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April 29, 1966 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Chabad Dinner May 16 to Honor Five Detroiters;
Aid for Hassidic Movement Noted Here, in Israel

Mrs. Hordes

Mrs. Kurtzman

The Chabad Lubavitch silver
anniversary dinner, May 16, at the
L-atin Quarter will honor five lead-
ing Detroiters for their dedicated
services locally and in Israel to the
Lubavitcher movement.
They are: Charles E. Feinberg,
chairman of the campaign corn-

Mrs. Schaver

mittee of Camp Gan Israel in Fen-
ton, Mich.; Harry L. Schumer,
chairman of the vocational schools
committee of Kfar Chabad in Isra-
el; Mrs. William Hordes, devoted
supporter of Camp Gan Israel;
Mrs. Rachel Kurtzman of the De-
troit Committee for the Medical

Israeli is Among 15 Jews Elected
to the National Academy of Sciences

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

WASHINGTON (JTA)—A noted
Israeli physicist is among the 15
Jewish scientists chosen by the
National Academy of Sciences in
electing 42 new members Tuesday
in recognition of accomplishment
in a wide range of scientific fields.
The Israeli member is Dr. Eph-
raim Katchalski, head of the de-
partment of biophysics at Weiz-
mann Institute of Science and
winner of many awards for his
work in that field.
The new American Jewish mem-
bers include:
Dr. Paul. Berg of the Stanford
University School of Medicine;
Dr. Jacob Bigeleisen of the
Brookhaven National Laboratory;
Dr. Bernard B. Brodie of the
National Heart Institute;
Norman Henry Giles of Yale Uni-
versity;
Clifford Grobstein of the Univer-
sity of California at San Diego;
Jacob. George Harrar of the
Rockefeller Foundation;
Arthur Kantrowitz of the AVCO
Corporation;
Dr. Irving Kaplansky of the Uni-
versity of Chicago;

Torahs Destroyed..
in Seminary Fire

NEW YORK (JTA) — Officials
of the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary, the educational arm of Con-
servative Judaism, estimated last
weekend that restoration and re-
placeinent of losses suffered in the
disastrous April 18 fire in the
Seminary library will cost ' , about
$2,000,000 and take a year and a
half to complete.
Chancellor Louis Finkelstein told
a press conference that the Ford
Foundation had granted the JTS
5100,000 for the repair and salvage
program. He estimated that about
60,000 books — about one third of
the Seminary's collection — had
been .destroyed and about 30,000
others were damaged beyond re-
pair. Forty Torahs, including some
from Poland, were also destroyed.
Although the New York City Fire
Marshall's office said that after
four days of investigation it had not
found evidence of arson, Dr. Finkel-
stein said he thought the blaze was
incendiary. He said the fire had
been preceded by three earlier
ones in recent weeks, the first fires
since 1929.
Aided by Christian students
from the nearby Union Theologi-
cal Seminary, 800 of the Jewish
Seminary students formed a
human chain to pass down by
hand from the library tower to
the basement gymnasium, many
thousands of books, some charred,
some water-logged and soggy.
The books were taken then to
a special laboratory for careful
treatment and drying. Rare books
and manuscripts, housed in vaults,

escaped damage.

Philip Levine of the Ortho Re-
_
search Foundation;
Nathan M. Newmark of the Uni-
versity of Illinois;
Ephraim Ranker of the Public
Health Research Institute of the
City of New York..
Harold A. Scheraga of Cornell
University;
Samuel I. Weissman of Washing-
ton University.
Charles Yanofsky of Stanford
University.

Outline Features
in Jewish Agency
Reorganization

NEW YORK (JTA)—Details of
the reorganization of the basic
structure of the Jewish Agency for
Israel in line with decisibns adopt-
ed at the last World Zionist Con-
gress in Jerusalem, were disclosed
at a press conference here April
20 by Aryeh L. Pincus, chairman
of the agency executive.
Pincus, on a three-week visit to
this country, said that the initial
changes already in the first stages
of implementation, are aimed at
solving the • problems of "over-
centralization" and "duplication"
in the day-to-day work of the
agency.
Under the new system which is
already functioning in Israel and
which will shortly be implemented
in the American section, each of
the five executive committees,
which will be working bodies
rather than advisory units, will
bear responsibility for the areas
formerly under the direction of
department heads which were
found to be related in function and
purpose.
Stressing the urgency of the
reorganization in the fields of
immigration and absorption, the
agency head noted that, over the
next four to five years, a total
of some 250,000 Jewish immi-
grants are expected to come to
Israel from "areas of distress."
He said the problem was par-
ticularly acute in the case of the
absorption of large numbers of
newcomers from Moslem lands
where the cultural lag was
greatest.
The new structural changes in
the agency setup, Pincus said, are a
result of the current effort at
"self examination" by the organ-
ization, of its functions and activi-
ties.
Another aim of the agency re-
view and reorganization program,
he said, was the achievement of
a greater degree of unity among
Zionist organizations throughout
the world. While these groups "do
an enormous amount of work,"
Pincus stressed that it was im-
portant to minimize "fragmen-
tation" in the movement. In this
area, he declared, "we are seeking
ways of cooperation so that the
concept of Jewish peoplehood
might mean something."

Center in Kfar Chabad, and Mrs.
Morris L. Schaver, chairman of the
women's Chabad Lubavitch com-
mittee.
Feinberg, together with the late
William Hordes, initiated the pur-
chase of Camp Gan Israel from
the Boy Scout movement. He is
especially interested in this proj-
ect because has long been in-
terested in the welfare of youth
and is a leader in the Boy Scout
movement. Feinberg also dedi-
cated the first cabin at Camp Gan
Israel in memory of Fred M. But-
zel. Mr. and Mrs. Hordes were in-
strumental in helping to finance
the purchase of the camp and last
year $55,000 was raised through
the William Hordes Memorial
Fund to remodel the camp facili-
ties and the main building was
named in memory of Mr. Hordes.
Mrs. Hordes and the family are
continuing the work.
Mrs. Schaver's parents, Jacob
and Anna Lazaroff, who were fol-
lowers of the Chabad Lubavitch
movement, left a bequest to build
a dormitory in Kfar Chabad, Isra-
el. The children, including the
Schaver, Lazaroff and Tenenbaum
families, completed -the building of
a student dormitory costing
$250,000, bearing the name Beth
Lazaroff. Last year a new sanctu-
ary was dedicated at Kfar Chabad
in memory of Anna Lazaroff,
mother of Mrs. Schaver and 20
members of the three families
were at the dedication ceremonies.
The family recently also dedi-
cated a Hasidic library, in memo-
ry of their parents, at Cong. Mish-
kan Israel Nusach H'Ari-Lubavit-
cher Center. Their father, the late
Jacob Lazaroff, was a member for
many years at this synagogue and
served as its secretary.
Mrs. Kurtzmann, who is a de-
scendant of Hassidim, has been
active in the Chabad movement for
many years. A room at Beth Laz-
aroff has been dedicated in her
parents' name. Now she is working
to help complete the new medical
center building at Kfar Chabad.
Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch, the
educational arm of the Lubavit-
cher movement, began its activities
in the United States 25 years ago.
It was initiated by the late Rabbi
Joseph I. Schneersohn, world lead-
er of the Lubavitcher. The aim of
Merkos has been "to promote
Jewish religious education among
the younger generation in the spir-
it of authentic Torah-true Juda-
- ism."
Avern Cohen will be the dinner
chairman. A committee meeting of
the volunteer workers will be held
Tuesday, 8 p.m., at the home of
the chairman.
Senator Wayne Morse of Oregon
will be the guest speaker at the
dinner. For reservations, call the
Lubavitch regional office, 14000
W. Nine Mile Rd., Oak Park, 544-
7168.

Arab Plot Fails Withillr.Than,t

BY SAUL CARSON

JTA Correspondent at the UN
(Copyright, 1966, JTA, Inc.)

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. —
Arab delegations here have kicked
up a storm about the Arab refugee
question by inviting Secretary-Gen-
eral U Thant to visit the refugee
camps. The 12 Arab ambassadors
who extended that invitation in
writing warned about the deficit
facing the United Nations Relief
and Works Agency for Palestine
Refugees, and spoke ominously
about the "deteriorating conditions
of the refugees and the prevailing
dangerous situation" in the area
where the refugees live (Jordan,
Lebanon, Syria and the Gaza
Strip).

Well, the storm blew up a lot of
sand — right back into the Arab
faces. Mr. Thant has rejected the
invitation. He left open a crack in
the door, noting that "whenever it
-may_ become clearly apparent to
me that a visit to the area and to
the refugee camps would produce
some specific, positive and bene-

Israel Population Leaps
to 2,600,000 in 1966

TEL AVIV (ZINS) — The
population of Israel now has
reached a total of 2,600,000, an
increase of 75,000, over the pre-
vious year. The number of
Jewish residents is 2,300,000, or
60,000 more than the previous
year.

In 1948, when the state was
established, the number of
Jewish inhabitants of the coun-
try totaled only 650,000.

Employment is now at a peak
of 910,000 as compared with
586,000 in 1955—the number of
unemployed persons is only 3
per cent of the labor -force, as
compared with 7 per cent in
1955.
In 1956 297,090 tourists who
visited the country brought in
$55,000,000, whereas in 1949
Israel attracted only 22,000
tourists.

ficial results, I will not hesitate to
make such a visit."
But that's not what the Arab
states wanted. They had been in-
structed by the last Arab summit
meeting in Cairo to raise the refu-
gee question now, as a matter of
immediate urgency. Mr. Thant
didn't see things that way. Neither,
for that matter, did Israel.
Israel's Ambassador Michael S.
Comay had gone to see Mr. Thant
after the Arab invitation had been
sent to the UN chief. Later, Mr.
Comay wrote a formal letter on
the issue, characterizing the Arab
move as one motivated by propa-
ganda reasons.
The Secretary-General noted in
his reply to the Arabs that the
refugee issue is under annual re-
view by the Genera _ l Assembly. Mr.
Comay had done the same thing..
The -Arab ploy has not paid off.
Mr. Thant replied in effect:
"Thank you; not now—if ever." He
said in his letter declining the in-
vitation that the assembly had not
asked him to go to the Middle East.
Of course that's true. But it is also
true that the secretary-general
needs no such specific request if he
chooses to go. He has made many
trips around the world without be-
ing requested or instructed to do
so by any UN organ. His predeces-
sor, the late Dag Hammarskjold,
went to the Middle East many
times without specific authoriza-
tion. But Mr. Thant -has evidently

-

felt that he does not care to
choose such a course at this time.

The Arabs here were very un-
happy.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

10—Friday, April 29, 1966

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