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January 28, 1966 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

truth and justice have been
mocked in the past few years. But
without truth and justice, we are
lost."

U.S. Aid Held Up to Warn Israel?

Fear of N-Buildup Cited as Reason;
1ban, on Visit to D. C., Denies Pressure

WASHINGTON (JTA) — Indica-
tions mounted here that the State
Department is deferring action on
pending Israeli applications for
loans to initiate the $200,000,000
nuclear desalination project and
other assistance, to help induce Is-
rael to desist from development
of nuclear weapons in the coun-
try.
Toreign Minister Abba Eban
who leaves Israel today for a visit
to Washington, London and Paris,
said Tuesday that such "rumors"
have "no foundation." He said Is-
raeli-United States talks continued
as planned in a friendly atmos-
phere, adding that "some of the
differences of opinion between us
and Washington stem from the
fact that they want to see us as a
developed and not an underdevel-
oped country. Our attitude to this
Is mixed—on the one hand, it is a
compliment and on the other we
cannot accept this attitude.")
(Eban said he planned to discuss
with officials in the three capitals
the extent to which the world
-3owers could use their influence
:o end Arab hostility toward Is-
rael.
(He stated that his talks would
include the question of arms reach-
ing the Middle East. Adding that
his talks would not be devoted en-
tirely to the arms question, he ex-
plained that most arms reaching
the Arabs were not coming from
Western powers and also that "Is-
rael has not been idle. Although
we have a definite concern about
any stimulation of the arms race,
it would be unwise to translate
that concern as weakness." He
stressed that "if the arms race
as to go on we are not going to
lose it."
We stressed that the rise of
Middle East Arab regimes op-
posed to President Nasser of
Egypt was "more of a challenge
than a threat to Israel's secur-
ity." He said that this develop-
ment showed that the idea of a
pan-Arab Middle East would not
materialize.)
Reference has been made to
State Department pressure at dis-
cussions am o n g U.S. officials
mindful of the forthcoming re-
sumption of international talks at
Geneva, aimed at preventing nu-
clear proliferation.
Thought has been given to Is-
raeli nuclear potentialities, con-

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ceptions of international inspec-
tion, and ideas of coaxing Israel to
cooperate with promises of aid on
nuclear desalination and other
benefits.
The State Department has sug-
gested notions of persuading Israel
to cooperate by deferring action
not only on nuclear desalination
but also on pending development
loan applications and by specifying
less liberal terms and amounts of
surplus commodity sales.
The department probably would
not openly admit such pressure
and might employ the pretext of
cutting expenditures because of
the Vietnam war.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
Tuesday informed the House
Foreign Affairs Committee, in
testimony before the body, that
he was personally preoccupied
with Vietnam and unprepared to
comment on recent arms deci-
sions affecting the Middle East
but that a department spokes-
man would soon appear before
the Committee's Near Eastern
subcommittee to explain devel-
opments.
Rusk had been asked by Rep.
Leonard Farbstein, New York
Democrat and Foreign Affairs
Committee member, to provide in-
formation on the shipment of arms
by America to Jordan and Saudi
Arabia at a time when the Soviet
Union is supplying bargain-rate
weapons to Egypt, Syria, and Iraq.
Rep. Farbstein indicated concern
about the security of Israel.
Suggestions for inspection by
the International Atomic Energy
Agency and other moves to inhibit
and restrict nations with civilian
nuclear capabilities from develop-
ing nuclear military potentialities
have been advanced by William C.
Foster, U.S. delegate to the Geneva
disarmament conference, which re-
sumed Thursday, and by members
of the Atomic Energy Commission
and Joint Congressional Commit-
tee on Atomic Energy. Several
days ago, a Senate resolution on
non-proliferation was offered by
Sen. John 0. Pastore, Rhode Is-
land Democrat, and obtained co-
sponsorship of 51 other Senators.
Sen. Hugh Scott, Pennsylvania
Republican, Monday urged Pres-
ident Johnson to provide Israel
with American defensive arms
and voiced concern "that, while
our attention is focused on Viet-
nam. we may lose sight of other
explosive trouble spots which
threaten world peace."
In a letter to the President, Sen.
Scott said American claims that
this nation is not a major or trad-
itional source of arms for the Mid-
dle East lost validity when the
huge transactions with Jordan and
Saudi Arabia were revealed.
He asked the President to au-
thorize Israel to buy necessary de-
fensive arms from U.S. suppliers.
"If peace is to be preserved in the
Middle East," he wrote to Mr.
Johnson, "Israel must have arms
to defend her security and deter
attack by Arab states which have
threatened to drive her into the
sea."
The Senator noted that, shortly
after the United States resumed
aid to Egypt, it was reported that
the Soviet Union sold Egypt a
squadron of Soviet, all-weather
MIG-21D jet fighters and Sokhoi-9
interceptors. He drew the Presi-

.

dent's attention to the fact that an
official Egyptian spokesman
"boasted of Egypt's ability to play
both ends."
The spokesman said "the Soviet
Union assisted Egypt's defense and
development, while the need for
food is met substantially through
cooperation of the United States."
(In New Delhi, political sources
reported that Tunisian President
Habib Bourguiba has been
sounding out the posibilities of
convening an Arab-Israel con-
ference along the lines of the
Tashkent cease - fire agreement
between India and Pakistan.
(The reports were linked to a
meeting between Mongi Slim, as
personal representative of Presi-
dent Bourguiba, with the new
prime minister of India, Mrs. In-
dira Ghandi, and with other In-
dian officials, including the for-
eign minister. Slim reportedly
conveyed to the Indian leaders
President Bourguiba's congratula-
tions on the Soviet - sponsored
Tashkent agreement.
(Slim has already visited Pakis-
tan and is proceeding to Iran on
the same mission. The sources said
that, if the Tashkent agreement
were successfully implemented,
possibilities existed that India, to-
gether with other Asian and Afri-
can countries, would make an ap-
peal for similar talks between the
Arab countries and Israel.
(The Tunisian weekly "Jeune
Afrique" devotes four whole pages
to the "Fertile coexistence" be-
tween Jews and Mosleihs down the
ages. It said in an editorial com-
ment: "Past history may perhaps
help clarify the yet rarely per-
ceptible future.")
The new chief of Israel's
foreign ministry, Eban, at
a luncheon held in his honor by
the Foreign Press Association,
expressed the belie f that the
principles of the Tashkent accord
between India and Pakistan can
be applied to the situation existing
between Israel and the Arab states.
"The next four years," he said,
"will be crucial in determining
whether the Arabs come to the
realization that Israel is here to
stay." He expressed belief that the
stand taken by Tunisia's President
Habib Bourguiba, who has called
for peace talks between Israel and
the Arab states, "is the first indica-
tion of a feeling that will spread
among the Arabs." Eban also
voiced the hope that there may
develop better relations between
India and Israel.
The Moscow correspondent of
Kol Haam, the Israeli Commu-
nist daily, reported that Soviet
sources had emphasized to him
that the Soviet Union believes
all conflicts between states
should be solved by peaceful
means, and that this included
"the Israeli-Arab conflict."
Correspondent Mordecai Kaspi
reported that the issue arose in
connection with the Tri-Contin-
ental Solidarity Conference in
Havana last week, which adopted
a resolution condemning the Zion-
ist movement and the existence of
Israel "in the occupied part of
Palestine?'
The resolution said Palestinian
Arabs had the "right to liberate
their country" and called for the
severance of "all political rela-
tions with Israel, its economic and
cultural institutions and its expul-
sion from international organiza-
tions."
The resolution also warned Afri-

can and Asian nations against
"Israeli technical and financial
aid," which was termed "a new
disguise of United States imper-
ialism and neo-colonialism."

The correspondent said that
"Soviet personalities" h a d in-
formed him that the Soviet dele-
gation to the Havana conference
did not vote for the anti-Israel re-
solution.
He quoted these sources as
pointing out that the Soviet Un-
ion had diplomatic relations with
Israel, that Israel had been estab-
lished following , a decision by the
United Nations, of which it was a
member and that Israel was an in-
dependent state.
David Ben-Gurion, the former
premier who broke away from
the dominant Mapai Party last
• year and formed his own Rafi,
the Israel Workers List, for the
last general elections, accused
the present Israel government
Sunday night of "grave irrespon-
sibility in handling the nation's
security in a way that could
bring disaster w i thin four
years."
Addressing a meeting of the
Rafi council, top ruling body of
his dissident group, Ben-Gurion
charged: "The army is now being
used for party interests. Decisions
taken lack all sense of national
security. Grave things are being
done, but I cannot speak about
them."
Ben-Gurion accused Prime Min-
ister Levi Eshkol of "having a
genius for changing facts and al-
tering history." He illustrated that
charge by quoting from Eshkol's
statement to the Knesset (Parlia-
ment), in which the Premier had
said "not everything was in order
during my predecessor's rule."
"I realize," said Ben-Gurion, "that

An attack against the Mapat
Party was made at the same meet-
ing by Shimon Peres, one of Ben-
Gurion's principal backers, who
had resigned his office as deputy
minister of defense last summer
to join the Rafi leadership. "Mapai
minus Ben-Gurion," said Peres,
"is a minus,"
The Rafi Council adopted by ac-
clamation a demand on the gov-
ernment to hold the next, annual
Independence Day parade in Jeru-

salem.

Mark Farband Anniversary

TEL AVIV (JTA)—More than
500 members of the Farband Syr
kin Club, who had settled in Israel,
celebrated here Monday night the
60th anniversary of the founding
of the Poalei Zion and the Fara-
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