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May 27, 1966 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Studies in Israel, Assisted by the U.S.,
Focus on Accidents and Skin Diseases

JERUSALEM - The incidence
of injuries caused by accidents
at work in Israel is about twice
as high as that in the United
States and Great Britain.
This was revealed recently in a
survey by an Israeli team, headed
by Dr. Kalman J. Manm, director-
general of the Hadassah Medical
Organization. The survey shows
that the highest injury rate in
Israel is in industry; the lowest is
in agriculture. By contrast, the
United States National Health
Survey indicates that the reverse
is true in America. The survey
team believes that this may be due
to the fact that the Israeli is
more accustomed to agricultural
pursuits than he is to industrial
activity.
Working with Dr. Mann are
Dr. J. H. Abramson of the
Hadassah Medical Organization
and two statisticians of Israel's
National Insurance Institute. In
their study, they have analyzed
the relationship between work
injuries and the age, sex, sea-
son, employment status and
economic levels of the workers
employed.

\

Levin's 'Stronghold'
Named Best Jewish
Novel in English

NEW YORK - Meyer Levin's
novel, "The Stronghold" (Simon
and Schuster) has been named
the outstanding English-language
work of fiction of Jewish interest
published in the United States dur-
ing 1965.
Dr. Gilbert Klaperman, presi-
dent of the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board Jewish Book Council
of America, announced that Levin
will receive the $400 Harry and
Ethel Daroff Memorial Award at
the Jewish Book Council's annual
meeting June 1 in Temple Emanu-
El's House in New York. Six other
prizes totaling $2,550 for 1965's
best Jewish books in Jewish
thought, the Nazi Holocaust, Yid-
dish, Hebrew and English poetry
and in the juvenile field will also
be awarded at the annaul meeting.
The $500 Leon Jolson Award
for the best book on the Nazi
Holocaust will go to Zosa Szaj-
kowski for his "Analytical
Franco-Jewish Gazeteer, 1939-
45." Rabbi David Polish will re-
ceive the Frank and Ethel S.
Cohen Award of $400 for the
best book on Jewish thought as
the author of "The Higher Free-
dom, A New Turning Point in
Jewish History" (Quadrangle
Press, Chicago).
The $400 Isaac Siegel Memorial
juvenile Award has been voted to
petty Schechter for "The Dreyfus
,Affair" (Houghton, Mifflin, Bos-
ton). The Harry and Florence Kov-
ner Memorial Awards of $250
each for volumes of poetry will
go to Ruth Finer Mintz in English
poetry for "The Darkening Green"
(Big Mountain Press, Denver); Dr.
Simon Halkin in Hebrew poetry
for "Crossing the Jabbok" (Am
Oved, Tel Aviv); and to Kadia
Molodowsky in Yiddish poetry for
"Licht fun Dorenboim" (Kiyum,
Buenos Aires).

-

Kaiser Appeal Dismissed
by Israel High Court

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

JERUSALEM - Supreme Court

Justice Witkon Tuesday dismissed
an appeal by Kaiser Engineering
Co. against a decision by the Beer-

sheba District Court permitting
the Dead Sea Works Ltd. to con-
fiscate the American firm's equip-
ment at the site of a project for the
Construction of phosphate evapora-
tion dikes at Sdom.
Kaiser had notified the Dead
Sea Works that it could not fulfill
a construction contract because the
specifications were impossible to
achieve. A spokesman for the Dead
Sea Works said that plans were
now being made to continue the
Work started by Kaiser.

In the study - supported by the
Vocational Rehabilitation Admin-
istration of the U. S. Department
of Health, Education and Welfare
- the team found that the injury
rate is much higher among people
under 40 years of age than among
older people, although the latter
suffer more serious injuries. This
may be due to the fact that older
people have safer jobs are more
careful in their work.
At the same time, it was learned,
Israeli men are injured more
often than the women; this might
be explained by the difference in
their occupations alba working
hours. Studies in other countries
have yielded similar findings even
when both sexes are engaged in
the same occupations. On the
other hand, when Israeli women
are injured they tend to stay away
from work for longer periods than
men.
According to the survey, the
rate of accidents is highest dur-
ing the hot months and in the
hot, humid parts of Israel. There
are more accidents during this
period in Tel Aviv than in
Jerusalem, where there is low
humidity in the summer. Climat-
ic conditions also similarly af-
fect the accident rate in the
United States.
Accidents occur more frequently
among employes than among the
self-employed. It was found, how-
ever, that when the self-employed
file for compensation, their claims
cover injuries that are more
serious than those reported by
employes.
The team noted an appreciable
drop in the accident rate with the
institution of safety committees in
the factories. The team called for
improved ventilation and the in-
stallation of air conditioning and
other means of combating climatic
problems in industrial establish-
ments.

,

* * *

The Hadassah-Hebrew Univer-
sity Medical Center is one of the
few hospitals in the world with
an outpatient Department of
Psychosomatic Dermatology to
treat those who suffer from skin
diseases caused or intensified by
emotional disturbance.
Because so many of Israel's
people have come through the
living dealth of concentration -
and prisoner-of-war camps skin
ailments of this kind are prev-
alent. This in turn provides a
unique human laboratory for
comprehensive research and is
expected to yield information
unavailable till now for research
into similar problems in other
countries where there are victims
of such man-made disasters as
national upheavals and air
bombardments.
A grant from the U. S. Depart-

Welfare State Replacing
Cod in Lives of Many,
Claims Dr. Will Herberg

MINNEAPOLIS - While the
role of the welfare state is ex-
panding in the lives of the people,
God and religion have become
more and more marginal, religious
sociologist Dr. Will Herberg said
at the annual convocation of
Northwestern Lutheran Theological
Seminary.
Dr. Herberg said people in
trouble now turn to big govern-
ment for help, whereas in the past
they turned to the church. Dr.
Herberg is a graduate professor
of philosophy and culture at Drew
University.
Dr. Herberg added that as a
result of rapid advances in tech-
nology, man sees himself as re-
placing God. He said the church
should show genuine concern for
persons and for the quality of
personal life, concerning itself with
human beings rather than with
big, impersonal causes and move-
ments.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, May 27, 1966-5

ment of Health, Education and
Welfare Vocational Rehabilitation
Administration to Hadassah's de-
partment of dermatology, headed
by Prof. Felix Sagher, will be
used for a research study of the
rehabilitation of patients suffering
from these psychosomatic skin ail-
ments. Dr. Jacob Shanon, head of
the outpatient department of
psychosomatic dermatology, has
been appointed chief investigator.
* * *
The U. S. Public Health Service's
Heart Disease Control Program
has just issued a five-year research
grant to Prof. Michael Davies, head
of the department of medical
ecology in the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical School.
Research is to be directed at
the prevention of first attacks of
rheumatic fever in school chil-
dren via health surveillance and
prompt detection and treatment of
streptococcal infections.
Five thousand Jerusalem school
children will be examined and ob-
served. Cooperating closely in this
Rtudy will be the municipal health
services, the district health office
of the ministry of health and
pediatricians a n d cardiologists
from Jerusalem's medical agencies.
* * *
Scientists from Harvard Univer-
sity and the Hebrew University-
Hadassah Medical School are col-
laborating in a food and nutrition
research and teaching program.
Dr. Fredrick J. Stare, chairman
of Harvard's department of nutri-
tion, said some of the special areas
of investigation will include nutri-
tive properties of desert plants;
anemias related to dietary lacks;
and factors in childhood over-
weight.

Milton Shapp Runs for Pa. Governor

PHILADELPHIA (JTA)-Milton
Shapp, a Jewish communal leader
and well-known businessman, won
the Democratic nomination for Gov-
ernor of Pennsylvania. He won
over State Senator Robert Casey
who was favored by most Demo-
cratic Party leaders.
Shapp has been active in the

Israel Ministry Vows
Aid to Reform Temple

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

American Jewish Congress and the
Anti-Defamation League. He is be-
lieved to be the first Jew to run
for Governor of Pennsylvania on
a major party ticket. He has a col-
lection of 15 awards, including
organized labor's Good Citizenship
Award of 1963. Unions represent-
ing his employes endorsed him.

SORRY

JERUSALEM - The ministry
for religious affairs announced
here that it will grant assistance
to a Reform synagogue in Upper
Nazareth.
The assurance followed a visit to
the synagogue by a representative
of the ministry who promised that
the house of worship will "not be
discriminated against."

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