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January 20, 1967 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-01-20

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Allied Jewish Campaign Sets Another
High Record id. Gifts of $2,369,500
Made at Initial Leaders' Gathering

Hopes Sustained that '67 Drive
Will Reach Goal of $6,000,000

-

Aar"

Aimina at a high goal of $6,000,000 to be raised in this
b Jewish Campaign, a group of about 60 large
year's Allied
contributors, meeting Tuesday evening at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Hamburger, 27881 Lakehills Drive, Franklin,
as members of the "Pace-Setters" group in the drive, con-
tributed the sum of $2,369,500.

Marking an 11 per cent increase over last year's gifts by the
same group — in some instances these gifts marked four and five
increases over a period of three years' giving — these contributions
may have set the highest record for philanthropic participation in
Detroit's major fund-raising event by the top givers in this community.
Alfred Deutsch, chairman of the 1967 campaign, who presided
at the meeting, expressed confidence that "this good beginning
augurs well for our hopes that the $6,000,000 goal will be attained."

HE JEWISH NEWS

A Weekly Review

Vol. L, No. 22

6

I

of Jewish Events

17100 W. 7 Mile Rd., Detroit, Mich. 48235

January 20, 1967

Action by UN Brings Temporary
. E. Calmness; Israel Insists
Infiltrations, Sabotage Must End

Direct JTA Teletype Wires to The Jewish News

At the opening "Pace-Setters" campaign meeting, are (from
left) Maxwell Jospey, Alfred Deutsch, Max Shaye and Irving Rose.

With Louis Broido of New York, national chairman of the
American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, as guest speaker,
the opening event of the 1967 drive, which is considered traditionally
as serving unofficially to open the campaign, was marked by several
brief addresses by local leaders.
Max M. Fisher, national chairman of the United Jewish Appeal,
the major beneficiary from the local drive, emphasized the urgency
of current demands for action in behalf of Israel, in addition to the
numerous demands for service to local and national causes.
Others who shared in the evening's program included the three
pre-campaign co-chairmen, Maxwell Jospey, Max Shaye and Irving
Rose; as well as Hyman Safran, president of the Jewish Welfare
Federation; and Philip Stollman, national UJA leader and head of
the American Committee for Bar-Ilan University.
As chairman of the JDC,
Broido traced the world fam-
ous agency's services during,
the two world wars and de-
scribed the many obligations
still inherent in JDC's world-
wide activities.
Broido called the UJA
"the greatest instrumentality
ever created to raise funds
Louis Broido (right), guest
for human needs." He told
speaker, with the hosts at "Pace-
of the aid JDC, which shares.
Setters" meeting, Mr. and Mrs.
UJA funds with the United
and
Louis Hamburger (center)
Israel Appeal, gives to ORT,
Alfred Deutsch.
"one of the world's great
causes," yeshivot, relief and transit aims, and described the United
Israel Appeal as an agency that faces many problems while helping
fulfill the need of upholding Israel's hands in a time of serious
challenges.
"The UJA is not a philanthropy but a great humanitarian effort
for relief and rehabilitation," Broido said. He commended the
gathering for "caring" for Jewry's needs, and declared: "By caring,
you make a contribution to Jewish life."
Fisher, who introduced Broido, supplemented his speech by
indicating that the UJA must raise $10,000,000 more this year because
of the depression that has hit Israel and the need to provide many
services which are burdening Israel. He emphasized that Israel,
pressed for military action, provides fully for military needs, but
in other services gives $2 for every $1 contributed by American
Jews to setle immigrants from lands of oppression.
All campaign divisions now are setting machinery into motion
for the solicitation of 30,000 potential contributors to the current
drive. The official opening of the drive has been set for March 22.

JERUSALEM — Israel will "explore all political possibilities to prevent further de-
terioration" of the situation on the Syrian border, but "if all these steps do not help, we
shall talk to the Syrians in the only language they understand," Prime Minister Levi Eshkol
warned Tuesday night.
Eshkol voiced that warning in an address at Tel Aviv, before a seminar of Israeli
academic personnel affiliated with the Mapai Party. He went to Tel Aviv immediately after
his address to the Knesset where he had stated that the "next few days" would be de-
cisive in determining whether the Middle East pacification steps taken by the United
Nations and the major powers would help restrain Syria's continuing aggressions.
The premier told the seminar that Israel's army has been strengthened greatly in
the last three years. He referred not only to Syria's aggressions of the last three weeks
but also the three-year-old Arab campaign for diversion of the Jordan River waters so
as to deny Israel's use of Jordan River waters for irrigation of the upper reaches of the
Negev area.
"Our struggle against the diversion of the waters of the Jordan River sources is not
yet concluded," he stated. "The Syrians are still holding to their diversion plans, although
their preparatory work for diversion of the Jordan headwaters is taking place at sites
distant from our border."
Israeli political circles here noted Wednesday that, for the first time since the dawn
of 1967, two full days have passed in complete peace and calmness on Israel's northern
borders. This fact is attributed to two separate factors. One is the speedy and energetic
action by Secretary-General U Thant, of the United Nations, in insisting on efforts by
both Syria and Israel to halt further escalation of the danger of large-scale war between
the two countries. The other factor is centered on the heavy winter rains which have pre-
vented further cultivation of lands in the disputed border zones, especially in the - de-
militarized zones between Syria and Israel.
Observers here doubt whether Thant's intervention will result in lasting effects,
since it deals only with one specific issue, land cultiva-
tion, while avoiding the basic problem of Syria's continu-
ance of its avowed intention to press further aggressions
on Israel's borders and within Israel.
Israeli authorities view the incursions of terrorists
from Syria, with the use of Syrian material obviously
(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)
employed with the approval of Syria, as symptoms of
TEL AVIV—Israel and Jordan
actual Syrian attack. While noting that some of the
settled Wednesday, without resort
terrorists may be Arab refugees eager to start trouble
to formal complaints by either side
on Israel's borders, they pointed out that when an
to the Israel-Jordan Mixed Armis-
Arab government wants to halt infiltrations, as, for
tice Commission, a dispute over a
instance, such action as has been taken by Jordan,
clash between Israeli and Jordanian
the saboteurs can be successfully halted or deterred.
forces which erupted Tuesday in
Unless Syria curbs its anti-Israeli terrorist policy,
the Ramleh region, about 10 miles
south of Tel Aviv. -
which is openly avowed by Damascus, no lasting results
Each side fired shots at the other
are foreseen in the wake of the present temporary calm-
for about a half hour, with brief
ness along the northern borders. Under these circum-
lulls during intervals. There were
stances, it is feared here, the crisis regarding Syria may
no casualties on the Israeli side.
flare up agaih, perhaps even reaching new peaks of
Each side explained to the other
violence.
that the -firing resulted from a

Israel, Jordan
Settle Dispute

misunderstanding, and effected a
cease fire after about 30 minutes
of conflict.
(At Amman, Jordan's capital, a
military spokesman said that there
had also been a brief exchange of
firing Tuesday in the Nablus area.

Sen. Kennedy to Address Campaigners

Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts will be the guest of
. honor at the pre-campaign dinner of the 1967 Allied Jewish Campaign, Feb.
8, Alfred L. Deutsch, chairman, announced.
Pre-campaign chairmen are Maxwell Jospey, Irving
Rose and Max M. Shaye.
The dinner, a black-tie event, will be held at the
Sheraton-Cadillac with a reception for Senator Kennedy
prior to the dinner. Hosts for the reception are Abra-
ham Borman, Tom Borman, Alfred L. Deutsch, Sol
Eisenberg, Max M. Fisher, Irwin Green, Maxwell Jospey,
Irving Rose, Hyman Safran, Max M. Shaye, Phillip
Stollman, A. Alfred Taubman, Jack J. Wainger and
Paul Zuckerman.
Contributors who give $1,000 or more will attend
Sen. Kennedy
the Feb. 8 dinner. (Related Stories on Pages 5, 19)

Security Council Told of Fresh Attacks

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. — Israel complained
here to the Security Council Tuesday night against
Syria's two latest border aggressions and, at the same
time, called the council's attention to the fact that the

(Continued on Page 18)

Groner Unanimously Backed by Shaarey Zedek
Board of Directors for Election as Its Rabbi

Congregation Shaarey Zedek's board of directors
voted unanimously at its last meeting to recommend
the election of Rabbi Irwin Groner as spiritual leader.
Louis Berry, the synagogue's president, announced
that the recommendation will be presented to the
annual meeting of the congregational membership in
March for final approval.
Another recommendation of the board calls for
the appointment of an assistant rabbi.
Rabbi Groner has been active rabbi of the congre-
gation since the tragic death of Rabbi Morris Adler.

Rabbi Groner

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