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August 26, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-08-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1,000,000 Helped
B-G's Party Insists It Won't Return
Annually in Jewish to Mapai; Eshkol Faces New Woe
TEL AVIV (JTA) — David Ben- vations on many aspects of the
Service Agencies Gurion's
new political grouping, program.

NEW YORK—More than 1.000,-
000 people are served annually in
hospitals and clinics, family
agencies, child care centers and
homes for the aged under Jewish
auspices.
The health and welfare services
are supported by Jewish federa-
tions and welfare funds in com-
munities throughout the United
States and Canada.
The extent of service provided
'Y
these Jewish communal
lencies and institutions was re-
_ arted in the newly-issued "Year-
book of Jewish Social Service,"
published by the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds.
More than 70,000 families, with
a wide variety of problems, re-
ceive help each year from Jew-
ish family agencies. The year-
book noted growing emphasis in
the family agencies in develop-
ing new non-institutional serv-
ices for older people to help
them remain in the community
with as much independence as
possible.
Despite a rising number of beds
available in Jewish homes for the
aged due to new construction pro-
grams, many homes have long
waiting lists for admission. A
number of homes report virtually!
100 per cent occupancy through-
out the year, with the national
rate being 94 per cent.
The high occupancy rate not
only results in waiting for admis-
sion but also poses difficulties in
transfer arrangements with hos-
pitals and other facilities or serv-
ices whose patients or clients
require immediate entrance to the
homes.
The CJFWF yearbook points
out that the age of residents of
the homes, rising steadily over
the years, has reached a median
of between 81 and 82 years of age.
The trend is toward later admis-
sion with an average entering age
of over 75.
Title 19 of the Medicare Act
—which pays for medical ex-
penses of the indigent following
implementation by state legisla-
tures — likely will have a f ar-
reaching impact on the financing
and services of Jewish homes
for the aged, the yearbook states.
Medicare, the yearbook notes,
gives the Jewish community and
its agencies a unique opportunity
to work effectively in partnership
with the government in providing
the finest possible care to the
aged.
More than 18,000 persons are
cared for in Jewish homes for
the aged.
* * •
Some 650,000 in-patients are
treated at Jewish hospitals during
the year with an additional 300,000
persons receiving out-patient care.
Hospitals under Jewish aus-
ices continue to emphasize
ervice to the total community.
le proportion of Jewish pa-
tients in Jewish general hos-
pitals is declining. Slightly over
one-third of in-patients in Jew-
ish hospitals in 1964 were Jew-
ish, One-sixth of out-patients
treated by Jewish general hos-
pitals were Jewish.
* * *
In reporting on Jewish-sponsored
child care services, the yearbook
stated that a growing number of
children are being served in their
own homes through enriched coun-
seling and psychiatric services —
with greater parental involvement.

Oppose Bingo on Ballot

A joint statement by Dr. J.
Russel Bright, president, and Dr.
G. Merrill Lenox, executive direc-
tor of the Metropolitan Detroit
Council of Churches, expresses
strong and deep opposition to an
attempt by some advocates of
legalized lotteries to obtain leg-
islative approval for placing the
bingo issue on a referendum in
No ve raber.

Rafi, "has no intention of return
ing to Mapai, because there is no
Mapai to return to," Stimon Peres,
secretary-general of the new party,
declared here.
Peres, former deputy minister of
defense and Ben-Gurion's chief
aide in the formation of the group,
which had broken away from the
Mapai Party, made that statement
at a meeting of the Rafi central
committee here. He said, however,
that Rafi will not ban any "pri-
vate" efforts to bring about a
rapprochement with Mapai.
At the meeting Sunday night :
the Rafi central committee decided
to elect a secretariat, to consist of
31 members. Of the 31, the lead.
ers decided, the central committee
would appoint 19, while the rest
would be named by Rafi's regional
branches. Peres had been elected
secretary-general last May.
Meanwhile, splits within Prem-
ier Eshkol's Mapai-led govern-
ment were widening over the
three-year austerity pr o g r a in
proposed by Finance Minister
Pinhas Sapir to cope with Is-
rael's mounting inflation and
growing international trade im-
balance.
The premier invited leaders of
the alignment of his Mapai Party
and Ahdut Avoda to a "summit
conference" Aug. 19, to iron out
differences over the plan. He
hoped to present a united align-
ment stand on the plan to Mapam,
which has expressed strong reser-

Minneapolis Rioting Spurs
Jewish Firms to Move

MINNEAPOLIS (JTA) — Re-
cent rioting on Plymouth Ave.,
a section of the city once pre-
dominantly Jewish and now hous-
ing mostly Negro residents and
Jewish-owned stores, is bringing
about moves of Jewish institutions
and Jewish-owned businesses from
that area.
The American Jewish World re-
ported that two congregations in
the city are planning to move to
the suburbs. They are Beth El
Congregation and Mikro Kodesh
Congregation. •
In addition, it was learned
that previous but vague plans
for moving the Talmud Torah to
the suburbs have been ac-
celerated. Some parents of chil-
dren attending the Talmud Tora
have notified officials of the
institution that they will no
longer send their children to
that Jewish school.
One important business estab-
lishment• in the riot area, an
appliance store owned by Ben
Koval, has already moved out of
the area. Koval reported that dur-
ing the height of the rioting, 40
television sets were stolen from
his store. He said that, due to
previous thefts and smashing of
windows, insurance has been can-
celed and "I have to absorb the
entire loss myself."
According to the American Jew-
ish World, many stores in the area
now display "for sale" signs, and
owners are planning to move. In
an editorial, the weekly called at-
tention to the fact that, while
everything possible is being done
to aid the residents of the area,
nothing is being done to help the
victimized businessmen, nearly all
of them Jewish.

Einstein Center to Study
Effects of Radiation

PHILADELPHIA (JTA) — Al-
bert Einstein Medical Center here
has received a federal grant of
$132,000 to study the effects of
certain radiations on the skin.
Announcing the grant, Dr. Pas-
cal F. Lucchesi, executive vice-
president and medical director of
the Medical Center, said the funds
will permit expansion of studies
conducted at the center for sev-
eral years by Dr. Joseph Tabach-
nick and Dr. Chang W. Song.
Dr. Tabachnick wilt continue to
direct the project.

The growing differences involve
not only conflicts between Mapai
and Ahdut Avoda, but also argu-
ments within Mapai factions. One
of the main lines of division in-
volves the question of whether the
country should undergo Sapir's
tax and price freeze plan or a
new compulsory loan as the chief
weapon in the fight against the
nation's economic squeeze.
Mapam leaders want not only the
new loan but also a boost in in-
come taxes and a lowering of the
level for special higher taxes on
large income. Mapai willingness to
consider such concessions, how-
ever, evoked growing opposition
from the National Religious Party
and the Independent Liberals.
Leaders of those groups ex-
pressed dissatisfaction both over
such proposed concessions to the
leftist parties and over the prem-
ier's "non-consultation" with them
on the Sapir program.
Basically, the Sapir plan calls
for a freeze on wages and divi-
dends, higher taxes, and incen-
tives to export industries plus
penalties for inefficient produc-
tion. The leftist groups -contend
the plan falls too heavily on the
wage earner.
The National Religious Party
and the Independent Liberals said
that neither the compulsory loan
nor the additional income taxes
should be effected. They called for
cutting costs and greater efficiency
as the basic answer to Israel's
economic troubles.
Sources close to the premier ex-
pressed hope that a plan could be
presented to the cabinet for dis-
cussion before the end of this
month.
New evidence of Israel's eco-
nomic problems emerged from a
report by the Central Bureau of
Statistics that Israel's trade deficit
grew by $8,000,000 during the first
three months of 1966.
The bureau figures showed that
while visible e x p o r t s grew by
$21,000,000 to $150,000,000 in that
period, the government increased
its outlays on services from $25,-
000,000 to $42,000,000.
Israel's f or e i g n currency re-
serves were $697,000,000 on April
1 this year, compared with $752,-
000,000 last year. While the drop
was not a large one, experts said
it was nevertheless serious.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, August 26, 1966-7

Maimonides Institute Building Child's Center

NEW YORK (JTA) — Ground Louis J. Lefkowitz, City Council
was broken last week in Far Rock- President Frank O'Connor and
away, Queens, for the first resi- State Controller Arthur Levitt.
dence hall of the new Maimonides
Institute for Exceptional Chil-
dren. The institute will eventually
For Some
consist of five facilities forming a
nationwide treatment center for
of the
children with learning disabilities
best buys
resulting from mental and emo-
on new
tional disturbances.
Pontiacs
The building will cost $750,000
with part of the expense covered
and
by a grant from the United States
Tempests
Public Health Service.
Ultimately the new center will
ASK
be able to provide services for up
FOR
to 400 handicapped children of all
religions from the metropolitan
area.
Rabbi Isaac Maizes, president of
Maimonides Institute, presided at
AT
the ceremony in which several gov-
ernmental representatives partici-
pated including Congressman
18650 LIVERNOIS
1 block South of 7
Emanuel Celler, Congressman Her-
UN 3-9300
bert Tenzer, Attorney General

SAUL BERGH

Packer Pontiac

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