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May 20, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Great Society Programs Raising
NewProblems,Social'WorkersTold

The
WASHINGTON (JTA)
question whether President John-
son's "Great Society" programs
are on a "collision course" with
nongovernmental welfare agencies
—Jewish and non-Jewish — was
raised here at the 68th annual
meeting of the National Confer-
ence of Jewish Communal Service.
The five-day parley, attended by
more than 1,000 Jewish communal
workers, was devoted to the sub-
ject of how the Jewish community
is to face the Great Society.
Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg,' ex-
ecutive director of the Combined
Jewish Philanthropies of Boston,
who delivered the keynote address,
told the Jewish professional work-
ers in the fields of Jewish welfare,
health and communal services ga-
thered from all parts of the coun-
try that, "in ever-increasing _mea-
sure, Jewish communal services
may need to focus on quality and
intensity rather than on quantita-
tive coverage of all segments of
the Jewish community and all
areas of need."

Pointing out that, while the
Great Society has been descri-
bed as "an unprecedented series
of legislative triumphs in all
areas of social and economic
welfare," and "a massive at-
tack on poverty and other forms
of deprivation supported by-
massive funds," Dr. Rosenberg
stated that it has also been
labeled as "a maze of national,
regional and local conflicts and
irritations with the inevitable
political road block, putting
more emphasis on quantity
rather than quality of services."

He outlined a number of issues
"which are already keenly felt or
which will inevitably and profound-
ly affect Jewish communal serv-
ices."
These include:
1. The bandwagon psychology—
with a tendency for institutions
and practitioners to rush to find
a niche for themselves in the pro-
gram of the Great Society—to the
possible detriment of ongoing pro-
grams.
2. The extent of planning which
can realistically be achieved in the
face of the increasing flow of gov-
ernment funds.
3. The increasing acuteness of
the. manpower problems with the
exciting and challenging vistas of
the Great Society threatening an
exodus of trained personnel froth
the field which already is suffer-
ing from shortages.
4. The meaning of the Great So-
ciety to middle-class structures
and values wihch have been the
focus of Jewish communal services.

5. The increase in church-state
infractions and the rationaliza-
tion for accepting them.

6. The gap between the princi-
ples and programs of the Great
Society and the readiness of the
Jewish community leadership to
move to-wards their implementa-
tion.
Calling "comprehensiveness,

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continuity and community" key
concepts underlying the major leg-
islative acts of the Great Society,
Dr. Rosenberg stated that "a sig-
nificant aspect of communal serv-
ice is the development of a Jewish
community leadership corps—both
lay and professional."
Associate Professor Arnold Gur-
in of Brandeis University reviewed
various approaches to defining a
rationale for Jewish sectarian
services in the new climate of the
Great Society. His theme was
"Sectarianism — A Value Dilem-
ma." A large number of position
papers was offered by leading
practitioners in various fields of
Jewish communal service on the
current status of their particular
areas of practice.

These papers described how
Jewish communal services have
organized to meet the develop-
ing needs of . the American Jew ,
ish community as it exists today,
against the background of the
Great Society era.

They also presented unresolved
problems - facing the Jewish corn-
munity, including questions of
Jewish identification, continuity
and issues like anti-Semitism and
Jewish education.
A main question asked was whe-
ther access to _jobs, affluence and
status, with accompanying freer
social associations, will undermine
the sense of belonging to a dis-
tinct and unique Jewish com-
munity.
Resolutions emphasized the need
for peaceful settlement of world
dispirtes. One measure stated:
"We favor policies of the U.S. gov-
ernment which are rooted in the
goals of peace and world order,
since these are basic conditions for
the well-being of Jews and of all
humanity ." Other resolutions
urged American ratification of the
United States convention on geno-
tide and other UN human right-
treaties.
Efforts to relieve discrimination
against Soviet Jewry were endor-
sed. Concern was voiced about the
security of Israel and efforts were
asked for new American steps to
'promote regional ne-ace.

A federal housing and urban
development official said Tues-
day that we viewed Jewish com-
munal service "as an essential
partner in the national effort"
to produce solutions to the prob-
lems of American urbanization.

Robert C. Wood, undersecretary
of the U.S. Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Development, told
the 1,000 delegates that "as we
begin the experimental programs.
you will be called on to lend your
services to the solving of a whole
range of human problems."
William Avrunin, executive di-
rector of the .Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration of Detroit, was elected
president of the conference, suc-
ceeding Maurice Bernstein.
Milton Goldman, executive di-

rector of the Baltimore Jewish
Family and Children's Service,
told the conference that while the
American Society is considered
affluent, a considerable hard core
of poor Jewish families and indi-
viduals continue to need direct
cash relief.
Samuel Lerner, executive direc_
for of Detroit's Jewish Family and
Children's Services, also took part
in the proceedings.
* * *

Airs Jews in Modern Era

Social Studies Parley

Rabbi Sherwin T. Wine, of Bir-
mingham, Mich., and Hans
-Jonas, professor of philosophy on
the graduate faculty of political
and social science at the New
School for Social Research.
The meeting was held at the
YIVO Institute for Jewish Re-
search, and marked the annual
session of the Conference on Jew-
ish Studies. The organization seeks
to promote, by means of scientific
tudy and research. a better un-
derstanding of the .position of the
Jews in the modern world.

NEW YORK (JTA) — About 250
Jewish social scientists - and com-
munal leaders engaged this week
in a two-day meeting convened by
the Conference on Jewish Social
Studies to discuss the relationship
between the Jewish religion in the
current era, the aesthetics of Jew-
ish religious culture and modern
thinking.
With Dr. Joseph Blau, profes-
sor of religion at Columbia Uni-
versity, as moderator, the dis-
cussions re volved principally
about two papers, presented by

Heads
Social Workers

A vrunin

William Avrunin, executive di-
rector of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration of Detroit, was elected
president, of the National Confer-
ence of Jewish Communal Service
Tuesday, at its 68th annual meet-

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LEONARD N. SIMONS

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Leonard and Harriette Simons Forest

WILLIAM AVRUNIN

ing in Washington,. D.C. He suc-
ceeds Maurice Bernstein of New
York.
Avrunin became executive direc-
tor of Detroit's Jewish Welfare
Federation in 1964, after serving
as associate director since 1948. A
graduate of Ohio State University,
he did graduate wo•k School
of Applied Social Sciences at
Western Reserve University.
His early professional experi-
ence was in the casework field at
the Jewish Board of Guardians in
New York City. In 1943-45 he was
executive director of the Fart
Wayne, Ind., Jewish Federation,
and subsequently became regional
director for the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds.
He has lectured at the Univer-
sity of Michigan School of Social
Work and the Training Bureau of
Jewish Communal Service and he
was formerly editor of the Fact
and Opinion Department of the
Journal of Jewish Communal Serv-
ice.
In 1962-63, Avrunin was director
-of a study of fund-raising in Israel
under the auspices of the Council
of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds, the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, and the Jewish Agency.
He was president of the Nation-
al Committee for Big Brother and
Big Sister Service in 1942, and for
the past year served as first vice-
president of the National Confer-
ence of Jewish Communal Service.

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HEBREW UNION COLLEGE—JEWISH INSTITUTE OF RELIGION

rodicei46.30

,tnex 7:00

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.Avaipmviat

Maxwell Jospey, Dinner Chairman

Dora Ehrlich and Abe Kasle, Honorary -Chairmen

Judge Theodore Levin,- Toastmaster



contact

If you wish to attend — please

the

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

Phone: 864-2767

18414 Wyoming, Detroit 48221

Security Prize Goes
to Israel's, Dr. Bergmann

TEL AVIV—(JTA)—Prof. Ernst
David Bergmann, who was chair-
man of Israel's Atomic Energy
Commission for 15 years, received
Israel's annual Defense Forces
Prize at ceremonies over which
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol pre-
sided May 13.
The premier, who is also minis-
ter of defense, cited Dr. Berg-
mann for his over-all "important
contribution to the establishment
and development of defense scien-
tific research since Israel attained
its independence."
Eshkol awarded the prize also to
several other recipients for "im-
portant achievements in a vital
field of security activity," without
identifying the specific nature of
the activity. The others included
a team of researchers, among
them, Uri Even-Toy, an 'aeronau-
tic engineer, and an Israeli naval
officer, Michael Harel.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
8—Friday, May 20, 1966

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