100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 29, 1966 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE JEWISH NEWS

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle conimencing with issue of July 20. 1951

Member American Association of English—Jewish Newspapers, Michigan Press Association, National Editorial
Association.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17100 West Seven Mile Road, Detroit, Mich. 48235.
VE 8-9364. Subscription $6 a year. Foreign S7.
Second Class Postage Paid at Detroit, Michigan

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ

SIDNEY SHMARAK

CHARLOTTE HYAMS

Editor and Publisher

Business Manager

Advertising Manager

City Editor

Sabbath Scriptural Selections
This Sabbath, the 10th day of Iyar, 5726, the following scriptural selections will
be read in our synagogues:
Pentateuchal portion: Lev. 16:1-20:27; Prophetical portion: Amos 9:7-15

Licht Benshen, Friday, April 29, 7:10 p.m.

VOL. XLIX. No. 10

Page 4

April 29, 1966

Unaffiliated Must Respond to Campaign

A new record in giving is expected to be the campaign office, on their own to make
set by the Detroit JeWish community when their contributions to this year's great needs.
the Allied Jewish Campaign holds its victory Then it will truly be said that this is a corn-
dinner next Wednesday evening. Good direc- munity of rahamanim bnai rahamanim—the
tion, and ability to reach out to many quarters merciful children of the merciful—and that
and a well-trained corps of solicitors account we are not only generous in our giving but
for the results attained. thus far. that-We also are approaching totality in com-
munal enrollment for communal good.
With less than a week left to complete The need for increased 'generosity to the
the task, there nevertheless remains the re- current campaign is continually emphasized
sponsibility to reach several thousand more by new happenings in our midst. The Middle
people who have not yet been enrolled as East situation demands unceasing , concern
contributors, who, as of this writing, are over Israel's status. The conditions behind
among the unaffiliated in the most important the Iron Curtain and in Moslem countries
community project in behalf of the major demand an alertness in handling migration
local, national and overseas causes. problems. The uninterrupted stream of immi-
No matter how great the result of the grants who are settling in Israel add to the
current solicitations, even if the highest responsibilities to assure the proper integra-
record ever attained will have been exceeded, tion of the dispossessed among the elements
unless the thousands who should be partners already well established in Israel.
in the great humanitarian effort have been
Then there are the domestic requirements
enlisted in the drive there will be that short- to assure the continued support for our edu-
coming of an incomplete enrollment.
cational and cultural, as well as the social
During the days ahead, therefore, it is service and recreational needs, of a vast com-
urgent that the unaffiliated should be reach-' munity.
These add up to serious duties. They must
ed. And during that short period there de-
volves upon those who have not been contact- be fulfilled. They can and undoubtedly will
ed by volunteer workers, or who have not be honored through the Allied Jewish Cam-
responded properly, to call in their gifts to paign.

Migratory Trends: Panic MUST Be Prevented

The established fact is that crime can not
Predictions made in a recent report
be attributed to a single race. Recent happen-
resulting from studies of migratory trends in
our community that Detroit, like Cleveland, ings have shown that some of the worst
may see a drastic reduction in the Jewish crimes were committed by irrational and
crazed persons whose skins are light. At the
population,
due to
the a movements
to the same time, we know that educational stand-
suburbs, brought
forth
series of protests.
Complaints are especially based on the be- ards have lowered in certain areas, but the
of this pressures
fact ought and,
to go instead,
a long way
liefs that such reports inspire rather than recognition
in discouraging
in
reduce panic. And there are many who dis-
agree with the results and are of the opinion facilitating cooperative offorts to make im-
that efforts leadina towards redemption of provements.
neighborhoods and
b their retention are suc-
• Meanwhile, insofar as the Detroit Jewish
ceeding.
community is concerned, the established fact
Views are mounting that it is possible to is that more than 60 per cent of the Jews in
integrate a community, that the aim of a our midst retain their residences in the city
wholesome American city should be to assure proper. Less than a third of Metropolitan De-
security and the best homes for all elements. troit's Jewish population lives in the suburbs.
There is a growing feeling that our educa- This should be an encouragement to those
tional programs can be improved upon, that who are determined to retain Detroit's status
there is no reason for a flight to private as a great Jewish center wherein Jews reside
schools, as has been indicated by figures in large numbers.
showing that 40 per cent of Detroit's chil-
Efforts of those who are striving to retain
dren
no
longer
are
in
the
public
school
their
residences within the city deserve all
system.
the help and encouragement that can be
The entire issue is so challenging, the given them. Those who have conducted re-
new developments are so serious, that refusals search would do well to delve further into
to accept current figures as assured facts for developing conditions.
the future must be accepted as indications
Albert- Mayer
first reported
of a growing insistence that Americans should the When
drastic Dr.
neighborhood
changes
10 years
deal with the problems realistically, that the ago, he warned that efforts must be exerted

law
of the
land to
should
by their
all to
too been
rapid
a change
in Jewry.
the areas
available
means
protect be
our honored
cities and
that prevent
have since
lost
to Detroit
He

Classic by Orthodoxy's Interpreter

Hirsch's Psalms Commentary
Notes Divine Law Universality

Dr. Samson Raphael Hirsch, the great interpreter of Orthodoxy,
whose views are accepted as most authoritative in delineating the tradi-
tional Jewish views on life and in interpreting-Scriptures, was known
for his voluminous commentary- on the Psalms. The first portion - of
this commentary already has appeared in an English translation and its
conclusion—books, 3, 4 and 5—rendered into English by Gertrude
Hirschler, has just been published by Philipp Feldheim (96 E. B'way,
NY 2).

Rabbi Hirsch's . "The Psalms" commences with Psalm LXXIII and
concludes with the last, CL. It contains in translation all of the Hirsch
commentaries on the 78 psalms in this volume.

Every underlying idea in each of the psalms is defined by Rabbi
Hirsch. The eminent scholar views the psalms as a guide to an under-
standing of the Almighty's influence on the development of the Jewish
people and of the world's nations.

Mankind in its totality is under providential influence as seen
in "Conimentary on the Psalms."

Psalm CXVII, which commences with the sentence "0 proclaim
the praise of the Lord's mighty acts, all you nations; laud Him, all you
tribes of mankind," is marked by this ,comment:

"Hallu is a call which the redeemed nation of Israel will one day
address to the rest of mankind, summoning them all to render homage
to the Lord."

Throughout, there is that universalism. For instance, the verse (14)
in CXL, "Only the righteous will render homage to Thy Name; only
the straightforward shall find a permanent dwelling before Thy coun-
tenance," is thus evalUated:

"Not the word of praise. alone, but only righteous conduct and
duty faithfully done, constitute the true worship of God. Only
those who, without deviation, live by the calling assigned them
by God will find a permanent position before the countenance of
the Lord, who watches over all things and provides for all."

An -oft-repeated admonition not to trust in princes, CXLVI:3 —
"Al tivt'khu bindivim"—"Put not your trust in noble men, nor in a
son of man, with whom help is not," is interestingly explained. Since
the phrase follows the "I will sing to my God" in the preceding sen-
tence," Rabbi Hirsch points out:

"The Psalmist says :`If I survive despite adverse fate, then I attri-
bute my survival to the help of- God. We are not justified in putting
our trust in anyone other than the Lord. We are not to put our trust
in nedivim, for they are nothing more than mere humans who, even
if they wish to help, simply do not have in their hands the power
to do so.' "

institutions. reiterates such warnings in relation to Oak
As has been indicated in these columns Park and to the extreme Northwest. By con-
The divine Law for all peoples is especially directly indicated in
on avoided
numerous
occasions,
the
most to
certed
perhaps further deteriorations
be
and
especially
to danger
be regretted
is can
be action,
avoided.
another comment:
the spread of panic. Dame Rumor has been
"Psalm 148 sang of that time when all of God's creatures, with-
We look forward to and hope for a stab-
menacing race relationships, and every effort
trusted to Israel is nothing else but the application to and for man
must be made to eliminate this ugly appari- ilization that: \NTHl put an end to all rumors
of the same Divine Law which is the working, shaping force in all
tion from our midst.
and to the witches' tales that lead to panic.
of the rest of Creation, and upon which depends the welfare and

Problem Posed by Daylight Saving Law

Daylight Saving Time has become a fact as late as 10 p. m. in certain periods on Sab-
by Congressional action which, has received baths; that there would be untold difficulties
the President's signature. Now it develops, for caterers who would have to start serving
as has been adequately indicated by Rabbi meals after the Sabbath close to midnight;
Hayim Donin, that the new regulation, if that on Yom Kippur the fast would not end
applied to Michigan which has until now been until 8:45 p. m.
unaffected by daylight saving regulations,
There is a way out for Michigan: rever-
will create great inconvenience to observant sion to Central Time for our state. If this
Jews.
could be attained, the problem would be
Rabbi Donin has explained that there solved for Jewish religious observers and
would be hardships, under DST, in reli- foz. Um farmers who are strongly opposed to
gious observances which, would be prolonged . the,new regulation adopted by Congress.

happiness of all living things. If this is so, then it is quite obvious
that this Law, in the sum total of its purpose, reaches out far
beyond Israel to include the salvation of all of mankind . . ."
At the same time there is the interpretation of the role of Israel
among the nations, as in this comment:
"Psalm 148 sang of that time when all of God's creatures, with-
out exception, will render Him homage. At that time Israel will reach
the goal of its mission at last, and it will rise again in its ancient
splendor. Then all the others throughout the earth who have dedicated
themselves to God with devotion will also receive the recognition that
is justly theirs, and they will join Israel, the nation which has been
near to Him from the very beginning."
An appendix explains the accents appearing in the Book of Psalms.
The Psalms are in Hebrew, with the English translations in parallel
columns and the commentaries at the bottom of the pages in this 500-
page volume.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan