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July 22, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A Postscript-20 Years After Hiroshima

Twenty years after Hiroshima,
"the Japanese, who know what
nuclear doomsday would look like,
will believe for a long time that
war is the worst possible evil, that
no price is too high to pay for the
pika never to flash again."
In this fashion Rafael Steinberg
sums up his account of the people
of Hiroshima and their city, in
"Postscript From Hiroshima" pub-
lished by Random House.
As a correspondent for many
years in the Orient, Steinberg
writes authoritatively about Japan.
He still lives with his wife and two
daughters in Tokyo. His story is
deeply moving. When the flash
came on that July day 20 years ago
—the pika as the flash is known to
the Japanese—there was spontane-
ous death for 100,000. Then came
the blast and the city was de-
stroyed. "Then came the mush-
room cloud, and the living dead
crying for water, and the rubbery
faces sloughing off like masks, and
the corpses awash in the seven-
fingered delta of the Ota River.
Afterward, came peace."
Such was the beginning of the
tragedy, Steinberg's story is
about the 90,000 who survived
the bomb who are part of pres-

More Public Relations Men
Noted in Jewish Groups

NEW YORK—A sharp increase
in professional public relations
workers in Jewish welfare and
communal services throughout the
United States and Canada was
noted by Henry W. Levy, president
of the American Jewish Public Re-
lations Society.

The growth of professional pub-
lic relations service, especially in
Jewish communities outside New
York, was noted by Levy in con-
nection with publication of a. new
1966 edition of the society's direc-
tory.
He pointed out that the new
issue shows 115 public relations
workers in 83 organizations in the
Jewish communal field, an increase
of more than 80 over the number
in the last edition, published in
1964.
Membership outside New York
City showed the most dramatic
increase, rising more than four-
fold from eight people in six com-
munities in 1964 to 35 in 16 com-
munities this year.

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ent-day rebuilt Hiroshima. Now
it is a busy community. But the
memory is there.
Steinberg's account is about
Japan and its people, about the
"A-Bomb disease," about war and
peace and the people's reactions
and memories.
"Japan's defeat, the first in her
history, laid bare the guts of the
nation," Steinberg writes. "Cower-
ing in shock, the Japanese avidly
tried to soak up everything the vic-
tor murmured. Not all the reforms
of the Occupation could penetrate,
but the idealism of the immediate
postwar period did. Peace, democ-
racy, freedom, neutrality — these

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

8—Friday, July 22, 1966

were the ideals reflected in the 400 Nurses in Tel Aviv Strike for Salary Hike
new constitution drafted in Gen-
(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
mands, the nurses would start a
to The Jewish News)
eral MacArthur's headquarters,
prolonged walkout next Wednesday.
TEL
AVIV

Four
hundred
and even today some Japanese
still daydream of Japan's becom- surgery and delivery room nurses
ing the Switzerland of the Orient." held Wednesday a 24-hour strike
The bomb itself and its effects to press demands for pay increases
on the world, on contending East-
West forces, is part of the discus- they claimed they deserved be-
sion in Steinberg's book. It is a cause of their specialized skills
UNITED BRANDS • DETROIT. UrS.
deeply moving story that is certain and work.
to arouse anew the concern for
A spokesman for the nurses said
peace and the anxieties lest an- they would continue to serve dur-
other A-Bomb may repeat the ing emergency surgery in accord-
The CARIBE MOTEL
tragedy of Hiroshima. "Postscript ance with existing practice on
PROVIDES YOUR
From Hiroshima" is a positive con- Saturdays. The demands total from
OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS
tribution to the discussions in be- 40 to 50 pounds ($13 to $16) more
WITH . .
half of peace.
a month in pay. The spokesman
CONVENIENT LOCATION
said that if the one-day strike
Woodward near 7 Nile Rd.
failed to produce action on the de-
Minutes away from everything

Banning of Funds to Nasser Is Hailed

WASHINGTON (JTA)—The ac-
tion of the House of Representa-
tives in adopting the Farbstein-
Halpern amendment banning aid
to the United Arab Republic was
hailed by Rep. Seymour Halpern,
New York Republican, a co-spon-

sor.

Calling the unanimous vote on
the amendment "the culmination
of years of effort" in Congress to
eliminate United States fofeign aid
to President Nasser of the UAR,
he said "this is the strongest re-
buff to the UAR ever made by the
House."
Referring to Nasser as "The Cas-
tro of the Nile," Rep. Halpern said
that "no one is less entitled to
our assistance" and that no one
"has made more of a mockery of
our program than this tyrant." He
stated that it was "about time"
that Congress took the initiative
by adopting unequivocal language
to stop authorizing aid to the UAR.
He asserted that "in view of
Nasser's continuing transgressions,
I can see no possible justification
for the United States furnishing a
single dime to the UAR. With the
adoption of this amendment, we
serve notice on both Nasser and
the State Department that we no
longer tolerate flagrant abuse of
our funds, nor do we plan to un-
derwrite aggression in the Middle
East."
The amendment to the Foreign
Aid Bill reads: "No assistance
shall be furnished under this act
to the United Arab Republic un-
less the President finds and reports
within 30 days to the Foreign Re-
lations Committee and the appro-
priations committee of the Senate
and the Speaker of the House that
such assistance is essential to the

Dayan Meets U.S. VIPs
Before Vietnam Mission

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
General Moshe Dayan, former
chief of staff of Israel's armed
forces who is now a member of
Israel's parliament from the Rafi
group led by former Premier Da-
vid Ben-Gurion, discussed here
last weekend the Vietnam situation
with top officials of the Pentagon
and the State Department.
He also met with Walter Rostow,
special aide to President Johnson.
Gen. Dayan is collecting material
on the Vietnam war for a series
of articles which he intends to
write after his return from Viet-
nam to Israel.
Gen. Dayan met with General
Maxwell Taylor, special adviser to
the President, former head of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff and U. S.
Ambassador to Saigon. Dayan also
was to meet William Bundy, assist-
ant secretary of state for Far East-
ern affairs, and Raymond Hare,
assistant secretary of state for
South Asia and Near East affairs,
and his deputy Rodger Davies.

national interest of the United
States and that such assistance
will neither directly nor indirectly
assist aggressive actions by the
United Arab Republic."

* *

LUXURIOUS ROOMS

DID YOU...

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

WASHINGTON — Sen. Wayne
Morse, Oregon Democrat, warned
on the Senate floor that United
States military and economic aid
to the Middle East could lead to
United States military interven-
tion there.
Speaking on United States for-
eign aid policy, the senator said
it was necessary "to exercise more
checks against the President, the
secretary of state and the secretary
of defense if they are going to
protect the American people from
that danger."
Sen. Morse cited United States
supplies of arms to Jordan, Saudi
Arabia and Israel. He said that
"Egypt's economic base for a
Soviet-supplied military establish-
ment is strengthened by our mu-
nificent extension of food."
He defined this supply as build-
ing a house of matchsticks which,
"when it collapses," would encour-
age the United States to believe
that military intervention would
be "the only thing that can save
the situation."

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Orthodox Israelis Start
Drive on Post-Mortems

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The ultra-
Orthodox Ag,udat Israel launched
a special campaign Sunday against
post-mortems in Israeli hospitals.
In special prayers in numerous
synagogues, the rabbis called on
all observant Jews to oppose "this
desecration."

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