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October 28, 1966 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Chicago JWV Leader,
Foe of Nazi Rockwell

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

CHICAGO — The Cook County
Coroners Office reported Wednes-
day that a heart attack was the
cause of death last Sunday of Dr.
Samuel Perlman, 60, a Jewish War
Veterans official and an active foe
of George Rockwell's American
Nazi Party.
Dr. Perlman, a member of the
JWV national board, was the chief
witness last month in a successful
suit filed in federal court to bar
Rockwell and his followers from
demonstrating near any synagogue
in Cook County.
Dr. Perlman, a dentist, said
that after a federal injunction
was issued, he had received sev-
eral threatening telephone calls.
There were also allegations that
Dr. Perlman had been physical-
ly attacked by two Nazis and
that he had reported the inci-
dent to the Chicago police.
However, the police said there
was no record of such a report,
and the coroners office, which said
Dr. Perlman had a lengthy record
of cardiac illness, reported that no
bruises were found on the body.
The coroners office also said
that no autopsy had been per-
formed because it was not con-
sidered necessary.
Dr. Perlman collapsed while
attending a Bnai Brith meeting at
Shaarei Tikva Synagogue. He was
pronounced dead on arrival at a
hospital.

James de Rothschild, 70,
Marries Secretary, 27

PARIS — Baron James deRoths-
child, 70-year-old widower, mar-
ried Yvette Honorine Croquet, 27,
a Paris secretary, Oct. 21 in a civil
ceremony here.
Baron deRothschild, a member
of the French branch of one of
the wealthiest families in Europe,
was previously married to the for-
mer Claude Dupont, who died in
1964. He has two daughters. No
member of his family was present.
The bride is the granddaughter
of a blacksmith. She has worked
as an usherette at the Theater de
Paris, where she met the baron
four years ago.

Dr. Irving Zeitlin to Pay
Tribute to Late M. Haar

A memorial assembly for the
late Moishe Haar will be held 2
p.m. Sunday at the Sholem Alei-
chem Institute. Mr. Haar, director
of the institute for more than 25
years, was the principal of the
Sholem Aleichem School.
Speaker will be Dr. Irving Zeit-
lin, professor of sociology, Univer-
sity of Indiana.

Isaac Albert, Hospital Head

NEW YORK (JTA) — Isaac Al-
bert, an industrialist, philan-
thropist and Jewish communal
leader, died Monday at the Jewish
Chronic Disease Hospital, which
he served as president for 22
years. He was 78.
Born in Poland, Mr. Albert came
to the United States in 1892. He
had also served as a director of
the Hebrew Educational Society
of Brooklyn and of the Yeshiva
and Mesifta Rabbi Chaim Berlin
and was active in the Zionist Or-
ganization of America and Bnai
Brith.

Good and Bad Children

Children, you are very little,
And your bones are very brittle;
If you would grow great and stately,
You must try to walk sedately.
You must still be bright and quiet,
And content with simple diet;
And remain, through all bewild'ring,
Innocent and honest children.
Happy hearts and happy faces,
Happy play in grassy places—
That was how, in ancient ages,
Children grew to kings and sages.
But the unkind and the unruly,
And the sort who eat unduly,
They must never hope for glory—
Theirs is quite a different story
Cruel children, crying babies,
All grow up as cheese and gabies,
Hated, as their age increases,
By their nephews and their nieces.
—Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)

Henry Guterman,
Scranton Rabbi

SCRANTON, Pa. — Dr. Henry
Guterman, chief Orthodox rabbi
here for the last 57 years, died
Oct. 19 at age 83.
Rabbi Guterman had been the
oldest living graduate of Yeshiva
University. A renowned Talmudic
scholar, he had been a consultant
on Jewish law to the chief rab-
binate at Jerusalem. Yeshiva con-
ferred on him an honorary doc-
torate of divinity degree in 1962.
He was a founder of Scranton's
Young Men's Hebrew Association,
Jewish Federation, Central Hebrew
School and Hebrew day school.
Born in Lithuania, Rabbi Guter-
man was ordained at age 19 at
the Slobodka Yeshiva. A year
later he was ordained at Yeshiva
University.

Anti-Semites 'Tiny'
Group in Australia,
WJC Leader Reports

Jacques Bramson;
Directed ORT School

PARIS — Jacques Bramson, di-
rector of the 1,500 student ORT
school in Paris, the largest in the
ORT network in Europe, died here
last week. An engineer, he had
been associated with the Organiza-
tion for Rehabilitation Through
Training as a teacher and admin-
istrator for 26 years.
The school he headed, situated
in the industrial suburb of Mon-
treuil, is regarded by the authori-
ties and by educational specialists
as one of the foremost technical
institutes in Western Europe. The
building was a gift of the Inter-
national Ladies Garment Workers
Union of the United States.
In recognition of his innova-
tions in the training of adults
and his services in the rehabili-
tation of refugees, Mr. Bramson
received the French govern.
ment's Chevalier Du Merite
Social in 1958. He was the first
director of a vocational school
so honored. He also held the
Order of Commander in the
Legion of Honor, one of the
highest distinctions France be-
stows.
A fighter in the Resistance
against Nazi occupiers during the
Second World War, his courage
was recognized by presentations
of the Croix de Guerre and the
Medaillee de la Resistance.
During the last five years, he
turned his school into a center
for the economic integration of
North African Jewish refugees.

NEW YORK (JTA)—There have
been some anti-Semitic activities
in recent times in Australia, but
they have stemmed from a tiny
fraction of the community, report-
ed Nathan Beller, vice president of
the Victorian Jewish Board of
Deputies and a councillor of the
Executive Council of Australian
Jewry, which is affiliated with the
World Jewish Congress.
In a report to the World Jewish
Congress on Australia's 75,000
Jews and their community struc-
ture, Beller added that the import
of hate literature from abroad - was
under surveillance, in an effort
to use whatever legal process is
available to stop its transmission
through the mails. Beller said:
"We are of the opinion that anti-
Semitism is not a Jewish problem
primarily, but one that affects the
way of life, the liberty and free-
dom of every Australian."
The Australian Jewish leader
reported that the two main cen-
ters of Australian Jewry are Mel-
bourne, with about 35,000 Jews,
and Sydney, with about 32,000. The
remaining 8,000 to 10,000 Jews, he
said, are scattered in Perth, Ade-
laide, Brisbane, Canberra and
other centers.

Michigan's total land area of
35,494,080 acres is larger than
Greece, larger than Switzerland
and Portugal combined, and near-
ly five times the size of Belgium.

Friday, October 28, 1966-45

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Canadian Jews Label Novak's Acquittal
`Travesty of Justice' ; Israelis Protest

Supreme Court which ordered a
retrial.
The Austrian Embassy charge
d'affairs, who accepted the protest,
told the delegation that embassy
members felt badly about the
acquittal. The protest, addressed
to the president of Austria, was
forwarded to Vienna.
The World Jewish Congress an-
nounced it had received word from
Vienna that the Austrian Jewish
community has canceled plans for
the celebration of the Austrian na-
tional holiday Oct. 20 in protest
over the acquittal of Novak.
Instead of the planned celebra-
tion, the Austrian Jewish commu-
nity has scheduled memorial serv-
ices for the victims of Nazism. In
a message to the Austrian Jewish
"His acquittal is the most recent community, the American Section
of many similar decisions by Aus- of the WJC expressed solidarity
trian courts, indicating that a con- with the decision.
siderable section of the Austrian
population disregards the civilized
world's condemnation of Nazism
and racialism, and that the sha- Swastika Inscriptions
dow of Nazism still hangs heavily in Florence Call for
over the Austrian nation."
Release of Rudolph Hess
In Tel Aviv, a delegation of for-
FLORENCE, Italy (JTA)—Swas-
mer partisans and fighters against tikas with inscriptions calling for
Nazism presented to the Austrian the release of Nazi leader Rudolph
Embassy here a protest against the Hess from Spandau prison again
acquittal of Novak.
appeared in the center of this city.
Novak, Eichmann's chief trans- There have been several such in-
port officer, was acquitted for a cidents since two Nazi leaders
second time Oct. 6. An earlier were released from the prison in
acquittal by a Salzburg court had West Berlin recently, leaving only
been reversed by the Austrian Hess in prison.

MONTREAL (JTA) — The Can-
adian Jewish Congress announced
Monday it has joined the world-
wide protests against the acquit-
tal by an Austrian jury of former
Nazi SS Capt. Franz Novak, "in
full knowledge of his leading role
as a principal assistant to the
notorious Adolf Eichmann, in
carrying out Hitler's plans for the
mass annihilation of European
Jewry."
Michael Garber, president of the
CJC, at a meeting of the officers
of congress, declared: "In view of
the incontrovertible evidence of
Novak's complicity in the mass
murder of many hundreds of thou-
sands of Jewish men, women and
children, the verdict of acquittal
is a complete travesty of justice.

Do electric dryers really cost less to buy?
Do you really get no-charge service?

Former Detroiter Killed
in NY Auto Accident

Barbara LeBost, former De-
troiter studying for her doctorate
at Columbia University, died Tues-
day in New York as a result of an
automobile accident. She was 32.
Mrs. LeBost, a native of Can-
ton, 0., lived in New York three
years. She was teaching English
literature at Queens College and
was a 1955 graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Survivors are her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Kanterman; and
two sisters, Mrs. Marilyn Meeske
and Mrs. Leon (Patricia) Fried-
man, both of New York.

AJCommittee Leader, 57

FT. LAUDERDALE ( JTA) —
Julius S. Loewenthal, a New York
real estate excecutive and a for-
mer vice president of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee, died here
Monday night at age 57.
He was a former president of
the New York chapter of the com-
mittee, and a founder of the New
York State Committee on Discrim-
ination in Housing and the Nation-
al Committee Against Discrimina-
tion in Housing.

Yiddish Actor's Wife, 77

NEW YORK — Mrs. Slava
Estrin Ben-Ami, wife of Yiddish
and American stage actor Jacob
Ben-.Ami, died Oct. 20 at age 77.
A native of Moscow, Mrs. Ben-
Ami came to the United States
in 1914 from Warsaw, where she
The confidence which we have had been an actress. In New York,
in ourselves gives birth to much of she was a translator of German,
that which we have in others.—La
... Russian and Polish plays into
Yiddish.
Rochefouc ald

Do kids like ice cream?

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is backed by Edison's No-Charge repair service. No charge for any
electrical parts. No charge for labor. Edison is the only utility company

in this area that offers no-charge repair service.

Can you get this kind of worry-free assurance with a gas dryer?
Sure—with a manufacturer's repair service policy. But it will cost you
up to $120 over the first five years of operation alone!
One thing more. Edison's No-Charge repair service applies even if
you don't buy your dryer from Edison—so long as the dryer is electric
and you get your electricity from Edison. And if you buy now from a
participating dealer, the low price you pay includes the cost of wiring,
if any's needed. So when you add it up, an electric dryer can save
you up to $140 in just a few years. That can
keep the kids in ice cream a good long time.

EDISON

402—RD

311

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