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January 07, 1966 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tel Aviv's Bialik Awards Go to Author and Scholar
Political Instability
Berkowitz, who 'won a previous
TEL AVIV (JTA) — The 33rd
Blamed for Threats
annual Bialik Prizes totaling $1,- Bialik Prize, received the current
to S. American Jewry 334 of the Tel Aviv Municipality award for his recently published

Steinmetz's Life Story Heads Youth
List of Biographical Works for 1965

Charles Proteus Steinmetz was
a dwarf. He was physically de-
formed from birth. But he was
one of the giants of our time, one
of the great electrical wizards of
all time.
The story of his life is told
in a fascinating book, "Steinmez:
Wizard of Light," by Anne Welsh
Guy, published by Knopf. • This
book surely tops the biographical
books for children published in
1965.
It is regrettable that the Jewish
background of the genius was not
traced. Perhaps there was little
if anything to account for about
the Jewish . interests of the Stein-
metz family. The electrical wi-
zard's life story, however, is nar-
rated here with skill, certain to
hold the attention of the young
readers who will be thrilled with
an account about a great man
who began life under difficult
0.bsta cies..
As a child—the boy with an
ugly hump—Karl already was ex-
perimenting, building a temple,
making a , water wheel. He had
troubles in school, could not mas-
ter the multiplication table. Yet,
he was later to develop mathe-
matical laws that revolutionized
the field of electricity.

He became the major guide
in the development of electrical
science at General Electric and
the world acknowledged him
as the most brilliant mind in his
field.

he helped solve a part of the
baffling riddle of electricity ...
He taught the world how to
harness, control and increase
electrical power . . . To Stein-
metz must go the credit for
the use of every machine that
operates on alternating power!"

"All of us can be grateful to
the "little dwarf with the giant
mind," Guy appropriately con-
cludes her story.
The illustrations by Leonard
Rosoman add immeasurably to the
value of this splendid biography.

* * *
Story About a Negro Girl
in an Integrated School

NEW YORK—Political instabili-
ty—not anti-Semitism — poses the
major threat to Jewish life in South
America, it was reported by the
leader of an American Jewish Con-
gress study mission that returned
earlier this month from Argentina,
Brazil, Chile, Peru and Venezuela.
Will Maslow, executive director
of the congress and spokesman
for the delegation, presented the
group's findings at a news con-
ference in Stephen Wise Con-
gress House here.
In his report, Maslow said the
study group was encouraged to
find the activities of existing anti-
Semitic organizations in South
America were sporadic - and their
influence generally negligible.
He warned, however, that "per
vasive political discontent through-
out the continent, aggravated by
acute poverty, could develop in-
to violent social upheavel,•gravely
affecting not only local Jewish
communities but every segment of
society."
A particularly acute problem
facing South American Jewry, he
said, was the "alienation from
Jewish life of tens of thousands
of young men and women — a
whole new generation that is
drifting away from the Jewish
community."

$850

No one undersells

HARRY ABRAM

A Phone Call Will SAVE You Money!

SHORE CHEVROLET CO.

Res. LI 8-4119

12240 Jos. Campau

TW 1-0600

From Knopf come other valu-
able children's books that have
special merit at .this time.
Especially noteworthy is the
story about a Negro girl in an
integrated school. "Patricia Cros-
ses Town" by Betty Baum, well
illustrated by Nancy Grossman,
takes the Negro child across town
for the first time on a regular bus.
There are new faces — white
faces—and 12-year-old Pat Mar-
ley finds faces new experiences.
Whatever Your Auto
There is one child who has to over-
come a mother's prejudices.
Needs You'll Be Glad You
There's another that befriends her.
Brought It to .. .
Oh, there are difficulties and
complications and Pat learns a
lot about all kinds of people. But Boston Industrialist
in the end she finds friends, President of NAACP
likes the school she is in, be-
NEW YORK — Continuing its
comes a part of a truly American policy of electing whites to the
setting in which bias has no place. highest post of the National Asso-
In the current struggle for an ciation for the Advancement of
14321 W. 8 MILE RD.
integrated American life, stories Colored People, the organization's
like Betty Baum's are timely, ap- 60-member board elected retired
UN 4-9821
propriate and necessary.
Boston industrialist Kivie Kaplan,
Equally timely is the story
61, as president.
• ROAD SERVICE
The presidency is largely a cere-
of 10 Negro civil rights leaders
• MINOR REPAIRS AND
monial job, more closely connected
who are described by Emma
with fund-raising than with policy.
Gelders Sterne in "I have a
TUNE-UPS
Kaplan, former president and
Dream." This fine Knopf series
• BRAKE WORK
general manager of the Colonial
of biographical sketches is well
Tanning
Co.,
was
elected
to
the
illustrated by Tracy Sugarman.
• ACCESSORIES
Taking the title for this col- NAACP board of directors in 1953.
lection of biographical sketches Forty-five of his relatives are life-
time members of the NAACP.
from Martin Luther King's Wash-
ington speech of Aug. 28, 1963, THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Mrs. Sterne deals in her excel- 14—Friday, January 7, 1966
lent descriptions with Marian An-
derson, Asa Philip Randolph, II SUS. SU
U. II SOSO 1111( I II )11111111111
Hugh Mulzac, Thurgood Marshall,
Rosa Lee Parks, Daisey Bates, OE
James Farmer, Fred Shuttleworth,
John Lewis. Her concluding chap-
Enjoy this DELUXE CLEANING at POPULAR PRICES ;
ter, "One Day Out of a Long To-
morrow," is an over-all tribute to
Negro libertarians, especially to
Dr. King.

-

CHARLIE
ROBINSON
Is Back !

,

In 1901, when he was 36, al-
ready having made America hi.9
home, Steinmetz became world
famous through his Law of Alter-
nating Current. Mrs. Guy points
out that although he had never
received a college degree, Har-
vard University, in 1902, confer-
red upon him an Honorary Master
of Arts Degree as "the foremost
electrical engineer in the United
States and therefore the world."
Union College of Schenectady
gave him a Doctor of Science De-
gree, and invited him to be pro-
fessor of electrical engineering
and head of that department. He
became president of the Schenec-
tady Board of Education.
There was a gathering of the
great of his time. Einstein, Edi-
son and Marconi were there, at
his summer camp in Mohawk Val-
ley. "With Einstein, he talkte d
mathematics by the hour. With
Marconi, he discussed radio waves
and transformers. But he could
not talk with his good friend
Edison, who was very deaf. So, Other Knopf Youth Books
to Edison's delight, he tapped his
Other children's books issued
knee in Morse Code. Steinmetz by Knopf have a variety of ap-
had studied the code to please a peals.
grandson."
Phyllis R. Fenner selected 11
In the final years of his life,
he kept inventing. In 1921 he "fast-paced tales for young sports
experimented with artificial light- fans" for her basketball stories
transformers, transmission wires contained in "Quick Pivot." Ath-
which could be made lightning letically-minded, lovers of good
stories with lots of action will be
proof.
enthused by these tales.
"Without Steinmetz," his bio-
There are two new Knopf books
grapher states in this interest-
for the very young. In "Tom and
ing book, "electricity would be
the Small Ant," by Leonore Klein,,
far less useful than it is. Through
illustrated by Harriett Sherman,
his law of Alternating Current,
the young reader will find some-
thing to be puzzled by and later
1966 HOLIDAY SPRING
to be thrilled with. As the sub-
TOURS TO SUNNY
title to the book indicates, in this
story "the difference in size . be-
tween a boy and an ant is vividly
shown." It provides adventure and
thrill. The story will delight the
(Many With Steopovers in Europe)
very young, will give the elder
who reads it to the young who
Featuring:
are yet to learn reading an oppor-
CHOICE OF 20 EL-AL
tunity to narrate a good story
JET TOURS AND CRUISES FOR
dramatically.
• PURIM
• PASSOVER
Then there is a music book.
• YOM HAATZMAUT
"Copelia: The Girl with Enamel
All inclusive from
Eyes," contains themes from
also
music by Leo Delibes. It was a-
100 GROUP FLIGHTS
$535
(from 2-12 weeks)
dapted and illustrated by Warren
only
Chappell. It is based on the famous
For further information and
ballet about a lifelike doll. The
FREE BROCHURE contact:
story and the musical score assist
in the revival of the tale about
HISTADRUT TOURS
Copelia and the cunning doctor
(Specializing in Israel Travel
once again comes to life.A famous
for Every Member of the Family)
story is introduced for music-
loving children. It is a most de- ,
19161 SCHAEFER
lightful book—for children of all
UN 4-7094
ages.

Israel

were awarded to Yitzhak Berko- "Chapters of Childhood." Ratznavi,
witz, a veteran Hebrew and Yid- who is instructor in Judeo-Arabic
dish author, and Yehuda Ratznavi, literature at Bar Ilan and Tel Aviv
a scholar of medieval Jewish universities, will receive the Bialik
Judaica award.
literature on Sunday.

Charlie Robinson's
SHELL STATION

HAVE YOU SEEN CHARLIE!

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