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January 14, 1966 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Mouth-Long Festival '66 to Bring
Drama, Dance, Art, to Center;
Sculptor Lipchitz Honorary Head

Arts Festival chairman at the
Center, is serving as general
chairman.
Highlighting the entire festival
program will be a major art ex-
hibition at the Center. In • addi-
tion to various statuary pieces,
oils, water colors and other paint-
ings by noted artists gathered
from important galleries through-
out Michigan, will be several
pieces • on loan to the Center from
outstanding museums across the
country.
A gouache by Marc Chagall
valued at $13,000, entitled "Com-
position with Bouquet," will be in
the exhibit on loan from the Flint
Institute of Arts. Of special int-
erest will be a sculpture by Lip-
chitz. Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority of
Wayne State University will pre-
sent photographs and exhibits on
American art in the Center Lobby
throughout the Festival.
New York choreographer
Sophie Maslow, the Center's
dance artist in residence during
January, will culminate her stay

Ceremonies at the Jewish Cen-
ter Jan. 26 will mark the opening
of Festival '66, a cultural program
which is the first of the Center's
40th anniversary special programs.
The schedule of events ending
March 1 includes dance concerts,
symphony concerts, various thea-
ter groups and theatrical produc-
tions, a film festival, lecturers and
a month-long art exhibit and sale.
The festival's opening program
at 8 p.m. will feature Roger
Stevens, special assistant on the
arts to President Johnson; Dr.
William Rea Keast, president of
Wayne State University; and
Karl Haas, chairman of the
Michigan Council on the Arts,
representing Gov. George Rom-
ney. Each will discuss the role
of the arts in their respective
fields. Formal opening of the
Festival '66 art exhibit and a
social hour will follow.
Honorary chairman of Festival
'66 is the internationally noted scu-
lptor, Jacques Lipchitz. Lester S.
Burton, last year's winter Cultural

Try and Stop Me

By BENNETT CERF

M

AURICE SAMUEL'S "The World of Sholom Aleichem"
is chock-full of quotable excerpts from the great Yid-
dish humorist's stories. There is the one benighted charac-
ter who wears spectacles
without lenses because
"it's better than nothing."
His curse for enemies is
"May you crawl up per-
pendicular walls" and his
parting words of cheer to
friends is always "May
your detractors shrivel."
There is another charac-
ter who reasons, "God
hates a poor man. The
proof is that if He didn't,
He wouldn't make him
poor." And there's the
passenger on a crowded
street car who tell off the
conductor asking for his ticket, "So, I haven't got one. So,
what of it? Do you expect me to walk? Or maybe you want
me to rob somebody just to please you?" The conductor
knows when he's licked. He moves on without another word.

*

*

*

C

HARLIE LEDERER, accustomed to zany antics by his
literary pals, was taken aback, nevertheless, when he
received this official announcement in the mail recently*
The National Park Com-
missioner is pleased to
announce that your back
yard has been selected
for a game preserve. The
first shipment of 500 buf-
falo and 200 yaks will ar-
rive at your home Tues-
day at 4:30 a.m."
*
*
*
In the middle of the
Negev Desert, in a dilapi-
dated shack, dwelled a holy
man bent with age, pitifully

emaciated, but with eyes
still filled with hope and
defiance. "How can you
survive in. this miserable
place all by yourself ?" an American tourist asked him. The holy
man replied slowly, "It's a lucky thing for me that my religion
demands that I fast four days a week. Otherwise, I'd starve to
death!"

*
*

*
*

*
*

"My husband:" complained Mrs. Waxelbaum, "is so careless he
can't even keep the buttons on his coat."
"Maybe," hazarded her friend, Mrs. Heimerdinger, "the but-
tons aren't sewn on tight enough."
"You're absolutely right," agreed Mrs. Waxelbaum. "His sew-
ing is cne of the things he's most careless with!"

*

*

*

The head bartender at the Hemisphere Club whips up a mar-
tini so dry he uses no vermouth whatever. He just stands for
thirty seconds facing France.
*
*

OVERHEARD:

(By Nancy Gruber) One tiger meeting another on Madison
Avenue: "Where on earth have you been? You reek of gasoline!"
Wise mother to her children cooped up in the house: "Go out
into the sunlight, my dears. Beautiful weather lost is never
found again!"
Shapely lass seeking secretarial post: "I don't type very fast—
but I can erase fifty words a minute."
© 1966, by Bennett Cerf. Distributed by King Features Syndicate

with the opening dance program
of Festival '66, "The Village I
Knew," a panorama of the shtetl,
8 p.m. Jan. 29, and 10:15 a.m.
Jan. 30.
The morning matinee will fea-
ture the Center's Young Dancers
Guild, under the direction of Mrs.
Harriet Berg, in a program of con-
temporary Israeli dances.
Center folk dance instructors,
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Kaplan, will join
the Young Dancers Guild in an In-
ternational Folk Dance a Long 8
p.m. Feb. 17. Folk dance instruc-
tion and audience participation
will follow the formal presenta-
tion.
Center dance coordinator Mrs.
Berg will again be in the spotlight
at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 22, when she will
narrate a program of three films
on the modern dance.
A Family Concert featuring
four top teen-age soloists from
the area will open the music
program 2:30 p.m. Jan. 30.
Performing with the Center
Symphony Orchestra, under the
direction of Julius Chajes, will be
pianist Gordon Goodman, violin-
ists Sheila Fiekewsky and Ida Kav-
ajian, and cellist Robert Stulberg.
The Center Symphony Orchestra
will again perform in a concert of
Jewish music March 1.
"Gems of Our Tradition," a cant-
orial concert featuring 15 cantors
from the greater Detroit area, will
be presented 8 p.m. Jan. 30. Spon-
sored by the Cantors-Ministers As-
sociation of Detroit, the ensemble
singing will be conducted by Israel
Fuchs of Cong. Beth Abraham.
The Kenneth Jewell Chorale will
perform Bloch's Sacred Service 8
p.m. Feb. 5. Cantorial soloist for
the evening will be baritone Cantor
Ramon Gilbert,' native Detroiter
now associated with the Village
Temple in New York City.
A panel discussion by four ex-
perts, "Is There 'Jewish' Music?"
will follow the musical portion of
the program.
A special Omnibus program for
children will be performed 2
and 3:30 p.m. Feb. 6. The child-
ren's opera presentation of "A
Tale of Helm" will be presented
by the Piccolo Opera Co.
A Yiddish Theater production
will be seen 8 p.m. Feb. 1 and 2,
and at a matinee Feb. 2. Featur-
ed will be Yiddish performers
Joseph Buloff, Miriam Kressyn
and Seymour Rexsite.
Samuel Becket's "Waiting for
Godot" will be the festival dra-
matic production 8:30 p.m. Feb.
9 and 10. The play is directed by
Stephen Wyman of the University
of Michigan's professional theater
program.
The Center Theater's special
dramatic offering will be Henrik
Ibsen's "Enemy of the People"
8:30 p.m. Feb. 19, 20, 22, 23, 26
and 27. Robert McKee, managing
director of Center Theater, will
direct.
On Feb. 6, 13 and 27, a film festi-
val will be presented.

-

-

Miriam Schapiro's Works
on Exhibit at Siden's

Paintings, collages and prints
by Miriam Schapiro are presented
in a one-man show at the Frank-
lin Siden Gallery.
Miss Schapiro was born in
Toronto, in 1923. She is married
to the artist Paul Brach and
divides her time between New
York City and East Hampton,
Long Island. Her paintings have
appeared in such important exhi-
bitions as New Directions in Amer-
ican Painting. While on tour,
this exhibition appeared at the
Detroit Institute of Arts. She was
also represented in a 10 - man
exhibit organized by museum di-
rector Alan Solomon.
The Miriam Schapiro exhibi-
tion will remain at the Siden
Gallery until Jan. 31.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
24—Friday, January 14, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz Observe Anniversary

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schwartz of Isadore (Shirley) Robbins and Sey-
Tyler Ave. will celebrate their mour (Anna) Schwartz. They have
golden wedding anniversary at a seven grandchildren.
dinner for family and close friends
at Oak Manor Caterers Sunday.
Bread won by fraud tastes sweet
to a man;
But afterward his mouth will be
filled with gravel.
— Proverbs

"Pleasing You
Since. 1927"

111

MR. AND MRS. SCHWARTZ

Married in New York City Jan.
20, 1916, the couple has lived in
Detroit since that time. Mr.
Schwartz has been in the fruit
business for many years.
Their children are Messrs. and
Mesdames Benjamin (Sylvia) Stein-
berg; Joseph (Florence) Gorelick,

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