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June 10, 1966 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-06-10

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THE JEWISH NEWS

. prEKNATIONAL TRIBUTE TO StioLEM ALEICHEM
ow -iwE soift ANNivEleAky Of HIS 0641016.14

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle commencing with issue of July 20, 1951

Member American Association of English—Jewish Newspapers, Michigan Press Association, National Editorial
Association.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17100 West Seven Mile Road, Detroit, Mich. 48235.
YEA-9364. Subscription $6 a year. Foreign $7.
Second Class Postage Paid at Detroit, Michigan

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor and Publisher

CARM1 M. SLOMOVITZ

Business Manager

SIDNEY SHMARAK



CHARLOTTE HYAMS

City Editor

Advertising Manager

Sabbath Scriptural Selections
This Sabbath, the 23rd day of Sivan, 5726, the following scriptural selections will
be read in our synagogues:
Pentateuchal portion: Num. 13:1-15:41; Prophetical portio)n: Joshua 2:1-24.

Licht Benshen, Friday. June 10, 7:48 p. m.

June 10, 1966

Page 4

VOL. XLIX. No. 16

ORT's Vocational Training: Positive Limelights

During the 85 years of ORT activities,
commencing with the vocational training that
was provided for Jewish youth in Russia,
world Jewry has recognized the urgency of
training young people for productive pur-
suits. The scene naturally shifted from Rus-
sia to many lands, primarily to areas where
displaced persons found refuge after the last
war and in Moslem countries. In the past 20
years, according to the latest ORT report,
the enrolled number of students in ORT
schools has doubled and it is expected that
their number will rise to 50,000 this year.
A revealing chart has been issued to
describe ORT's current status. According to
the figures just released, the scene has
shifted again and the limelight now is on
Israel where ORT now _conducts half of its
entire global program. This chart is most
illuminating:

COUNTRY*

ARGENTINA
AUSTRIA
BELGIUM
BRAZIL
FRANCE
HOLLAND
INDIA
IRAN
ISRAEL
ITALY
MOROCCO
POLAND
SOUTH AFRICA
TUNISIA
URUGUAY
U.S .A.
SWITZERLAND
Central Instittite
TOTAL

Enroll-
ment

Teaching Training
Units
Staff

12
27
7
4
6
1
7
4
86
192
7
4
9
9
25
70
228
952
67
60
31
61
72 120
1
1
19
33
5
6
4
3
6
30

525
265
334
153
5,293
200
341
2,294
24,924
4,127
2,275
2,786
320
1,182
243
733
197

46,192

1.536

633

*Does not include Greece, Guinea and Mali
**In-Plant Training

Israel's needs and the growing responsi-
bilities in France; the continuing services in
Morocco, Poland and in Iran—in addition to
the schooling provided in several European
countries, in the Latin Americas and to a
degree in this country—all point to an im-
pressive program that calls for constant
implementation.
The situation in France is especially
grave. It has been reported that 90 per cent
of the Jewish children are not receiving a
Jewish education in France. Perhaps the
ORT program will inspire a change in exist-
ing conditions. Meanwhile ORT reports in
relation to the French situation:

There. are an estimated 300,000 Jews in
Paris, and more of them are in the Casbah than
anywhere else. The Casbah is something new
in Paris, a, slum teeming with Jews from
Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, even Egypt.
They are likely to remain—packed six to
a room, stifling in the summer, shivering in
the winter—until they find jobs and earn liveli-
hoods that will free them to move to better
quarters. Charles Jordan, executive vice-chair-
man of the Joint Distribution ,Committee, which
is aiding 52,000 of these refugees this year,
defines the problem as "the difficulty in getting
jobs, which pay enough to support their fami-
lies, for people who do not possess the skills
that are currently needed in France."
The facts are as simple as they are stark.
Not too many years ago, there were about
300,000 Jews in France. The latest estimate is
520,000. A recent study shows that 100,000
came from North Africa between 1956 and
1961. Another 110,000 arrived in the spring of
1962, in the wake of the Algerian revolution.
The influx has slowed down since, but "they still
keep coming from Tunisia, and now increas-
ingly from Morocco," Jordan reports. No
community could be expected to cope on its
own with a problem of such magnitude.
The French authorities have been generous
ment as fast as possible. Apprenticeship serv-
ices were enlarged and extended to each of the
five cities with ORT programs, so that young
adults and others just beyond school age could
get on the employment ladder. Last year alone,

to the newcomers from Algeria, but time has
run out on most of this aid and there are still
tens of thousands who have yet to make a place
for themselves. Tunisians are in a still different
category. Unlike the Algerians, they are not,
in the main, French citizens, and therefore not
eligible for the same kind of help.
The French economy is prosperous and
there are jobs for all who qualify. The rub is
that few among this mass of over 200,000 new-
comers 'have the necessary skills. They were
middlemen, clerks, shopkeepers, hairdressers,
druggists, artisans in purely local crafts—and
of these, France has more than enough.
The sheer numbers involved have over-
whelmed the efforts of French ORT to supply
the training that can lead the immigrants to
better prospects. Nevertheless, in a kind of
forced march, much has been done.
Dozens of classes were rushed into opera-
tion for adults, so that the family breadwinner
could find his economic feet in his new environ-

STUDENTS IN VARIOUS TYPES OF TRAINING

Voca-
tional
Schools

55

Training
Work
Shops

396
214

20

1,921

153
876
62
34
76
412
145

Voca-
tional
Courses

36
51

Chil-
dren's
Manual
Training

Appren-
tice and
Pre Appr.
Plans

38

314

1,259

1,237

138
205
1,284

AmIDOM

Feuchtwanger's 'Righteous Lives'
Describes 42 Men of Learning

0. Feuchtwanger goes back to a scholar of the 11th Century
in gathering the collected wisdom of 42 distinguished men of learning
he describes, in his "Righteous Lives," published . by Bloch.
He begins with Rabbenu Joseph ha-Levi ibn Migash (1077-1141)
in a series dealing with Natural Leaders and continues with a group
listed under New Vessels for Old Wine. The other section titles in the
book are: Basic Commentators, Creative and Original Thinkers,
Masters of Applied Halaha, The Lithuanian School of Talmudic
Thinking, Lovers and Builders of Zion and Tzadikkim of Stature.

The essays are brief — the entire volume including a
comprehensive index contains 170 pages—and their very concise-
ness makes_ this work stand out with its offering of valuable
6,983
information about great men of learning.
798
The concluding section dealing with tzadikkim describes the
595
507
saintly innovator Rabbi Gershon Chanoch Lainer, 1839-1890; Rabbi
805
927
493** Yehudah Leib Iter, the "Sefath Emeth," 1847-1905; the Ostrovtzer
Rebbe, Rabbi Yechiel Meir ha-Levi Halstuch, 1852-1928; the Last
300
441
223
Radomsker Rebbe, Rabbi Shlomoh Chanoch ha-Cohen Rabinovitz,
402
1828-1942.
168
• Because the last named is the closest to our time, it is worth
733
105
noting that he belonged to an aristocratic Hasidic dynasty, that he
92
refused to leave the Warsaw Ghetto during the war, continuing his
spiritual labors there; that he preferred to remain with his community
19,425
4,297
8,249
4,299
9,922
and perished with them.
Among the earliest dealt with in addition to Ibn Migash were
the Ba'al ha-Turim Rabbenu Ya'akov, 1270-1343, and his brother
over 1,200 persons were placed in this manner. Rabbenu Yehudah who died in 1349; Don Yitzhak Abrabanel, 1437-
Then there is the situation in Israel. The 1508; the Maharal of Prague, Rabbi Yehuda ben Betzalel, 1512 or
1520-1609: Rabbi Moshe Isserles, the Rema, 1520 or 1530-1572; and
ORT report shows that, in spite of the lower- other
well known scholars.
ing of the rate of unemployment in Israel,
Eminent among those listed are Rabbi Moshe Chayim Luzatto,
there is an estimated 40,000 of the country's
1707-1747; Rabbi Zelmele Volozhiner, 1756-1788; Rabbi Yitzhak
youths who are neither in school nor at work.
Elchanan Spector, 1817-1897; Rabbi Tzvi Hirsh Kalisher, 1795.
ORT's objective is that "there shall be no
1874; Rabbi Shmuel Mohilever, 1824-1898; Rabbi Shmuel Salant,
child in Israel who need fear his future will
1816-1909; Rabbi Abraham Yitzhak ha-Cohen Kook, 1865-1935.
come to an end with the end of his primary
Other important figures are part of this anthological work on
education because there is no place for him." rabbinic scholars. The author has explored an important area in.
With the aid of the Israel government, ORT gathering information about the great Orthodox scholars, and - hi,'
is advancing a program of training and reha- "Righteous Lives" forms an excellent who's:who of religious notable.'

68
869
14,566
393
987

34
65
2.963
2,791
186
561
20
116
75

bilitation that is among the great assets to
the new nation.
As Dr. William Haber, president of ORT,
stated in his introduction to the organiza-
tion's report, "ORT's perspectives are being
structured" by needs and demands that call
for amelioration of "misery, deprivation and
displacement." ORT steps in to provide a
large measure of relief in these spheres and
the movement remains among the most
positive in Jewish life.

Ford in Israel

Establishment of a Ford plant in Israel
rates more than a mere business item in the
world press. It means the introduction of
large-scale manufacturing in Israel. It is a
gesture not only of good will, but of assur-
ance to a struggling new nation that antag-
onism to it from hostile neighbors will not
be tolerated. Also: a Ford plant in Israel
means a new era for a great institution in
Detroit whence, at one time, stemmed doubts
and suspicions and where there now is a gen-
uine desire for good will among all faiths
and all peoples regardless of race, creed or
color. The new movement in Israel's direc-
tion is a tribute to the younger elements in
the family who now direct policy and set
examples that are marked by very good aims.

Martin Buber's 'Hasidism'

• "The Origin and Meaning of Hasidism" by Martin Buber, first
printed in 1960 by Horizon Press, has just been reissued as a paper-
back by Harper and Row.
Edited and translated by Prof. Maurice Friedman, this important
definitive work explains the basis for Hasidic folklore, interprets the
ideals of Hasidism, the views on God and the soul, on redemption as
well as spirit and the body.
Buber's students and those seeking knowledge about the Hasidic
movement will be especially rewarded by the treatment in this book
of Hasidism's place in the history of religion, by the chapters on
"Christ, Hasidism, Gnosis" and "Spinoza, Sabbatai Zvi and the
Baal-Shem."
In the latter, there is this admonition: "The Hasidic message of
self-redemption stands in opposition to the Messianic self-differenti-
ation of one man from other men, of one time from other times, of
one act from other actions. All mankind is accorded the co-working
power, all time is directly redemotive, all action for the sake of God
may be Messianic action."
Because of the link of mysticism with Hasidism, it is important
to note, in the chapter on the history of religion, that Buber stated::
"Of all the manifestations of the history of religion, Hasidism is
that one in which two lines meet in full clarity, lines which it is
usually assumed cannot meet by their very nature: the line of inner
illumination and the line of revelation, that of the moment beyond
time and that of historical time. Hasidism explodes the familiar view
of mysticism. Faith and mysticism are not two worlds, although the
tendency to become two independent worlds ever again wins the up-
per hand in them. Mysticism is the sphere on the borderland of faith,
the sphere in which the soul draws breath between word and word."
• Denying that he had written "to the disadvantage of Christianity,"
Buber asserted that he viewed Jesus "as my great brother."

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