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March 17, 1967 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

28—Friday, March 17, 1967

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Editor of Jewish Observer in London
Dismissed by Zionist Federation

LONDON (JTA)—The board of
directors of the Zionist Review dis-
missed Jon Kimche last weekend
as editor of the Jewish Observer
and Middle East Review as the
culmination of a dispute in which
Kir-riche accused the Zionist Fed-
eration of Britain of censorship in
the Zionist Review, publishers Of
the ,Observer. The dismissal was
contained in a lengthy letter to
Kimche, which was released in its
entirety.
The letter denied that the dispute
with Kimche emanated from an
intervention 'last week by Israel's
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, who
was reported objecting to an
article published in the Observer
against Israel's Minister of Justice
Yaacov Shapiro. -
It charged Kimche with ignoring
instructions from the editorial
committee not to print an article
on unemployment in Israel, which
the committee considered "mis-
leading." The printers were ordered

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not t_o print that issue, and Kimche
was charged with repeated viola-
tions of an agreement of his duties
as editor.
In Jerusalem, Monday, the
foreign ministry denied that the
Israel government had been in-.
volved in the dismissal of
Kimche. The ministry' spokes-
man said -the issue was one that
concerned solely the British
Zionist Federation.
The foreign ministry's spokes-
man said the only action taken by
the government was a protest by
Israel's envoy to London, Ambas-
sador Aharin Remez, against the
Observer's call for the resignation
of Shapiro, and the periodical's
criticism of the Israeli judiciary
as a result of the secret arrest,
trial and sentencing to one-year
year prison terms of the two Bul
magazine.
President Shazar Tuesday night
remitted to three months the one-
year prison terms of the two "13u1"
editors, Shmul Mor and Maxim
Gilan, who will be freed one month
from now under the reduced sen-
tence.

-

Hebrew Teachers Return
After 2 Strikes in Canada

WINNIPEG (JTA) — After two
stoppages called here by the Fed-
eration of Jewish and Hebrew
teachers, who charged the Jewish
Welfare Fund's administration
with failure to go through with an
agreement for a wage increase and
retroactive pay, talks were re-
sumed here between the teachers
and the Jewish School Board of
Winnipeg, in an effort to straight-
en out the dispute without further
overt action by the teachers.
The teachers and the .Jewish
School. Board agreed three week's
ago to a twelve and one half per
cent wage increase. The teachers
contend that the agrreement had
included a clause to make portions
of the increase retroactive to Jan.
1, 1967.
The welfare fund, however, re-
jected the retroactivity claim. The
welfare fund condemned the stop-
pages as a disservice to the com-
munity and the students. After a
meeting, however, both sides
agreed to continue their negOtia-
tions.

,

PhonoGift Girls Really Know Their Numbers

By CHARLOTTE IMAMS
The "dishpan" hands d_oing the
work this past week at 18451 W.
Ten Mile have been dipping into
piles of pledge cards for the Allied
Jewish Canipaign.
. • ' .
It's a corps of women who. may.
have left their own work undone
at home so they Can call' other
women to persuade them that "$2
will buy. a pair of shoes for a
child • in • Israel. Won't you raise
your pledge :this year?"
• Operation' PhonoGift, in its third
year of existence with the women's
diYision of the campaign, is a two-
week thrust by 400 workers for
funds from 9,000 women in the
Metropolitan Detroit area. In the
auditorium of the Zionist Cultural-
Center in Southfield, they sit at
small tables ranged around each
wall-20-27 volunteers. working an
average of two _hours a day once
a week, and often more. Their
prospects are the small givers, who
can make or break any - campaign.
- -By the time the campaign is
over next . Wednesday, they will
have terephehed---or attempted to-J
all 9,000 *Omen.
-
In February, the division sent
out letters and blank pledge cards
to 11,000 names. Two thousand
reSponded. Now, the task is to con-.
vince the remainder.
It's not always an easy - task,
as a look at the folding table in
. the center of the auditorium
will testify. Next to the pretzels
and candy offered to fuel up the
workers, stand more than a
dozen plastic dishpans marked
"Call Later Today," "Moved,"
"Discontinued" and, the biggest
pile, "Refused."
A group not easily discouraged,
however—their motto, imprinted
on little signs at each desk, is
"Smile as You Speak" -- the
women of PliOnoGift try to follow
the example of their chairman,
Mrs. Ben Mossman, who keeps a
ready smile of her own.
She's part of the "hierarchy,"
the women's division officers who
chip in to handle the problem
calls, a woman who refuses to
' give because she has a complaint
about an agency, or the one who
insists that her husband gives
enough for both of them.
Mrs. Mossman, Mrs. Arthur Rice,
the women's division chairman, or
one of the other leaders often
soothe the ruffled feathers of the
former and stress to the latter the
woman's important role in the com-
munity.
While the biggest problem is
a lack of knowledge on the part
of the prospect, "actually, most
women are very responsive," said
Mrs. Mossman. "Very often, they
sincerely want to know what the
Allied Jewish Campaign does."
Of 11,000 prospects in the
PhonoGift division, 10,000 women
give under $25. Last year, they
contributed a total of $48,000.
Workers this year are stressing in-
creased giving to cover mounting
needs and operating Costs. "But
the smallest gift is appreciated
when it comes from a willing
heart," Mrs. Mossrnan added.
"Some of the cards are re-
turned with a note 'Sorry we
can't do better.' One old lady
sent in _$1 wrapped in a napkin.
These gifts I treasure."
No gift is too small to pick up.
. A motor corps, operating out of
nine depots in Detroit and suburbs
and under • the chairmanship of
Mrs. • Gerald Gerger and Mrs.
Miles. Jaffe,* is prepared to collect
on - any pledge, according to a
pre-arranged schedule.
Keeping at the heels of the tele-
phone Solicitors is a small army
of clerical workers, headed by Mrs.
Harry Frank. •
Mrs. Frank's six-day volunteer
week would make a teamster com-
plain to his union. But she runs
a tight operation, getting out the

:

Ditahited MAUL Sattlilq.
. •
*AIL g(011112, ? • • •

cards, literature and special letters
to suburban residents with un-
listed phone numbers. The mail-
ing's caught up for now. "Next
week I'm going to collapse," she
admitted: _
When the PhohoGift Days . are
over, Mrs. Morris Baker will
begin her job post:campaign
cleanup, the follow-through on the
pledges of• the preyious two weeks.
Why the PhonoGift? Why the
vast appeal by •telephone when for
yearS the • women's diviSion had
used the personal, face-to-face
, approach? .
"To put it bluntly," said Mrs.
Sidney Hertz, vice chairman in
charge of briefing, "we found it
was getting harder and harder to
find volunteer workers. For one
thing, the distances to Over have
become much greater with the
community moving to the suburbs.
"Secondly, •ve don't feel right
about asking a woman to go
'door to door. It's just not safe."
She added: "It's Still hard to
get volunteers."
Those • who come out, though,
find a certain camaraderie await
ing them.' "The ,sting of a refusal
isn't 'so bad when there are 20
of you making phone calls at the
same time," Mrs. Hertz said.
One long-time women's division
member working on PhonoGift for

-

the first time is Mrs. Aid Kushner.
Her husband made the bdoster
signs that cover the walls' of the
auditorium: "Care and Share With
Us," "$12.50 Will Buy a Layette."
She confesSed she left- the beds
unmade to come down • and Make
calls. • -
Mrs. °Kushner gets few refusals.
"You've got to use 'your imagina-
tion when you speak to ,,yoUr
prospect. Never use pressure,
and if they're antagonistic, don't
bother. The best time to call is
the _morning, . before they, go ,
for. the . day and again' beore
dinner."
Mrs. Kushner_ smiled as she
talked tO the next woman. The
sign on her desk read "Smile as
You _Speak."

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