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The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 03, 1966 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
22 Friday, June 3, 1966



Elissa Joyce Zolkower
Weds Alan Grossman

MRS. ALAN GROSSMAN

Elisssa Joyce Zolkower, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Zol-
kower, 18044 Warrington, became
the bride of Alan Joseph Grossman
Jr., at a noon wedding, al
ong. Shaarey Zedek. Mr. Gross- C
man is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Alan Joseph Grossman of 18045
Fairfield.
The bride wore a gown of silk
organza over taffeta. It had an
Open neckline, cap sleeves, and
Stitched Empire bodice with deep
ruffles of appliqued Alencon lace
which fell into a graceful floor-
length gown. Her veil was chapel
length, and was held in place by
a cap of matching lace.
Thomas J. Grossman, brother of
the bridegroom served as best
man, and ushers were as follows:
Alan Serwer, Samuel Scheinfield,
Neil Satovsky, Steven Grossman,
and Mark Stern.
The maid of honor was Susan
Zolkower, sister of the bride. The
bridesmaids were Gail Disner,
Mary Grossman, sister of the
bridegroom, and Mrs. Thomas J.

Congregation Beth Isaac of Trenton Issues Unique 'So? What's Cooking?'

With the waves of European
immigration to the United States
during the latter part of the
Nineteenth Century and the early
Twentieth, simple New World
cuisine became enriched by the
culinary contributions of older,
more sophisticated cultures. Thus,
spaghetti and pizza, vichysoisse
and onion soup, keilbasa and
stuffed cabbage, tacos and tamales,
chow mein and sukiyaki, borscht
and bagels all have added to the
colorful 'variety of American
menus.
The delights of Jewish cooking
(and the almost legendary talents
of Jewish cooks) have become as
much a part of the American scene
as baseball and apple pie.
In the Downriver area, where
the Jewish population is relatively
sparse, a group of enthusiastic
women has banded together in a
project calculated to introduce
many traditional—and delicious—
Jewish dishes to their friends and
neighbors. Members of Congrega-
tion Beth Isaac, Trenton, have
compiled, edited and illustrated
an anthology of their own recipes.
The fruit of their two-year-long
effort, entitled "So? What's Cook-
ing?" is more than merely a
cookbook, however. It contains a
description of each of the major
Jewish festivals, explaining cus-
toms and ceremonies, and includes
suggestions for appropriate dishes
to be served during each such
occasion.

Mrs. Priver Heads
Recruitment for UF

Mrs. Julien Priver has been
named recruitment chairman of
the Central Wayne County unit for
the 1966 Torch Drive.
Mrs. Priver served as Central
Wayne Torch Drive chairman in
1965. In her new post, her respon-
sibilities will include promoting
the enrollment of women volun-
teers among the many agencies
supported by the UF. They will
Grossman.
include recruits from both staff
Upon their return from Canada, and volunteer groups.
the couple will reside in Royal
The 1966 drive, which will again
Oak.
seek operating funds for nearly
200 health and community serv-
ices, will be held Oct. 18 - Nov. 10.
Mrs. Priver is a board member
the Visiting Nurse Association
When it Comes of
and the Women's Division of the
Jewish Welfare Federation and a
To Noodles .. .
member of Sinai Hospital Women's
Guild and Women in Community
Service.
Her husband, Dr. Priver, is
administrator of Mount Sinai
Hospital.

Greenfield's

Tops
Them
All

Radomer to Celebrate
Israel's Anniversary

Radomer Aid and Ladies Society
will celebrate the 18th anniversary
of Israel's statehood 8 p.m. Tues-
day at Workmen's Circle Center.
Sol Ager, president, is chair-
man for the evening. Entertain-
ment and refreshments will be
featured.

BRAVERMAN

'S KNOESAHTESR

ALL SPECIALS GOOD WHILE QUANTITIES LAST

,SPIINIDAY ON LY

YOUNG BEEF LIVER ....
PICKLED TONGUE

RIB LAMB CHOPS
CORNED BEEF
CHUCK ROAST
BRUST DEKEL
BREAST OF BEEF Trimmed

13500 WEST SEVEN MILE ROAD



$11"

lb.

Lb '

95c
69`

89e

DI 1-2345

SAM EMMER

ALBUM
FINER

WINER

.0
'

JAN GILBERT

and His ORCHESTRA

Call UN. 1-3065

SHER PARTY TRAYS

Bagels appear in two versions 1•
in "So? What's Cooking?" One, : • Roasted Whole Chicken or Turkey with Stuffing,




:

prepared without leaven, is de- •
• Cheese Blintzes ••
Potatoes and Gravy
signed to be eaten during Pass- e

Fresh
Knishes Daily :
:

Tasty
Delicious
Kishka
over, when leaven of any kind is
• Chopped Herring
• Dill Pickles :
forbidden. The lineage of this : • Chopped Liver

highly esteemed food is traced : — •-
WE DELIVER IN SOUTHFIELD!

to the Russian "bablitcki." •

"Bagel," a footnote states, "conies'
Call
l 9
from the German word Buegel,
UN - 645 :
DELIVER
R
for stirrups," although the shape

was eventually changed from a

e
18252 WYOMING near CURTIS

horseshoe to a ring. The name :
EN
SATURDAY
NIGHT
SUNDOWN
TO
1
A.M.
OPEN
was Judaized because of its popu- •
•S
larity among Austrian and Polish U.s••••••••••••••.••••.••moem•m••im•mee
Jews who brought it to the
•••• ■ •••••• ■ •••••••••••m•oseee..••mom••m•.,
United States.


"So? What's Cooking?" was
AMERICA'S No. I
conceived about two years ago
100% PURE
by Mrs. Richard Kane, of Tren-
BEEF PRODUCTS
ton, and Mrs. Daniel Kaufman, •

of Grosse Ile.

Although she teaches fifth grade
at Owen School in Trenton, Mrs.
Kane found time to devote un- •
• . . only the finest in quality
counted hours to researching the • . and
taste from Kosher Zion . . .
copious historical notes. Recipes • made fresh daily in our new,
were collected from members of
modern, clean, stainless steel
the congregation—who are scat-
kitchens, under strict 'J.S. Gov-
tered throughout the Downriver
ernment Inspection and Orthodox
Rabbinical Supervision.
communities, although the syna-
gogue is located in Trenton—and
from their mothers, grandmothers, 1- • 1
IRSPECTEB
mothers-in-law, aunts and friends. •
AND PASSED BY
DEPARTMENT OF
Several men also have contri-
AGRICULTURE
EST.1KZ
buted favorite gustatory gems.
i
..,

Each recipe has been thoroughly •
R.

tested by its contributor.

CHICAGO
IL
ILL
• flAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO

Included in the index are such • •0•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••6•••••••••••111•11••1

I E

s
MARKET
GRUNT ,


• • •

• •



• •

• • •
• • •
• • •
• •

• • •
• • •

• • •
• •
• •


:

:KOSHER u.s.
• ZION

CUSTOM

• • •

Lb.

Consequently, -the book hag' delicacies as blintzes, borsht, M and M Market and at Chelsea
turned out to contain a brief cheese cake, honey cake, tsimis Clothes, Wyandotte, or through
Jewish history, connecting
(stew), kugel (noodle pudding),
Sadick, 2270 Ruskin, Trenton.
ancient historic events with gefilte fish, kasha (buckwheat
modern celebrations of festivals, groats), Kishka (stuffed derma),
FOR THE BEST IN
and the festivals to the creation latkes (pancakes), almond bread,
MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT
of dishes which have acquired matzo balls, apple strudel, knishes,
an almost religious significance and teiglach (honey confection).
because of their associations.
Mrs. Daniel Kaufman, a pro.
And His Orchestra
The continuity of tradition and
fessional artist and writer, illus-
a 5,000-year-old heritage is
trated the book with pen and
D i 1 - 1 609
apparent throughout.
ink drawings. Typing and 'or-
Interspersed with the recipes ganizing of the recipes and index
are vivid tidbits of information were accomplished by Mrs. Paul
YOUR CANDID
regarding the evolution of certain Sadick, of Trenton. Mrs. Kane
and
Mrs.
Kaufman
shared
re-
foods. A random sampling:
Following a recipe for Stuffed sponsibility for writing and
Goose Neck, a note explains that editing.
WILL BE
Other committee members were
"the poor Jewish masses of East-
ern Europe had to make the most Mrs. Ben Rose, of Riverview, Mrs.
of every morsel of food. The Stanley Ellias, Mrs. Max Ellias
women used the neck, feet and and Mrs. Stanley Sava, all of
WHEN PHOTOGRAPHED
gizzards of fowl for soup and dis- Trenton.
BY BERNARD H.
The
book
is
offered
at
$3
a
covered that the skin of the neck
could be filled for a meal. Stuffed copy in these Trenton business
neck (helzel) has become a spe- establishments: Mulias and Ellias
cial dish, often served as a first Department Store, Jane Rose Shop,
course." The stuffing for the neck Uncle Ben's Lounge, Ray's Prime
KE 1-8196
is a delectable concoction of Beef, West Grange Drug, and
onions, chopped beef, seasonings
and parsley.
A recipe for herring salad is
followed by a note explaining that
the Yom Kippur fast forbids eating
From LONDON, ENGLAND
or drinking for 24 hours. There-
fore, because "it is essential for
the body to be replenished with
salt after the fast," herring and
"Distinctive Styling in Music
herring salads have become tra-
to your Individual Taste"
ditional foods on Yom Kippur
night to break the long fast.'
Chick peas, we are informed,
are traditionally served during
Purim, the Feast of Esther, be-
cause "Queen Esther lived largely gefeeemeeme•sees000meseetbsemieeemeesooss

on legumes in order to observe •


the dietary laws in King Alia- •
CONFIRMATION - PARTY TIME...?

suerus' court." Thus, the Jewish •

• •
heroine lives on, not only in the
BE A GUEST AT YOUR OWN PARTY — ORDER YOUR
pages of the Bible, but is honored •

MEAT

yearly by the descendants of the •
OR

people she saved from annihila-

DAIRY

tion.


SUMMER DRAPERY STORAGE

Let our trained technicians take your draperies
down for the summer! Your home will look cooler—
actually stay cooler. We will store your draperies,
cornice boards, etc. in our fully-insured special storage
vaults. Then, in the fall, we will deliver and hang
them for you —"Custom" clean, crisply pleated.

11,

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—LONGER
exclusive DUST
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guards against fading and de-
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DRAPERY CLEANERS
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"ALL THAT THE NAME IMPLIES . '

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• Bedspreads

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