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May 27, 1966 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Rabbi Donin Gets Ph. D. June 9;
Thesis Evaluates Detroit Schools

Rabbi Hayim Donin will receive
his Ph. D. degree at the Wayne
State University commencement
exercises in Cobo Hall June 9.
Specializing in the area of phi-
losophy and history of education,
his doctoral thesis was on the sub-
ject "A Critical Inquiry Into the
Value Presuppositions Underlying
Jewish Education in Metropolitan
Detroit."
Rabbi Donin, who was ordained
at Isaac Elchanan Theological Sem-
inary, earned his B.A. at Yeshiva

RABBI HAYINI DONIN

University and his M.A. at Colum-
bia University. In the former he
specialized in chemistry and in
the latter in guidance and coun-
seling.
In his thesis for his Ph.D.,
Rabbi Donin reviewed thorough.
ly, and in the main obejctively,
the various functioning schools
in Detroit, their curricula, and
their ideological approaches.
He indicates, in one of his sum-
maries, that "significant differ-
ences are to be found in the cur-
ricula and texts followed by the
Reform group, and those followed
by the secular Yiddish group." He
then states:
"It was found by this writer that
no significant differences are to be
found either in the texts used in
the basic curriculum followed in
the Orthodox, Conservative and
community schools." But he as-
serts that "it must be presumed
that even among the latter three
groups the treatment of at least
some of the subjects studied will
vary considerably from group to
group depending upon their ap-
proach to ceremonial laws and to
principles of faith."
Reviewing the objectives of the
community schools — United He-
brew Schools — as well as the
Conservative, Orthodox, Reform,
Yiddish and secular educational
groups, Rabbi Donin has made a
deep study of underlying values,

DAYENI

pursuing numerous comparisons on
the basis of historical analyses of
traditional Jewish educational ex-
periences.
The teaching of Hebrew, the
Siddur, history, laws and cus-
toms and religious beliefs is
under scrutiny, and educational
implications and current pro-
posals are indicated.
Many charts are the result of
Rabbi Donin's studies and re-
searches during which factual data
was accumulated, teachers were
interviewed and schools' super-
visors were consulted.
One of the most illuminating
charts deals with the emphasis on
subject areas. There was the Yes
reply to the teaching of Hebrew
reading, teaching of history and
principles of faith and Jewish life
in America by all the schools.
Siddur and Humash are taught by
all the schools except the com-
bined Jewish school. Conversation_
al Hebrew is taught only in the
Orthodox, Conservative, communi-
ty and labor Zionist schools. Yid-
dish grammar and conversational
Yiddish are limited to the labor
Zionist and combined Jewish
school.
Laws and customs are taught in
all but the labor Zionist and com-
bined Jewish school. The Mishna
studies are offered only in the
Right Orthodox and Orthodox
schools. State of Israel and cur-
rent events courses are given in
all the schools except the Right
Orthodox.
There is a vast amount of in-
formation in Rabbi Donin's study.
It will no doubt serve as a guide
in seeking information about the
Detroit Jewish school system, and
other communities will undoubt-
edly find great interest in it as
an application to their own needs
and conditions.

WJCongress Plans Body
to Study Jewish Affairs

LONDON (JTA) — The govern-
ing council of the World Jewish
Congress decided to set up in Lon-
don an Institute of Jewish Affairs
which will act as a research body .
for contemporary Jewish studies.
Some of the work of the institute
will continue to be centered in
New York.
Dr. S. J. Roth will be director of
the institute here. Two scholars
will act as research advisers. They
are Dr. Julius Gould, professor of
sociology at Nottingham Univer-
sity; and Dr. Lionel Kochan, reader
in modern European history at the
University of East Anglia.

ORT's Schools

Nearly 20,000 persons are en-
rolled in ORT vocational schools
in 17 countries throughout the
world. About 75 per cent of them
are in Israel.

BY HENRY LEONARD1

WSU Dedicates Malbin
Memorial Theater Library

Wayne State University dedicat-
ed the new Lisette Freund Malbin
Memorial Library for the theater
arts during ceremonies at the Hil-
berry Classic Theater May 19.
The library, containing several
rare volumes, was established in
memory of his wife by Dr. Barnett
Malbin, a Detroit orthodontist.
Believed to be the only one of its
kind in the state, the library will be
temporarily housed above the foyer
of the.Hilberry Theater. It will con-
tain 1000 volumes, plus recordings
of plays by famous actors and
actresses of the English-speaking
stage.
Rare volume will include O'Dell's
"Complete Annals of the New York
Stage to 1895," all editions of Gor-
don Craig's "Masque," a rare thea-
trical magazine published from
1904 to 1911, and complete volumes
of America's lost plays.
Dr. William R. Feast, WSU pres-
ident, acknowledged the gift on be-
half of the university. Rabbi Rich-
ard Hertz of Temple Beth El par-
ticipated in the program.
Mrs. Malbin, in whose memory
the library was dedicated, was af-
filiated with the Michigan Reper-
tory Players and the Lydia Mendel-
sohn Theater in Ann Arbor in
1931-32. She was a member of the
Civic Repertory Theater in New
York in 1935 and served as stage
manager for the Chicago company
of the play "Dead End" in 1936.
She died in 1961
The library will serve chiefly
as a research center for advanced
theater students, according to WSU
Theater Director Leonard Leone.

`Refractions,' Essays in Comparative
Literature Discussed by Prof. Levitt

In "Refractions—Essays in Com-
parative Literature," published by
Oxford University Press (417 5th,
NY16), Prof. Harry Levin, head
of the department of comparative
literature at Harvard University,
has incorporated 18 of his essays,
some being texts of lectures he has
delivered.
Explaining refraction as "the
fact or phenomenon of a ray of
light, heat, the sight of being di-

the reader and the student toward
social spheres, censorship, modern-
ist scopes, and a score of other re-
lated topics.
Commencing with the "Seman-
tics of Culture," Prof. Levin dis-
cusses the meaning of myths, tra-
ditionalism and realism in litera-
ture, all in their relation to nu-
merous literary experiences.
In "Literature and Exile" there
are challenging views on Paster-
nak, Pound, Mann and other
world famous figures.
English Renaissance and Shake-
speare add masterfully to discus-
sions of literary themes that relate
to discussion of comparative writ-
ings.
Then there are discussions of
sociology in the novel, of the role
of women in literature and a score
of other important themes that ele-
vate "Refractions" to an important
role in modern literary criticism.

verted of deflected from its pre-
vious course in passing obliquely
out of one medium into another of

different density," Prof. Levin
states: "If we let that ray of light
stand for communication or
expression, then we may assume
that whatever turn it takes is de-
termined by the nature of the me-
dium."
His aim therefore is to "transfer
the term from physics to critcism."
He applies it to literature and con-
siders it a refraction rather than
a reflection of life.
"To be educated," he declares,
"is to be liberated, so far as
one's personal limitations per-
mit, from the provincialism of
subcultures."
His contention is that "an Amer-
ican cannot understand himself un-
til he begins to grasp the idea of
Europe. Speaking and writing En-
glish with a difference, he ap
proaches English literature from a
distance, with elective sympathy
rather than ancestral piety. . . .
He should have no misgivings .. .
about the present as a vantage
point for taking stock of inherited
treasure and accumulated research
—a spectacle so absorbing and
panoramic that conclusions from
it are bound to be tentative and
Michael Kurtz, son of Mr. and reports of it fragmentary."
Mrs. Eli Kurtz, 17625 Goldwin,
His thematic approaches direct
Southfield, and Michael Weiner,
son of Mrs. Diane Weiner, 24151
SUPERB FULL-COURSE
Ridgedale, Oak Park, were called
to the Torah last weekend at Cong.
Bnai David in observance of their
PRIVATE MEETING ROOM
becoming Bnai Mitzvah. The Jew-
COMPLETE FACILITIES FOR PARTIES,
ish News regrets their names were
BANQUETS, STAGS — SPECIAL RATES
omitted from the synagogue list-
ing last Friday.
STAN LEY

Sigma Delta Pi, fraternal so-
cial club, will hold a rush party
8 p.m. today at the home of Dave
Rubin, 18981 Woodingham. Re-
freshments will be served. For in-
formation, call Denny Dix, UN 4-
0763.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, May 27, 1966-17

The CARIBE MOTEL
PROVIDES YOUR
OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS
WITH . . .

CONVENIENT LOCATION

I Bnai Mitzvah I

Woodward near 7 Male Rd.
Minutes away from everything

LUXURIOUS ROOMS

• Phones • Air Conditioning
• Complete Kitchens
• Wall-to-Wall Carpeting

COMPLETE
ACCOMMODATIONS
AT NO EXTRA COST

• TV and Radio • Parking
• Continental Breakfast

STEAK DINNERS

PHONE
TO 8-2662

Rates
Moderate
Start at
$8.00

r

Michigan poultrymen last year
received more than $34,000,000
for eggs produced. This produc-
tion amounted to 1,265,000,000
eggs, which would make quite an
omlet. The state is 21st in produc-
tion rank and imports eggs from
other states to supply the demand.

STEAMER,

STEAM BATH .Arqr, HEALTH CLUE

STEAM ROOM • MASSAGES • SUN BATH
EXERCISE ROOM . SLUMBER LOUNGE
RECREATION LOUNGE with RESTAURANT

COOLIDGE HWY. at CAPITAL • OAK PARK
(bet. 8 and 9 Mile) Phone 544-3611

Near 7 Mile Road

19630

‘Woodward

NORTHLAND FORD

10 MILE AND GREENFIELD • OAK PARK • LI 8 0800

-

NORM RUBY

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Public:
This is how we at Northland Ford feel about you . . . as our customers.

A Customer . . .

Is the most important person ever in our dealership.

A Customer . . .

Is not dependent on us . . . we are dependent on him.

A Customer . .

Is not an interruption of our work . . he is the purpose of it. We are not doing him a
favor by serving him .. he is doing us a favor by giving us the opportunity to do so.

A Customer . . .

Is not an outsider to our business . . . he is part of it.

A Customer . . •

Is not someone to argue or match wits with. Nobody ever won an argument with a
customer.

A Customer . . •

Is a person who brings us his wants. it is our job to handle them profitably to him and
ourselves.

A Customer . .

Is our business . .

our profits

our life's blood.

We wish to thank our many customers for their past patronage and look forward to
serving you in the future — without you there would be no Northland Ford.

Copr. 1966, Dayenu Productions

Sincerely,
NORM RUBY

Sales Representative

Sincerely,

ED

KASPARIAN

PRESIDENT, NORTHLAND FORD

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