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January 13, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

$125,000 Butzel Bequest Provides for Library
Branch Bearing Late Supreme Court Judge's Name

A branch of the Detroit Public
Library will be named in memory
of Judge Henry M. Butzel. -
A $125,000 bequest in the will
of the late Michigan Supreme
Court justice will enable the build-
ing of the projected branch which
has tentatively been set for the
Van Dyke-Kercheval district.

The late Justice Butzel was a
former president of Temple Beth
El, served as president of United
Jewish Charities, had been given
the Fred M. Butzel Award for serv-
ices to the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration and the community and
was a leader in political circles
(Republican) and a score of civil,
philanthropic and religious causes.

`The Source' in Paperback Starts
With First Printing of 1,250,000

One of the best-selling novels of
our time—"The Source" by James
A. Michner—will be published by
the Fawcett World Library as a
Fawcett Crest paperback in Janu-
ary. Fawcett has scheduled a first
printing of 1,250,000 copies in addi-
tion to those already published for
the open market.
In hard cover, "The Source"
(Random) sold 650,000 copies, ap-
peared on the New York Times
Best Seller List for 73 weeks, and
was a selection of the Book-of-the-
Month. Club. Fawcett paid a guar-
anteed advance against royalties
of $700,000 for paperback rights —
the largest sum yet advanced for a
fiction title.
In the Fawcett Crest paperback
edition, "The Source" is 1,088
pages, necessitating what is per-
haps a record paper order—a stag-
gering 2,044,000 , pounds.
In "The Source" James A. Mich-
ener turns to the drama of the
Holy Land—and brings to life its
enthralling story from the dawn of
civilization to the heroic days of
modern Israel.
Michener, born in New York
in 1907, lived in Doylestown,
Pa., and from there later made
his way across country. His variety
of odd jobs and experiences that
formed an important part of his
early education included traveling
the land by boxcar, working in
carnival shows and a chautauqua
company, and before he was 20
years old he had visited all but
three states in the union.
Michener entered Swarthmore
College, as a scholarship student
and graduated with highest honors.
He went on to- the St. Andrew's
University in Scotland and then
returned to teach at the George
School in Bucks County, Pa. For
two years he taught, first at Col-
orado State Teachers College and
then as assistant visiting professor

The father of the late Justice
Butzel and Fred Butzel, Magnus
Butzel, was a member of the
Detroit Library Board and served
as its president towards the turn
of this century. A library built
in his memory was opened in'
1913 at Harper and E. Grand
Blvd.
Justice Butzel's $125,000 gift to
the library is the largest on record
since 1906.

of history at Harvard University.
Subsequently he edited textbooks
for a New York publishing house,
a position he left when he joined
the Navy during World War II.
It was in the Navy that he gained
the experience and knowledge he
needed to write his first book,
"Tales of the South Pacific," which
won the Pulitzer Prize in 1947.
Rogers, Logan and Hammerstein
adapted the story into the musical
"South Pacific," which ran for
many seasons on, Broadway.
James Michener and his wife-
now live not far from his child-
hood home in Bucks County.

6—Friday, January 13, 1967

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Ignorance of Name Thedore Herzl Reported
Among Young People — Not in U.S., but in Israel

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

JERUSALEM — A debate on the
Zionism and patriotism of Israeli
Jewish youth took place in parlia-
ment Tuesday night in a parallel
discussion to that taking place at
the Wofld Zionist Actions Com-
mittee session at convention hall.
' T h e parliamentary discussion
was touched off by a survey which
purportedly showed that some Is-
raeli youngster's had never heard
of Theodor Herzl, Hatikva or the
Nazi holocaust in Europe. M. Ha-
zani of the National Religious
Party said that this situation was
the result of alienation of Jews
from Jewish tradition and apeing
of Western culture by Jews.
However, Education Minister
Zalman Aranne questioned the ac-
curacy of the survey. He argued
that intangibles like Zionism and
patriotism could not be measured
by surveys. He argued that envi-

ronmental influences, such as the
home and neighborhood, w e r e
more influential than formal edu-
cation for inculcating such values.
He asserted that the crucial test
of youths' idealism was army sere _-
ice and that the response to this
challenge showed that Israeli
youths were not lacking in patriotic
feeling.

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UNITED-BRANDS • OETROU. U. S. A. • 42 PROOF

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AND ITS AFFILIATES

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FESTIVAL OF JEWISH MUSIC

Coordinated and Supervised by

NICHOLAS FENAKEL
Cantor

JULIUS,CHAJES

CANTOR NICHOLAS FENAKEL

Conducting the Sisterhood
and Synagogue Choirs

Conducting the Ados Shalom
Chamber Orchestra

Sunday evening, January 22, 1967-8:00

Dayan Proposes Jordan,
Israel Join on Tourism

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Plans for
Israel-Jordan cooperation on the
exploitation of Jordan River water
and in the promotion of tourism to
both- countries were proposed here
Monday by Moshe Dayan, a mem-
ber of Ben-Gurion's Israel Work-
ers faction of the Knesset, Israel's
parliament, and a former chief of
staff and minister of agriculture.
Addressing a public meeting
here, Dayan said that a peace
agreement with Jordan could in-
clude provision or access by that
country to a Mediterranean sea-
port in Israel. Two weeks ago
Dayan said that a long-term solu-
tion to Middle East problems
might be a confederation compris-
ing Israel and Jordan which would
leave Israel with freedom of de-
cision in questions of immigration,
defense and foreign affairs but
solving all other problems in com-
mon.

HAROLD ORBACH
Cantor

ANNETTE CHAJES
Soprano

SIMON BERMANIS

Cantor

Special Soloists:

Rev, Larry Vieder; Sidney Resnick, Baritone;
Leo Mogil, Tenor; Eugene Zweig, Bass; and
Mrs. Bella Goldberg at the Piano

Introductory Remarks by RABBI JACOB E. SEGAL

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