picture made by the famed
showman before his permanent
departure for Europe. Jerry since
has worked on many feature films
and television productions in Lon-
don and Paris, with Chaplin on "A
King in New York" and now "A
Countess From Hong Kong," in
France directing Eddie Constan-
tine (also a Jewish boy from the
States). On his frequent visits to
New York, Epstein also staged
"The Millionairess" with Car ,:1
Channing on Broadway.

To complete the full circle of
Epstein's activities, he has new
finished a screen play from Elmer
Rice's "The Adding Machine," his
very first stage production cf 21
years ago; to be made in England
for Universal (the company releas-
ing "A Countess From !long
Kong"). It also will introduce
Jerry as a major film director to
the American public.

Nobel Prize-winning ph) si,
.
Dr. CIIEN NING YANG
honored Sunday night with Ya-:.:-
va University's annual Science
Leadership Award, a scroll hailing
him as one of the "theoreticians
of science who in challenging the
present enrich the future of man-
kind.•' The award, presented at
the university's annual Sen.-y-1. ,
Leadership Award dinner in
marl. , I
Waldorf-.Astoria
Hotel,
both the 10th anniversary of I'
Yang's receipt of the Nobel Pr
and the 10th year of Yeshiva t - r - -
versity's Helfer Graduate Set, — 1
of Science.

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