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July 22, 1966 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

`Saturday the Rabbi Went liungry:Kemelman s Splendid New Mystery

There are not many mystery
stories with wholesome Jewish
themes, yet, an excellent precedent
was set by Harry Kemelman with
his "Friday the Rabbi Slept Late"
which deserved the sensation it
Created.
Now Kemelman has pursued his
theme and in his newest work,
"Saturday the Rabbi Went Hun-
gry," published by Crown (419
Park S. ; NY16), Kemelman has
written an addendum to the Rabbi
David Small story that will delight
the readers, will keep them glued
to it from beginning to end and
will ,once again, prove the author's
knowledge of Jewish traditions; his
understanding of communal differ-
ences of opinions, his positive way
of approaching a matter in which
the honor of a Jewish community
might be involved.
Primarily it is a story about a
young rabbi who adheres to his
principles and his faith. He is a
Conservative and he makes con-
cessions, but not on - basic Jewish
issues. And he has a sense of ob-
servation, a way of diagnosing
puzzling situations, a sort of
sleuth's skill.
* *
Involved in this story, the plot

of which commences on the eve
of Yom Kippur, is a synagogue
president's desire to enlarge upon
the temple unnecessarily from the
rabbi's point of view, the spiritual
leader's rejection of the idea, the
conflict it creates and the way in
which it was sojved.
In the meantime, a Jew who was
non-observant was found dead in
his car in his garage. He was
asphyxiated. But he also was an
alcoholic and the first ruling was
that it was accidental death—re-
sulting from drinking. He had not
gone to the Kol Nidre service, yet
his non-Jewish wife wanted a Jew-
ish burial for him, and after the
funeral service there was an added
scandal: objection to burying a sui-
cide according to Jewish law.
Rabbi Small defended his action
of officiating at the funeral and
in the course of the discussions
suggested that it was not suicide
but murder. That's when matters-
became more and more compli-
cated and several members of the
congregation were held under sus-
picion, since a double indemnity
policy had just been written the
widow also was suspected and even
a Christian minister who befriend-

Communications Cable Pact
Signed by Israel and France

JERUSALEM (JTA)—Israel and
France signed an agreement pro-
viding for the construction of a
2,125-mile underwater cable be-
tween Tel Aviv and Marseilles
that will enable the first cable
telecommunications between Israel
and the United States and Europe
to begin operating in 1968. Current
telephone and other communica-
tions links between Israel and
points in Europe and the United
States are by radio. The $17,-
000,000 Mediterranean cable will
join Israel with the extensive
cable network now linking Europe
with the United States.
The Israeli and French govern-
ments have formed a joint com-
pany to operate the cable with
Israel holding 60 percent of the
shares and France 40 percent.
The company is expected to sell
individual circuits of the 96-
circuit cable to various govern-
ments and telecommunic a ti 0 n s
companies.
During the ceremonies at which
the agreement was signed, Yes-
hayahu Lavie, director general of
the Israel Ministry of Posts,
handed over a check of 5,000,000
pounds ($1,667,000) to repre-
sentatives of Excofina, the French
telecommunications company that
was awarded the contract for

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producing and laying the cable.
Fr e n c h ambassador to Israel
Bertrand de la Sabliere . stated at
the ceremony that the cable will
be another link uniting the two
countries.

` Cemetery

ed the beautiful widow was sus-
pected.
t * *
Clever Rabbi Small resorted to
pilpul in discussing the matter
with his friend, the chief of police.
He figured out that the murder
was committed by a non-Jewish
associate in the laboratory he
worked in because of errors the
Jew had discovered in the sus-
pect's work.
In the course of the difficulties
that had arisen, the rabbi resign-
ed, but his letter offering to quit
was never read to the board. He
became a hero. The president had
hoped to get a large sum from a
rich member for an addition to the
temple to which the rabbi objected,
and the rabbi, who had saved that
wealthy man's son from embar-
rassment while being suspected of
the murder, gave the big gift to
the rabbi—for a chapel on the
cemetery.
The remarkable factors in this
mystery novel are the rabbi's pil-
pulistic discussions, the review of
Jewish attitudes on alcoholism,
suicide, intermarriage, burial cus-
toms, martyrdom.

good relations with the Christian
neighbors in that small community
of Barbard's Crossing.
From a score of points of view,
Kemelman has produced a charm-
ing novel, replete with humor, fill-
ed with good sense. The well writ-
ten "Saturday the Rabbi Went
Hungry"—a title applicable only
to the fact that the tale began on
Yom Kippur—will delight the
readers and will gain new stature
for the novelist.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Since UNICEF, the Nobel Peace
Prize-winning organization was es-
tablished in 1946, over 40,000,000
persons, half of them mothers and
children, have been cured of yaws,
a crippling tropical disease. The
cure—a single shot of penicillin.
Its cost— 2 cents for a child, 5
cents for an adult.

Israel Citrus Exports
Israel citrus exports for the
1965-66 season totaled 15,100,000
crates, representing a 12 per cent
increase over the figure for the
previous season.

Friday, July 22, 1966-17

-4(

!;, MARKOWITZ

4

*

President of The United Stales -4(

* VOLUNTEERS NEEDED — CALL LARRY HARWIN, KE 2-8880

Pol. Adv.

Ix

There is that timely discussion
on the "edifice complex" to which
the rabbi objected. Truly fasci-
nating are the rabbi's comments
on Jewish names—in the course of
his plans for the naming of his ex-
pected child—his wife was in
pregnancy in the midst of this tur-
bulent period in their life!
And there is, as in the earlier
novel, an indication of how well
the rabbi was able to establish

576

iX 576

576
Ilifatch for JOHN D.

lx

O'COIIIIELL 15 - 1

576

576

Pol. Adv.

Judaism'

By DR. SAMUEL SILVER

(A Seven Arts Feature)

In a moving statement by an Or-
thodox rabbi of Brooklyn, Rabbi
Howard Kahn, I read for the first
time the term, "Cemetery Juda-
ism."
Rabbi Kahn says that on Sun-
days the roads to the interment
places of Greater New York are
clogged with cars carrying those
who want to spend some time near
the graves of their departed dear.
Rabbi Kahn lauds the sentiments
of those who feel that such visits
are helpful. As one person said to
him, "I feel better after going to
Momma's grave, crying a little and
talking my heart out." Comments
the rabbi: "This therapy is cheaper
than an psychiatrist who charges
for listening."
- But Rabbi Kahn feels that
mourning could be made more pur-
poseful if people understood better
the Jewish concept of death. "What
we bury is dead," he explains, "but
what Nye call a soul lives eternally
and is not located underground,
and the best thing to do for a loved
one is to do something for that part
of him that still lives."
Muses Rabbi Kahn: "If the mon-
ey spent for gasoline and tolls on
cemetery visits would be spent for
synagogues andyeshivot, or even
for good books' on Judaism, how
much more alive the current Jew-
ish scene would be !"
Adds he: "The next time you
get into your car for a visit to the
cemetery, ask yourself, when was
the last time you visited a syna-
gogue, when was the last time you
road a book on a Jewish theme or
discussed religion with your chil-
dren?"
The statement concludes' with
this touching thought: "My father's
grave is in Israel. I've never been
there. But when I open one of the
Hebrew books he bequeathed me,
when I reread some of his letters,
when I get up to give a sermon
and behold his face before me,
when I conduct a Seder the way he
used to, I feel his presence. I sense
his living soul. And it matters not
that his grave lies beyond my phys-
ical reach.'
Rabbi Kahn has given its a
meaningful Guide to Mourning !

A tree is cut down by an axe
which is joined to a piece of the
tree itself.—Eliyahu Rabbah, 29.

You know this man

by his long friendship
by the good things he does

HELP ELECT

G. MENNEN

ILLIAMS

DEMOCRAT/FOR U.S. SENATOR

You can trust him

BE SURE YOU VOTE AUGUST 2 FOR WILLIAMS

U.S. SonalarCsnwiltfte

EDDIE McGLOIN, Chairman

VOTE FULL TERM/VOTE SHORT TERM

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