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July 22, 1966 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22—Friday, July 22, 1966

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Shulman Advocate s Containment
as Concomitant to USSR Peace

Current Far East difficulties,
the puzzles over the unending East-
West struggle, lend added signifi-
cance to a new volume on the Rus-
sion problem by a former De-
troiter, Marshall D. Shulman, who
has gained recognition as an au-
thority on Russia.
In "Beyond the Cold War," pub-
lished by Yale University Press,
Shulman, while emphasizing that
"the conception of containment"
is "a necessary concomitant to the
long-term effort to draw China to-
ward less militant relations with
the rest of the world," declares:

"The effort to strengthen the
Chinese challenge to the Soviet
Union runs the serious risk of
encouraging reckless and mill-
tant actions that may be much
more dangerous than could be
justified by any possible ad-
vantage. Particularly because
our instruments for any such in-
tervention are crude and might
have effects contrary to what
we intend, we ought not attempt
to be unduly clever about trying
to manipulate the parties to this
dispute against each other.
R a t he r we should remem-
ber that we have an interest in
the long-term evolution of both
parties."

Presenting a thorough review of
the Cold War, outlining the ten-

sions that existed following World
War II and during the Korean
crisis, Shulman brings the issue
up to date by asserting that "the
central problem is how to sur-
vive this period of events toward
'the strengthening of international
processes which can accommodate
change without violence." He
states:
"Even in the containment of Chi-
nese power, which now begins to
preoccupy us, the lesson of past
experience with the Soviet Union
would be lost if we did not under-
stand and respond to the sources
of conflict which go far beyond
Communism. Our perspectives must
be broad enough to encompass
the period of violent transitions
into which we are moving, in which

It's a far cry from the Hillel
Day School Concert, or even the
Balfour Concert, but Sherman
Shapiro has gone into the Plum
Street project with the same in-
tense concentration of an entre-
preneur.
Shapiro, who was chairman for
several years of the Zionist Or-
ganization of Detroit's Balfour con-
certs, more recently chaired the
Hillel event. with Jan Peerce as
guest star.

the varied forms of Communism
are understood as complicating
factors entwined among the many
sources of conflict to which our at-
tention must also be directed."
Marshall Shulman, a Harvard
University faculty member, is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry W.
Shulman, of 2641 Woodstock.

Now Shapiro is promoting a
new kind of music to Detroit's
ears; the Plum Street art com-
munity. So impressed was Mayor
Cavanagh with the project's
potential for drawing tourists,
that he has ordered all city de-
partments to give their utmost
cooperation.

LETTER BOX

Transliteration Proposals

Editor, The Jewish News:
May I commend you and the
A.J.P.A. for finally coming up with
a sensible approach to translitera-
ting Hebrew into English. Ob-
viously, under the circumstances,
any decision would have to be
arbitrary and one system is as
good as the other as long as it is
simple and consistent.
I am a little disappointed, how-
ever, in your decision to use the
letter "h" for the Hebrew "hay"
as well as the Hebrew "Khaf" and
"het." As long as you were being
arbitrary you might as well have
gone the whole way and develop-
ed a single symbol to represent
the latter two letters which, for
all practical purposes, are phone-
tically the same. It would make no
difference if it were "ch" or "kh"
or italicized "h" or some other
arbitrary symbol as long as we're
consistent. (I prefer "ch", even
though it has a different sound in
English, because in other foreign
languages it does have a similar
pronunciation to the Hebrew.)
Using the "h" for both Rosh
Hashana and for Hanuka makes it
impossible for the uninitiated to
ever figure out for himself which
to use for less well known
words. Once he learns, for in-
stance, that "ch" is not pronounced
like the English "ch" in check but
rather like the "ch" in German or
Scotch, he will always be able to
pronounce any new words he may
come across.
IRWIN SHAW,
Executive Director
Jewish Community Center

...11111•11=101• ■ ••• ■ ••1111011OMMIN,

Try and Stop Me

By BENNETT CERF

author of "Growing Up Absurb" (a
AUL
P
formidable best-seller on college campuses), tells stu-
dents who are hard pressed financially that "anybody who

GOODMAN,

really wants art educa-
tion can always get one.
Just go in and sit down!"
When Mr. Goodman was
himself an impoverished
student, he bicycled up to
Columbia and brazenly
took a seat in Professor
Dick McKeon's philoso-
phy class. McKeon not
only took it for granted
he was a registered stu-
dent, but soon was pub-
lishing pieces by him in
the Journal of Philoso- 7-26
phy. Good man, McKeon!
Goodman quotes the popular professor, Morris Cohen,
who usually lectured to classes swollen to three times the
number officially paid up and registered, "What do the
authorities expect me to do about it? I'm not a constable!"

*

Charns-Illa nheim Vows Plum Street Project Really Big Show
Are Exchanged Here to Local Promoter Sherman Shapiro

*

John Fuller inquiries if you've heard (1) of the gangster who
stood by at a gangland funeral and sighed, "They shouldn't put
all their yeggs in one casket"; (2) the baseball hurler with a sore
arm who's•in the throws of agony; and (3) the TV commercial
spieler who bought himself a new sincere-sucker suit? Well, now
you have!
*
4,*

RIDDLE-DE-DEE!:
Q. Why did the little boy take his cow to church?

A. He heard there was a new pastor.
Q. What kind of shoes are made from banana skim?
A. Slippers.
Q. What's the best way to drive a baby buggy?
A. Tickle its feet.
Q. What did the doctor say to the lady belly dancer?
A. "You have a strip-de-carcass infection."

0 1966, by Bennett Cent, Distributed by King Features Syndicate

MRS. NORMAN CHARNS

Barbara Ann Manheim, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Man-
helm of Stoepel Ave., became the
bride of Norman Charns, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Charns of
Hubbell Ave., in a recent cere-
mony at the Sheraton-Cadillac
Hotel. Dr. Richard C. Hertz offi-
ciated.
The bride wore a short,' princess-
style gown of Alencon lace. A
matching bow held her short veil.
Matron of honor was Mrs.
Fred Wahle of Oakland, Calif.,
sister of the bride. Phillip Charns,
brother of the bridegroom, was
best man.
Following a Florida and Nassau
honeymoon, the couple will live in
Royal Oak.

67 Chagall Works
Donated to Museum

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

and Cobb will be willing to guide
persons who wish to open shops
in the area, anyone is welcome
to lease area buildings on their
own.

Shapiro said recent publicity
brought thousands of persons out
to see the shops that have already
opened and that 30 shopkeepers
are expected by the September
opening.

8ng agernents

The community is located in an

eight block square area bounded

-

by Vernor, the Lodge Expressway,
Michigan and Third. Already Sha-
piro and his partner, Robert Cobb,
have 19 lessees in the area,
among them an art gallery, music
shop, book store, newspaper office,
dress shop and gourmet foods store.
By Sept. 1, when the official
opening will take place, there
should be a coffee shop and cafe,
as well as other attractions.
Shapiro envisions, for example,
an outdoor Parisian-style cafe and
an area set off in nearby Elton
Park for outdoor dances, concerts
and a free-speech forum.
The mayor ordered trees and
hanging flowers to be placed
around Plum Street and gave other
directions to the Department of
Public Works and the lighting,
commission to give special atten-
tion to the area in order to make
it the "showplace of the city."

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Schwartz
of Rutherford Ave. announce the
engagement of their daughter Janet
Carolyn to Paul R. Abramson, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Abramson
of St. Louis. Miss Schwartz is a
graduate of Wayne State Univer-
sity and attends the University of
California. Mr. Abramson is a
graduate of Washington University
of St. Louis, and is completing his
PhD at the University of Califor-
nia. A Sept. 11 wedding is planned.

Music the Stein-Way

DICK STEIN
& ORCHESTRA

U 7-2770'

PHOTOGRAPHY by

BERNARD H.

WINER

. . _. . . . . . . . . . . . „_.. . . . . . . . . . . ._. . . _. . .,

KE 1-8196

PARIS—Marc Chagall transmit-
Bar Mitzvahs — Weddings
Shapiro stressed that while he
ted to the French Republic Mon-
day 67 of his works which are
part of a series known as the
"Biblical Message," on which the
Truly the finest Music and
Russian-born Jewish artist has been
working for the last 15 years.
Eentertainment for the discriminating
The 67 works will be displayed in
a museum to be built at Nice on
the Riviera to
the artist's spe-
cifications. T h e
Lincoln 5-8614
works include
17 oils and 50 .•=1.1M110,0411 ■111111
11■ 1■0■
Gouaches, aqua-
relies and draw-
ings on Biblical
themes. Two
"Buy With Confidence"
famous master-
pieces in the
Chagall
group are "Moses
and the Tables of the Law" and
Gemologists
Diamontolog ists
"The Creation of Man."
17540 WYOMING
DI 1.1330
Many of the 67 works have never
been on display.
The 79-year-old painter signed
OPEN THURS., FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M.
over title to the works at a cere-
mony in Nice which was attended
by a representative of Andre Mal-
raux, minister of culture.
Chagall will be the consultant
for the Chagall Museum, which
will be built at Cimiez in a huge *
WE WILL BE CLOSED JULY 31 to AUGUST 8
park which is part of Nice. A Ma-
i
tisse museum already has been
K OSHER KILLED,
opened at the site. The Chagall
or more
Museum will not be completed be-
Lb.
fore 1969. By then the artist plans
to donate more of his works.
Lb.

r

1

macA 1Ptt and El is Orchestra

•1. 4!E.MIWOMN1. 141•11. 11.•10•41

1

01•10.0.1MOININDAMIYOMINMI1111111.14111

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The Herman IVluehlstein Foun-
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