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April 22, 1966 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Israel Is Facing Massive Absorption Job—Fisher

Open 1st Jewish School
Since War in Germany

Israel faces a massive task in the
next few years to absorb 200,000
newcomers from distressed areas,
with many welfare and health
needs. Their needs as well as all
services overseas are undergoing
vital changes.
This is revealed by Max M.
Fisher of Detroit,
general chairman
of the United
Jewish Appeal
and vice-president
of the Council of
Jewish Feder a-
tions and Welfare
Funds, in a report
published by the
CJFWF this week.
Likewise in-
Fisher eluded in the re-
port, which can be obtained from
the CJFWF, 729 7th Ave., New
York, are comments by Dr. Astorre
Mayer of Milan, chairman of the
Standing Conference of Jewish Com-
munity Services in Europe; Claude
Selman, secretary general of the
Federation of Jewish Societies of
France; and Joseph Nahmias,
prominent French Jewish leader.
Irving Kane of Cleveland, a past
president of the CJFWF and chair-
man of the CJFWF Overseas Serv-
ices Committee, introduces the

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)
FRANKFURT—The first Jewish
school to open in Germany since
World War II began lessons Tues-
day for first-grade students and
10 second graders.

volume.

North American and world Jew-
ry, Mr. Fisher said, are faced with
massive and difficult philanthropic
responsibilities:
Continued immigration from
Israel and other Western coun-
trie
Some 400,000 Jews in need in
Europe and Moslem countries.
Bringing Jews to self-support
in their new countries of settle-
ment.
In France, Fisher noted, the Jew-
ish community has not yet over-
come many of the needs of hun-
dreds of thousands of Jewish refu
gees from North Africa.
Twenty years after the end of
World War II, Fisher pointed out,
overseas programs are vastly dif-

f erent,

and are continuing to
change.
"After 20 years, it hardly could
be expected—in fact it would be
tragic—if we found ourselves doing
just the same things and meeting
just the same needs as when we
began. Yet the one great constant
in our work is rescue immigration.
We err still in the business of sav-
ing as many ayes as possible," he
s
Not only will there be a con-
tinued movement to Israel and
other countries, but Jewish im-
migration to the United States
also is expected to rise under the
new U.S. immigration law, the
Detroit communal leader
stated.
The United Hias ServiCe, he said,
likely will be called on to handle
an annual average immigration to
"western areas of about 12,000 per-
sons per year."
Since 1948, North American Jews
have helped bring 600,000 from
backward, primitive Moslem lands
to Israel, he noted. We expected
them to adjust quickly to the 20th
Century. But they brought with
them great handicaps — "unseen
walls which have kept them from
being absorbed quickly and easily,"
the Detroit leader said.
In the newly-established develop-
ment towns populated primarily by
immigrants, 30 per cent are illiter-
ate in any language. Twenty per
cent are non-productive families—
people on permanent relief or em-
ployed full-time or part time in
public works. Sixty per cent consist
of families of six or more persons,
against Israel's national average of
3.7 persons a family.
The average wage earner in Is-
rael earns $205 a month. In the de-
velopment towns, the average is
scarcely $100 monthly.
Fisher noted a CJFWF study
group report that there are more
than 200,000 people getting welfare
and public works assistance in Is-
rael. The CJFWF report adds,
"Until we bring these people as

far as possible to self-support, our
job is not done."
In the past 20 years, American
Jews have raised a total of $2.6
billion in Federation and welfare
fund campaigns. The overseas part
of this achievement represents a
"remarkable, creative relationship
between our community federa-
tions and welfare funds on one
hand, and the United Jewish Ap-
peal on the other," Fisher said.
"The UJA is not something apart
from the communities. It is an ex-
pression of the communities. And
its overseas achievements are corn-.
munity achievements, as well,"
But the job is unfinished—both
here and overseas. Local needs
don't have to give way to overseas
needs, Fisher emphasized. "I be-
lieve, too, that strong, local Jewish
communities are necessary to have
a true understanding of our over-
seas problems, and strong support
for them.
"Whatever strengthens our Jew-
isliness, strengthens our Jewish
communities, and at the same time
our interest in Jewish problems.
Therefore, I believe that local Jew-
ish educational programs, Talmud
Tombs, community centers, old
age homes, and similar institutions
are necessary to a total JeWish

"It follows then, that I believe
we must have responsible support
F or both our local activities and our
cverseas work. The operative word
tie Nvcrd 'responsib;c."
We are a "Chosen Generation,"
Fisher declared. We have seen the
lowest point in Jewish history in 20
Centuries. We have seen the great-
est revival of the Jewish people in
history. "And we helped, and must
continue to help to make that re-
vival possible."

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, April 22, 1966-15

A RENDEZVOUS WITH BISTORY

'Eke etoidlt crlationat gund o c4merica


Fisher Receives National Award

cordially invitee you

to participate in the

:or the

ng

--
otudy middion, contiocation
and the dedication of the

N

'Monday, Duty gourtkcilineteengeundred and Sixty-Six

••••;K::

In recognition of his philanthropic activities, in behalf of Israel
and world Jewry, as well as his labors in behalf of Jewish religious
and cultural movements, Max M. Fisher of Detroit, national chair-
man of the United Jewish Appeal, was honored at the annual award
dinner of the Reform Jewish Appeal at Americana Hotel, New York,
Sunday night. The award to Fisher is shown being held by Rabbi
Herbert Friedman, UJA executive vice-chairman (left) and Lester
Avner, dinner chairman (right) Fisher's UJA leadership, his labors
In behalf of Detroit's Allied Jewish Campaign, his countrywide
tours in behalf of UJA in the past 18 months, have won for him
the admiration of co-workers in scores of American conununities.
Mayor John V. Lindsay of New York and Sammy Davis Jr. were
the other recipients of Reform Judaism awards at Sunday's dinner.



In his address responding to the
award presented to him, at last
Sunday's dinner in New York,
Max M. Fisher cited the vast
scope of American philanthropy
and said it reflects "the persistent
and deep-running force of a power-
ful religious heritage springing
from Judaism to Christianity to
the American people. "To be
worthy of these heritages," he em-
phasized, it is necessary "to sup-

port religiously-inspired efforts to
relieve human suffering and ad-
vance human welfare."
The Detroit leader also pointed
out that it is significant that
"about half of all the funds con-
tributed to philanthropy are given
for religious or related purposes,"
and the reason for it, he said, is
that "in our American democracy
we maintain a traditional separa-
tion between Church and State."

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