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April 08, 1966 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ecology—Science Outlined for Youth

Jewish Welfare Board at Work

Fascinating Studies of Organisms,
Environment by 2 Qualified Authors

Ecology — study of home, of the striving for perfection, the
organisms and environment, of survival of the fittest.
animals and the earth — specially
The field and the wilderness,
geared for children — emerges in the wild life, the grass and the
two noted books as a fascinating animals—all are detailed for an
understanding of the ecological
set of textbooks for youth.
.Both evaluate the subject. Both studies, and the emergence of
treat ecology as a science which man in command gives ecology
proves a must for boys and girls in its proper place in human rela-
their early youth, with meritorious tions and values.
"Learn and live," Hirsch ad-
aspects in both books for adults
vises, and he quotes Francis
as well.
Bacon: "We cannot command na-
*
*
*
Ecology is the study of organ- ture except by obeying her." He
completes by emphasizing that
isms and their environment. In there is
"no place like oikos" and
"Experiences With Living Things states:
— An Introduction to Ecology for
"Man has shown great skill both
the Five-to-Eight-Year-Old," pub- in adjusting to changes in his
lished by Beacon Press, Katherine environment and in creating new
Wensberg explains: "It is a Greek conditions in which he can live.j
word meaning 'study of the home,' In fact, he has made himself at i
used scientifically to identify the home in some of the most im-1
study of plants and animals in probable places. He can survive
relation to their environment."
in long periods in the deep seas,
This at once indicates the in the frigid Antarctic, in alti-
significance of this most infor- tudes high above the earth. He
mative book, its approach to the is venturing into new space en-
organisms and living things in our vironments . . .
midst.
But as we face the exciting
A consultant in the field of pros-pects of this last third of the
nursery school education, author 20th Century, many of the old
of previous works related to her problems remain. The Greek word
present subject, Mrs. Wensberg oikos embraced the idea of the
writes with such authority, with entire world as man's home. And
such marked ability to reach the there is no escape form the house-
young child and to instruct the keeping duties on earth. 'What is
youngest reader, that her book the use of a house,' Thoreau
emerges as a most valuable asset asked, 200 years ago, 'if you haven't
got a tolerable planet to put it
in the instruction of children.
The vastness of the subjects on?'
"As we explore a new world, we
relates to the cat and to bees, to
trees and grass, robins, earth- are obliged to keep this old one 7 Youths Sentenced
worms, woodpeckers, spider s, livable. Man is superbly fitted for
moles, ants, caterpillers, grass- the earth. It is up to him to keep for Attack on 2 Boys
it a fit place in which to live."
LONDON (JTA)—Seven youths
hoppers, crickets.
S. Carl Hirsch's first, science were sentenced to a detention cen-
Simplicity marked by accuracy,
reaching out to the child with an book for young people, "The ter last weekend for periods up
understanding and a direct offer Globe For The Space Age," won to six months for participating in
of knowledge that will fascinate the Thomas Alva Edison Award an attack several months ago on
the young readers, insure Mrs. for the Best Science Book for two Jewish youths, one of whom
Wensberg's book will prove a great Children published in 1963. Two was seriously wounded with a
asset in homes and in schools, as later books, "This Is Automation" knife. They were found guilty after
a textbook and as a guide to and "FoUrscore .. And More: The a trial in the Central Criminal
Life Span of Man," also reflects Court here.
parents in introducing their chil- his intense interest in the prob-
Two other youths were placed
dren to ecology.
lems of our age.
on probation for two years, one
"If our children seek to under-
Hirsch was born in Chicago, and was remanded in custory for a
stand life in all its forms, the he and his wife now reside in medical report, and two were
Source of life and the source of Evanston, Ill. He is a map lith- acquitted. The Jewish youth who
love (which seems to accompany ographer, and occasionally finds was stabbed was Joseph Springer,
the passing on of life in its highest time for his favorite hobby — son of a leader of the British
Agu-
forms), their quest for the truth cabinet making. dath Israel Organization.
about the ultimate mysteries may
be even more rewarding than our
own ," Mrs. Wensberg states.
Her book has an interesting and
valuable appendix with listings
of specific plant and animal life
Major Vidkun Abraham Lauritz
events that had transpired and
especially evident during all Jonsson Quisling, the Norwegian
as part of the library on Nazism
months of . the year. It is a Nazi who aided Hitler and the
they will provide much data in
suggested order for use of the Nazis, and whose name became a
research on the story of Hitler-
stories in her .book. And there symbol of derision and contempt,
ism which is yet to be recorded
also is an appended "Desert and the chief of the German High
in its entirety.
Adaptation of the Materials" by Command, Wilhelm Keitel, were
Keitel's memoirs were edited,
Margaret Gooding.
condemned to die for their crimes. with an introduction, by Walter
* * *
Keitel, who was indicted at Gorlitz and were translated by
Equally important is "The Liv- N uremberg,
David Irving. There are maps to
ing Community — A Venture Into asked for a fir
illustrate
the general's activities
Ecology," by S. Carl Hirsch, splen- ing squad, but he
and Girlitz's chapter, The Indict-
didly illustrated by William Stein- was hanged with
ment," is an illuminating account
el, published by Viking Press.
Alfred Jodi Oct.
of the trial and of Keitel's atti-
The two works are complemen- 16, 1946.
tudes.
tary. Studied together they pro-
0n 0 ct . 2 4 ,
It is in the latter that reference
vide such a vast amount of knowl- 1 9 4 5 , Quisling,
is made to the singling out of
edge that they will serve an ex-
condemned
"communists, Jew and intellec-
cellent joint purpose and will
tuals among Soviet prisoners for
enrich the youngsters' information to death by a
Norwegian court,
'special treatment,' •in other words,
about a vital science. •
for liquidation."
Commencing his story with an wasshot by a fir-
Quisling
Of interest in "Quisling" is that
account of Henry David Thoreau's ing squad.
Their stories are told in two vol- when he was sentenced to die he
taking "to the woods," describing
Thoreau's genius "in seeing life tunes that serve as supplementary had left his Bible open with this
whole," illustrating Charles Dar- material about the last war — text underlined: "He shall redeem
win's naturalism, Hirsch enters "Quisling — P r o p h e t Without their soul from defeat and violence
into a lively discussion of ecology. Honor" by Ralph Hewins, pub- and precious shall their blood be
"The name 'ecology,' " he ex- lished by John Day (200 Madison, in His sight." The criminals still
plains, "was formed about a hun- N.Y.), and "The Memoirs of Field- held on to the Bible!
dred years ago out of the Greek Marshal Keitel, Chief of the Ger-
The two volumes will serve as
word oikos, which means 'home.' man High Command, 1938-1945," addenda in the study of the hor-
Ecology is the study of the home published by Stein and Day (7 E. rible crimes. Both Hitler agents-
life of living things, how they re- 48th, N.Y. 17).
Keitel, with all his objections to
Neither of the books mentions
late to one another and to their
the SS which do not convince the
Dachau or Auschwitz or the
non-living environment. The ecol-
reader—sought glory for the Nazi
atrocities against the Jews, but army—and Quisling who perpetu-
ogist works in the laboratory. But
their stories reveal the crimes.
he can probably be found most
ated a name equivalent for treach-
Keitel's adds data about the ery became anathema. On the
often in the field . . ."
Nazis. He had apparently had an
From this point on he pro-
bookshelf reserved for Nazi ex-
aversion for the SS (Schutzstaf- poses, the two books will a d d
ceeds to explore beings and to
feln), but his crimes were un- evidence to indictments for inhu-
show how "beings need beings,"
mistakable. Similarly, Quisling's manities.
how neither animals nor plants

The American Jewish
military community of
Korea is busily involv-
ed with religious,
moral and social ac.
tivities, as shown by
t h es e . photographic
"reports" received by
the . National. Jewish
Welfare Bord Commis-
sion on Jewish Chap-
laincy. Chaplain Sey-
mour Moskowitz, senior
Jewish. chaplain. of
Headquarters I Corps,
Ouijongbu (top) checks
to see that two young
members of the Jewish
congregation of Seoul
have properly placed
the tephillin on their
arms and heads. Chap-
lain Moskowitz (center)
conducts . a . character
guidance instruction
class. for. Korean
soldiers. An informal
get-together (bottom) is
held in the Jewish
Chapel Center of Harry
Katzman, associate
USO director in Seoul;
Seoul Jewish Chaplain
Saul Parker; Mrs. Katz-
man, volunteer c o o k
and baker for the Jew-
ish Chapel Center; and
Chaplain Moskowitz
with Karma Katzman
on his shoulders.

"could survive without the
others." He writes about repro-
duction, the turning of the worm,

role is on record. Both received
their just due. Their life stories
throw light on many of the

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

24—Friday, April 8, 1966

Yavneh Chapter of Detroit, the
Religious Jewish Students Associa-
tion, will hold a Pesach party 8:45
p.m. Saturday, with roller skating
at Arena Skate Club, followed by
a movie and refreshments at the
home of Marilyn Sitron, 17521
Roselawn. For information, call
Marlene Cern of the Wayne State
group, 341-9850.

If you have TB, most of your
treatment may take place at home,
but it probably should begin in a
hospital where up-to-date medical,
nursing and surgical care is avail-
able.



Larry Freedman

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Quisling and Keitel - Two Hitlerites
Who Were Executed for Their Crimes



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