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June 17, 1966 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-06-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

American ewisli Leaders of Fifty Years Ago

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, June 17, 1966-5

Conservative Jews
in Israel Form Union

JERUSALEM ( JTA ) —The three
Conservative congregations in Is-
rael announced they had organized
themselves into a United Syna-
gogue of Israel. The new organiza-
tion will be affiliated with, but will
not receive direct financial support
from, the United Synagogue of
America, the association of Ameri-
can Conservative congregations.

Hitler Birthplace
Reverts to Beerhall

PARIS — The house where Adolf
Hitler was born is to be turned into
a beerhall, according to the Paris
edition of the New York Herald
Tribune.
Located on Salzburger Vorstadt
15, in Braunau, Austria, the house
bears no plaque or mention in
tourist folders, but as one local
resident Pointed out, "everyone
knows where it is."
The only Hitler memento left in
the building is a scale model of old
Braunau made by a local crafts-
man and handed to the fuehrer in
1938. It was sent back to Braunau
soon after, some say because the
leader of the Reich didn't like to
be reminded that he was born in
the upper story of a popular beer-
hall.

These famous American Jewish leaders of half a century ago were the founders of the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board and members of JWB's executive committee during World War I and founders and
leaders of other national Jewish organizations of that day. This photo is one of the many interesting
illustrations in the newly-published "Change and Challenge: A History of 50 Years of JWB" by Oscar I.
Janowsky, Louis Kraft and Bernard Postal. Left to right: seated, Rabbi Maurice H. Harris, Louis Marshall,
Colonel Harry Cutler, Dr. Cyrus Adler, Gustave Hartman; standing, Charles J. Teller, Dr. David de Sola
Pool, Mortimer J. Schiff, Israel Unterberg, Henry J. Bernheim and Joseph Rosenzweig.

Agency- U.1A Merger Broadens Base

)

(Continued from Page 1)
"In effecting the consolidation
of these two organizations, we are
not merely concerned with the
desire to achieve a greater degree
of operating efficiency," Stone
said. "Our concern is not only
with budgeting and administration
of programs, but with human lives.
The more than 1,250,000 Jews we
helped bring to Israel during the
past 18 years represent a unique
testimony to Jewish survival and
Jewish self-help; yet the job is far
from complete. There are still
hundreds and thousands of Jews
the world over who require reset-
tlement and this, too, is our re-
sponsibility."

Stone noted that the merging

of the two organizations will "en-

able us to give recognition to the
deep concern of the American Jew-
ish contributor for the continued
adequate and effective functioning
of these vital philanthropic pro-
grams, and offer full scope for the
) participation and involvement of
all sectors of American Jewry
throughout the country." He
pointed out that, as long as any
Jew in need the world over has a
right to come to Israel and be as-
sisted in the process of resettle-
ment and rehabilitation "simply
because he is a Jew," every
:Ierican Jew ought to consider
Ais moral responsibility to con-
,, ,..tbute to the cost of receiving
and resettling these refugees be-
cause he, too, is a Jew.
i
Gottlieb Hammer, executive vice
president of the United Israel Ap-
peal, Inc., reviewing the achieve-
ments of the two organizations in-
/ volved in the merger over the past
six years, reported that, during
this period, a total of 275,800 per-
sons had been aided through a
1 wide variety of resettlement and
rehabilitation services involving a
total American contribution of
$190,800,000.
Among the major items included
in this total, Hammer listed: $54,-
774,000 for transportation and re-
lated activities; $37,194,000 for re-
ception and initial, absorption;
$44,113,000 for resettlement in agri-
Cultural communities; $29,916,000
) for immigrant housing; $9,000,000
for youth care and training; $8,-
839,000 for higher education and
related educational and cultural
activities; while the balance was
'
spent on administrative services.
Hammer noted that, despite the
1 extensive and effective network of
Services financed with these heavy
expenditures, the rehabilitation of
many of the new arrivals was still
far from complete. "The problem
of the 'two Israels'," Hammer de-
clared, "the need for educational

facilities; the need for added facil-
ities for the care of the aged and
the sick—these are some of the
deficits in our activities which can
no longer be swept under the rug."
Dr. Emanuel Neumann, member
of the Jewish Agency executive
and honorary chairman of the
Zionist Organization of America,
reviewed the history of the United
Israel Appeal from its inception
in 1925. He noted that the UIA
had served not only to unify Zion-
ist fund-raising efforts and subse-
quently to pave the way for in-
creasing participation of non-Zion-
ist elements in its leadership, but
that in joining with the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Commit-
tee, in establishing the United
Jewish Appeal it had become a
partner in setting up "the most
comprehensive a n d constructive
agency in American Jewish life."
Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman,
executive vice chairman of the
UJA, expressed confidence that
the new organization will help
strengthen the work of the UJA
in Jewish communities throughout
the country. He reported that the
UJA campaign was steadily mov-
ing upward. Receipts in 1965 were
$3,000,000 ahead over 1964, and
there were good chances for a
substantial further increase in
1966, he said.
Irving Kane, chairman of the
overseas service committee of the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds, expressed his
deep gratification with the merger
which had been worked out by
the two organizations in close co-
operation with the council.

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Economist Dr. Lubin
Honored on 70th Year

Custom Alterations

NEW YORK (JTA)—Leaders of
all walks in Jewish life, as well
as non-Jewish personalities, hon-
ored Dr. Isador Lubin, noted Amer-
ican economist and representative
of the Jewish Agency, Inc. in Is-
rael, on the occasion of his 70th
birthday.

At a luncheon tendered in his
honor at the Cosmopolitan Club
here, June 9, Dewey Stone, who
presided, out-
lined the services
of Dr. Lubin to
Jewish causes.
Edward M. War-
burg spoke of Dr.
Lubin's contribu-
tions to the work
of the Joint Dis-
tribution Commit-
tee.
Other speakers
included Dr.
Abraham Sachar,
president of the
Brandeis Univer-
sity; Jacob Potof-
sky, president of Dr. Lubin
the Amalgamated Clothing Work-
ers Union of America; and Maurice
Boukstein, counselor of the Jew-
ish Agency. Gottlieb Hammer, ex-
ecutive vice-president of the Jew-
ish Agency, Inc., read a number
of messages of greetings to Dr.
Lubin received at the luncheon.
Dr. Sachar announced that in
honor of Dr. Lubin, a graduate fel-
lowship fund has been established
at the Brandeis University which
will subsidize gifted students. The
fund will carry Dr. Lubin's name.

SORRY

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