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February 10, 1967 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Syria Keeps Snagging Talks on Other Issues

(Continued from Page 1)
being premier, Eshkol is also min-
ister of defense.
"When we found it necessary to
act against Syria," Eshkol de-
clared, "we employed tanks and
planes. When we decided, we act-
ed. We shall revert to the use of
arms in accordance with the re-
quirements and circumstances on
the merit of each case."
Eshkol warned the Syrians that
they were going too far in their
persistent attempts both to under-
mine the talks of the armistice
commission and their continued
acts of sabotage.
If the Syrians stick to the agen-
da, it is believed that there is
still a chance for a successful out-
come of the negotiations. But the
very continuation of the talks will
be endangered if the Syrian dele-
gates to the ISMAC meeting insist
on dragging in extraneous issues.
Israel has repeatedly and un-
equivocally stated its determina-
tion to consider during this phase
of the negotiations only the set
agenda, dealing with "practical ar-
rangements for cultivation of farm
lands and cultivation rights along
the demarcation line" between
Israel and Syria, agreed to in the
armistice pact between the two
governments in 1949.
Israel holds that that is exactly
what the agenda calls for and that,
not by any stretch of the imagina-
tion, is the agenda possible of ex-
tension to a discussion including
the fate of the demilitarized zones
situated in sovereign Israeli terri-
tory.
Israel's misgivings have been
exacerbated further by an article
in Ul-Thawra, a semi-official news-
paper in Syria, which called upon
ISMAC to "force .Israel to with-
draw from the demilitarized zone."
The article added that, if the
Mixed Armistice Commission
"failed to do so, it will have lost
sight of its responsibilities and will
be unable to discuss any other
question."
Israeli circles point out that a
direct Syrian threat is included in
the article, reflecting the views of
the ruling junta in Damascus. The
article had stated further that, if
the Mixed Armistice Commission
proved itself "incapable" of forcing

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Israel's evacuation from the de-
militarized zones, "it will have no
alternative but suspension of the
meetings."
Israel trusts that Gen. Bull, as
chairman of all three previous
meetings of the commission, and
chairman of Thursday's resump-
tion of the talks, would be able to
get Syria to adhere to the agenda.

Eshkol told the regular Cabinet
meeting Sunday that if it ap-
peared the Syrians had no in-
tention of using the MAC meet-
ings for anything but propa-
ganda, Israel would suggest to
the United Nations that the ses-
sion be discontinued.

Israel's concern over the lack of
productivity of the MAC talks was
voiced previously by Foreign Min-
ister Abba Eban, who told a meet-
ing in Tel Aviv Friday that he had
asked the Israeli delegation to be
"very patient" because "as long
as quiet continues, Israel will not
do anything to jeopardize the meet-
ing" but that, if the meeting con-
tinued on present lines, "it is pos-
sible that we may suggest to the
Secretary-General that we shall
return to the meetings when and
if the Syrians have something to
say on the agreed agenda."
At the third session, like the
second, Syrian delegates raised
other issues over Israeli protests.
After several attempts to induce
the Syrian delegate to stick to the
agenda, Gen. Bull ended the ses-
sion after an hour.
Israeli sources paid tribute to
Gen. Bull's impartial and ener-
getic efforts to keep the Syrians
to the agenda. They also indicated
fears that Syrian "obstinacy and
ill will" would prove to be too
much even for Gen. Bull's patient
diplomacy.
Before the brief session began,
the sources said that heavy inter-
national pressure had been brought
to bear on the Syrian regime to
induce a more moderate Syrian
attitude at the resumption of the
talks. The reported pressure has
come from foreign governments
and from the United Nations
Secretariat, as well as from Gen.
Bull.
* * *
TEL AVIV (JTA) — Two more
land mines, obviously planted by
Arab infiltrators, were found on
Israel's borders Monday, one, near
the Lebanese border, the other in
the Lachish area near Jordan. In
both cases, Israeli experts dis-
mantled the explosives before they
were detonated, and no damage
resulted.
The first mine was found by a
young Bedouin student at a school
attended by Israeli Bedouins in
the north, near Lebanon. Foot-
prints of three men were found
leading from and back to the Leba-
nese frontier. One set of the foot-
prints led right to the school's
front entrance. Israel complained
about this incident to the Israeli-
Lebanese Mixed Armistice Corn-

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mission. The second mine, in the
Lachish area, was made up of a
bundle of nine plastic anti-vehicle
explosives.
* * •
LAKEWOOD, N.J. (JTA)—Presi-
dent Johnson assured 500 Orthodox
rabbis, attending a religious con-
vention here, that the United
States "resolutely" opposes "the
use of force or threats of force by
one state against another" in the
Middle East area, and intends to
maintain that policy.
The President's message was
read Feb. 1 at the closing session
of a three-day parley of the Rab-
binical Council of America. Noting
in his greeting to the Council that
"we are all concerned over main-
taining peace in the Middle East,"
Johnson declared:
"The achievements of the Israeli
people over a scant two decades
have taught us all what skill and
determination can do. Israel today
is an impressive tribute to the
dedication of its people as well as
to the support of nations and
friends around, the world. The
United States is proud to be one
of those nations.
"For the past two decades. the
United States has been in the fore-
front of those genuinely wishing to
bring about a peaceful resolution
of the conflict troubling the Near
East. This is not easy to achieve.
but we must persevere in our
efforts to make progress toward
this objective.
"We have made it clear that we
will resolutely oppose the use of
force or the threat of force by one
state against another in the area.
We intend to live up to that com-
mitment but we must recognize
that, until basic solutions are
found, tensions are likely to con-
tinue placing the highest premium
on cool and far-sighted statesman-
ship. We must do all we can and
we must ask our friends in the
area to go that extra mile with
us in the unremitting search for
the peaceful way. I join you in
praying that peace may come to
all lands. I pledge our determina-
tion to work with all nations dedi-
cated to that goal."
* * *
WASHINGTON (JTA) — Israeli
Ambassador Avraham Harman
met Feb. 2 at the State Depart-
ment with Under - Secretary of
State Eugene Rostow. The meeting
was described as a routine discus-
sion of current matters of mutual
interest.

Orthodox Criticism
of Dialogue Rejected
by AJCommittee

.

NEW YORK (JTA)—Rabbi Marc
H. Tanenbaum, director of inter-
religious affairs of the American
Jewish Committee, rejected criti-
cism by a leader of the Rabbinical
Council of America who had ob-
jected to Jewish secular organiza-
tions engaging in "religious doc-
trinal dialogues" with Christians.
Rabbi Zev Segal, first vice presi-
dent of the council, made that
criticism last week at that organi-
zation's Mid-winter conference at
Lakewood, N.J., last week.
Rabbi Tanenbaum said - that
"Rabbi Segal and those who hold
his views have an obligation to
demonstrate that discussions of re-
ligious subjects between Christians
and Jews have, in fact, weakened
the faith and religious commit-
ment of Jews who have partici-
pated in such conversations."
He said "the evidence over-
whelmingly has been in the oppo-
site direction, namely that honest
discussion of basic religious dif-
ferences in an atmosphere of
mutual respect and openness has
contributed to a strengthening of
one's loyalty to Judaism.
"We believe that the time has
come for all responsible Jewish
leaders to abandon the outworn
cliches regarding so-called secular
agencies. The word 'secularism' as
used by the rabbi has no sub-
stantive meaning in the religious
vocabulary of Judaism."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, February 10, 1967-5

Harvard Law Grads Facing Job Bias?

Gentile applicant." She said she
always reminds employers that
state laW forbids questions about

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (JTA)—Re-
ports that Jewish students at Har-
vard Law School face bias when
they apply at the college job place-
ment office is under investigation
by the Massachusetts Commission
Against Discrimination, it was re-
vealed here.
Walter Nolan, the commission's
executive secretary, said the inves-
tigation would be extended to other
law schools in the state, although
there were no specific complaints
of discrimination.

religion.

Dean Erwin N. Griswold, of the
Harvard Law School, a member of
the Federal Civil Rights Commis-
sion, said that, while school policy
was nondiscriminatory, he had ap-
pointed a faculty-student commit-
tee to make recommendations to
spell out policies for future guid-
ance.

A great fortune is
slavery.—Seneca.

School and college placement
offices, he said, are, in effect,
employment agencies and per-
haps "discriminatory judgment"
had been exercised in servicing
applications.

This possibility, Noland said, had
been brought to the attention of the
Massachusetts commission by the
New York State Commission on
Human Rights, on the basis of an
article in a recent issue of the Har-
vard Law Record.
The publication quoted Eleanor
Appel, head of the Harvard Law
School placement office, who told
an interviewer that "there is no
question but that the Jewish boy is
slower to receive an offer than a

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