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December 24, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-12-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

When Lights Go On for Israel's Blind

Once a year the lights go on for Israel's blind—at the Hanukah
celebration at the famous Jewish Institute for the Blind in Jeru-
salem, the pioneering center supported by Keren-Or, Inc., 1133
Broadway, New York. This picture shows the children of the institute
lighting the first candle.

Study to Determine Effects of Funeral
on Emotional Adjustment of Bereaved

MIAMI BEACH — The Jewish
Funeral Directors of America an-
nounced plans last week to conduct
a nationwide survey to determine
the effects of funeral practices
on the emotional adjustment of
bereaved families.
Burton L. Hirsch of Pittsburgh,
JFDA president, who announced
details of the project at the or-
ganization's 38th annual conven-
tion at the Fontainebleau Hotel
here, said that the survey would
be conducted by a team of psy-
chologists with the cooperation of
member funeral establishments in
communities throughout the United
States and Canada.
In carrying out the project,
Hirsch said that the information
would be gathered from families
at various periods following a fu-
neral to determine the immediate
and long-range effects of the rites,

`Midstream' as Monthly
to Be Issued in January

NEW YORK (JTA)—The first
issue of Midstream as a monthly
Jewish review will be issued here
in January, it was announced by
Dr. Emanuel Neumann, chairman
of the Herzl Foundation, pub-
lishers of the magazine.
Formerly a quarterly, Midstream
will continue to be edited by
Shlomo Katz. Its editorial board,
in addition to Dr. Neumann, is
composed of Dr. Marie Syrkin,
associate chairman, Rabbi Arthur
Hertzberg, Maurice Samuel and
David Sidorsky. Milton R. Konvitz
and Ben Halpern serve as contri-
buting editors.

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for Every Member of the Family)

19161 SCHAEFER

ceremonies and funeral practices
in satisfying the emotional needs
of the survivors.
Citing the importance of de-
termining to what extent various
funeral ceremonies help per-
sons cope with the crises of grief
and bereavement, Hirsch said
that poorly managed grief "is
known to be a factor in the de-
velopment of emotional disturb-
ance and physical ailments."
These factors, he noted, explain
the growing interest in grief
and mourning on the part of
Psychiatrists, psychologists, so-
ciologists and clergymen.
The need to assure "the mean-
ingful role of the funeral as a
religious event," was stressed in
an address at the convention by
Dr. Samson R. Weiss, executive
vice president of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations of
America.
Asserting that both the re-
ligious leader and the funeral
director have key functions in ful-
filling the spiritual need of the
bereaved family, Dr. Weiss said
that Jewish funeral practices must
reflect "the proud spiritual her-
itage of a people which has held
fast to its faith and practices
through millenia of adversity and
persecution."
Edward T. Newman of Miami
Beach, who was elected to succeed
Hirsch as JFDA
president for the
coming year,
sharply criticized
what he termed
"the unfortunate
American t e n -
dency to mock
death and burial
practices."
Newman cited
"recent film and
television pres-
entations as well
as. the appear-
ance of certain
parlor games for
children in which Newman
death and bereavement are de-
picted in a comic fashion with
emphasis on mawkish and dis-
tasteful humor." He deplored the
"vulgar and cheap manner in
which producers, entertainers and
toy manufacturers exploit the cur_
rent fad of spoofing about death:"
Newman noted that psychologists
stress the importance of present-
ing death in a natural and realistic
manner to children and he said
that it was "regrettable" that the
subject is often treated in a dis-
torted manner.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
6 Friday, December 24, 1965

UN 4-7094



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„, •

• •

248 in Detroit Tourist Group Arrive in Israel
for Visit; 2 Plane-Loads Include 45 Children

Elliott Elkin is accompanying the
tour and specialized guides will as-
sist in taking the group in special
buses to the most
important Israeli
areas.
The tourists
will visit the
1 Technion h e r e,
the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jeru-
salem, and in
Haifa the major
sights to be seen
include the Bahai
Center, the Haifa Elkin
Participants in the tour include Bay and Zebulun Valley and the
several families from other cities. famous Acre area.
Among them are Dr. Harold S.
Motorcades will take the visitors
Sahm, • formerly of Detroit, and to Nazareth and to other major
Mrs. Sahm, of Staten Island, N.Y.; points of interest. --
Florence and Harriet Ebstrup,
While in Israel, Detroiters will
Lenore Entine, Mrs. Joseph Epp-
stein, Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Klein, participate in the dedication of the
Mrs. A. Mindel, Mr. and Mrs. Saul Leon Kay Komisaruk Chemical
Simons, all of Toledo, and Rabbi Laboratory, established by the Zion-
and Mrs Dov. D. Pinkelny, ist Organization of Detroit, at Kfar
Silver.
Akron, 0.
An especially noteworthy por-
IF YOU TURN THE
tion of the trip is the program
planned for the children and
teenagers who are part of this
UPSIDE DOWN YOU %voter
tour. It is expected that the
Jewish National Fund will ar-
FIND A FINER WINE THAN
range a tree-planting session and
the youths will be introduced to
t h e outstanding accomplish-
ments in Israel's land-reclama-
NEW YORK (JTA)—An effort tion activities.
Milan Wineries, Detroit, Mich-
to raise $2,500,000 in the United
States for the establishment of the
Moshe Sharett Institute of Educa-
tional Sciences was announced by
Daniel G. Ross, chairman of the
board of American Friends of Tel
Aviv University.
Named in memory of Israel's
former prime minister and for-
eign Minister, Moshe Sharett, who
died last July, the Institute is de-
signed to raise Israel's educatiOnal
A Phone Call Will SAVE You Money!
standards. It will supply the coun-
try's growing need for highly
trained teachers, principals, dis-
TW 1-0600
12240 Jos. Comm
trict superintendents, administra-
Res. Li 8 4119
tors, school psychologists and
otherspecialists.
"Plans for the school were first
We Are Pleased to Announce That
proposed and approved by Sharett
almost a year ago when the Uni-
versity awarded him its first Hon-
orary Doctorate," Ross stated. "In
view of Mr. Sharett's role in help-
Marking the Establishment of
ing to found Tel Aviv University
and his appreciation of the impor-
tance of higher education in his
country's continuing development,
he was gratified with the plan to
(A new city in Israel being named in honor of Mr. and Mrs.
build the Institute in his name.
To implement the plan, the $2,-
Julius Rotenberg) located at Kiryat Lublin., near Haifa
500,000 fund-raising campaign has
Will Take Place
been launched to -erect a modest
functional building, to recruit the
Saturday, February 12, 1966
required faculty members, to
grant advance study scholarships
at the Statler Hotel
and to establish funds for the
teaching and reserach staff."

Special to The Jewish News
HAIFA, Israel—Two planeloads
of Detroiters, numbering 248, in-
cluding 45 children aged 5 to 16,
arrived here Thursday, by arrange-
ment with the Elkin Travel Bu-
reau, for a 10-day tour of Israel.
The two Air France planes ar-
rived two hours apart, and the
tourists were taken at once to the
Dan Carmel Hotel here for a brief
rest and then to proceed to see
the country.
This is believed to be the first
time that so large a number of
children participated in a tour of
the Jewish State and as part of
so many tourists in a single group.
The youngest of the children,
James L. G-lossman, 5, is with his
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Gloss-
man. In this family group also are
the Glossman's two other children,
Robert, 11, and Diane ,9.
There is one 7-year-old, Denise
Rycus, who is with her parents,
Mr. and Mns. Rycus, and sister.
Sheryl, 10.
Three others are age 8, three
are age 9 and the others are aged
10 and older.
The children, in addition to those
listed above, are: Terry Abrams;

Bernard and An dr e a Edelson;
Diane, Jahanne and Helen Etkin;
Beth Ann and Carol Fishman;
Lawrence Garvin; Gary, Susan and
Allan Goodman; Julie Grant; Marci
and Vicki Heller; Eric and Stephen
Cohen; Lori Karbal; Laya, Deborah
and Naomi Klein; Mark and Karen
Meltzer; Robert and Roxane Nus-
holz; Jeffrey and C i n d y Obron;
Bruce and Frederick Ravid of Chi-
cago, Ill.; Nancy and James Robins;
Ilene Rosin; Susan and Albert
Sarko; Randy Slomovitz; G a y le
Subelsky; Dean Weber; Sherrie
Weitzman and Carol Zide.

Tel Aviv U. Asks
Fund of $2,500,000

No one undersells

HARRY ABRAM.

SHORE CHEVROLET CO.

-

naugurat Ceremonies

*'



W ar ,Rotenher

Guest Speaker:

Nuclear Medicine Parley
Conducted in Tel Aviv

HON,

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire

to The Jewish News)
TEL AVIV — Benefits to medi-
cine developing from the applica-
tion of nuclear energy were
stressed at a two-day Second Na-
tional Congress of Nuclear Medi-
cine here this week.
The report on the medical phase
was presented by Prof. E. D. Berg-
man, chairman of Israel's Atomic
Energy Commission, which togeth-
er with the Israel Medical Associa-
tion and the Tel Aviv University
Medical School, is sponsoring the
event.
Prof. Andrew de Vries of the
medical school said that more than
10 students were now attending the
school. More than 75 papers were
scheduled for presentation com-
pared with 17 at the first congress
five years ago.

JAMES ROOSEVELT

United States Ambassador to
the United Nations Education,
Science and Culture Organiza-
tion (UNESCO).

COCKTAIL HOUR 9:00 P.M.
AMBASSADOR'S RECEPTION 10:00 P.M.
BUFFET SUPPER 11:00 P.M.

Contribution: $25.00 Per Person

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