100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 24, 1965 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-12-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THERE'S A DEER, DAD. I'M
GLAD YOU WEREN'T DRIVING
FAST, YOU MIGHT HAVE
HIT HIM I

OH BOY!
WE'LL SEE
SOME DEER IN
THE KEWEENANJ
PENINSULA!

YES;TOMMY, I'M ALWAYS
PREPARED TO STOP OR
TAKE EVASIVE ACTION
WHEN DRIVNG
WOODED AREAS.

Russ Aide Gives Medals
to Israeli Shlomo Rigler,
World War II Veteran

NO,TOMMY, BUT IT WAS
BUILT IN 1844 10 PROTECT
THE COPPER MINERS FROM
THE 11.01AMS.

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

David Felix Claims Sacco, Vanzetti Were Guilty; Repudiates Intellectuals

David Felix, one-time foreign
correspondent, former U. S. gov-
ernment information officer in
Vienna, became interested in the
Sacco-Vanzetti case when he be-
came aware of the reactions in in-
tellectual circles in Europe and
the organized appeals that likened
the two Italian anarchists who
were executed on a robbery and
murder charge in Massachusetts,
to Alfred Dreyfus.
He has made a deep study of the
case and in "Protest: Sacco-Van-
zetti and the Intellectuals," pub-
lished by Indiana University Press,
Bloomington, Ind., he contends that
the two men actually were guilty.
Felix goes into many details
of the case and he evaluates the
views of Felix Frankfurter and
the many intellectuals who with
him pleaded in the two an-
archists' defense, as well as
those who sided with the pros-
ecution. He refers to the refusal
of Supreme Court Justice Louis
D. Brandeis and Oliver Wendell
Holmes, as well as Chief Justice
Howard Taft, to touch the case,
and he defends the judge, Web-
ster Thayer, against the charges
hurled at him.
Felix points out that the clear-
est and most widely heard news-
paper voice "during the last des-
perate summer of Sacco and Van-
zetti" was that of Walter Lipp-
mann in his editorials in the N. Y.
World, but that there was "a less
solemn note" in the columns of
Heywood Broun who is accused of
having "worked up a satisfactory
amount of hate" with his attacks
on the judge and on President
Lowell of Harvard whom he de-
scribed as throwing on the switch
on the prisoners. The World, ac-
cording to Felix, "finding that an
intellectual's catharsis of this ex-
treme nature was harming the

1-

1

rz-

)

cause, felt obliged to stop his col-
umns."
Felix deals with the role of
Frankfurter by stating that he had
written a good brief in the prison-
ers' defense, but he insists that he
had an inaccurate impression, that
his legal brief anticipated "the ex-
aggerations of opposing counsel by
his own one-sided arguments." He
is quick to add: "If we refuse to
accept the Frankfurter arguments
as the most impartial available,
this need not affect our commend-
ing him for the generosity of heart
and the great ability he contrib-
uted to a cause he found just."
But Felix also defends A. Law-
rence Lowell who was Harvard
president at the time and who sup-
ported the prosecution. Recogniz-
ing Lowell's blunder in opposing
Brandeis for the Supreme Court,
he nevertheless mentions some
liberal acts in commendation of
Lowell. (Lowell was known as a
vile anti-Semite).
Supreme Court Justice
Holmes' correspondence with
Prof. Harold Laski, who pleaded
for Sacco and Vanzetti, is espe-
cially referred to in support of
the claim that the two men were
not guiltless. Holmes had writ-
ten: "A thousand-fold worse
cases of Negroes come up from
time to time, but the world does
not worry over them . . . I see
no adequate available reasons
for the world outside the United
States taking up the matter and
I think your public and literary
men had better have kept their
gentle mouths shut . . . "
Alfred Dreyfus, the victim of the
anti-Semitic case in France, who
was vacationing in Normandy, ac-
cording to Felix "was persuaded
to violate his old refusal to express
an opinion. Betrayed by his fellow

Try and Stop Me


By BENNETT CERF
DICK FRIEDMAN, in his newly published "U.N. Wit and

It Humor," tells about a testy meeting of the Security
Council in the early 1950's when a British delegate, wearied
by all the arguments,
suddenly interrupted with
d ot' 16 LIVE
c oeERs!
"My government wttild
EN GLfte
propose a short recess at
0
which it would be most
happy to serve as host
for a small libation—per-
haps a whisky and soda."
The Russian representa-
tive was on his feet in no
time flat, announcing
happily, "The delegation
from the U.S.R.R. will
not abstain."
* * *

When the daffy Dodgers
Were bivouacked at Ebbets 12 29
Field in Brooklyn, they had
on their roster one outfielder who sported a flowing beard and
mustache till heartless manager Casey Stengel (then a kid of 55
or so) made him shave them off. The outfielder's name was
Bordagary, nick-named Frenchy, and his work in the outfield
often left something to be desired. One day the Dodgers were
nursing a 2 to 1 lead with only the ninth inning to go. The
Dodger pitcher retired the first two opposing hitters, then induced
the third to lift an easy fly to Bordagary's territory. Frenchy
muffed it a horrendous three-base error. Then the next hitter
lined one over Frenchy's head—but after a desperate run, he
caught the ball in his gloved hand, and held on to it when he
crashed into the fence. The crowd gave him a great hand as
he headed for the clubhouse. Frenchy explained, "That muff
fooled 'em. I gave 'em the old decoy—and they fell for it." For
once, even Stengel was speechless.

-



Ci 1965, by Bennett Cert. Distributed by Xing Features Syndicate •

officers, he had never denied his
old corps nor his own conservative
views. Previously he had refused
to support the Sacco-Vanzetti de-
fense. Now, on the basis of his
own experience, he was willing to
move thus far: 'When doubt exists,
it is fighting providence to commit
the irreparable.' "
After emphasizing that he be-
lieves in the guilt of Sacco and
Vanzetti, Felix states that "the
Sacco-Vanzetti legend has been
enormously valuable as a vehicle
of protest and an inspiration to
the intellectuals." He adds that
"we have learned to qualify many
of our absolutes" and he likens

TEL ° AVIV—Soviet Ambassa-
dor Dimitri Chuvakhin pinned two
medals for valor on Shlomo Rigler
of Natanya, a World War II vet-
eran of the Red Army, in the first
such award to former Soviet citi-
zens in Israel. The presentation
was held at the Soviet Embassy
in Ramat Gan. Previous awardees
had to go to Moscow to receive
their decorations.
Rigler was a private in a tank
unit which fought in General Zhu-
kov's forces from Auschwitz to
Breslau. He joined the Red Army
after it liberated Breslau, later
settling in Israel.

other issues to those of the Sacco-
Vanzetti case, asserting:
"About other issues, however,
we are not obliged to reject the
values of militancy and uncom-
promising action. The civil rights
struggle will need its heroes and
martyrs. Perhaps we should be-
lieve them absolutely, at least
until that battle is won. After-
ward, we can try to understand
with the help of irony."
Especially in view of the latter
note of tolerance, it will be inter-
esting to know whether there will
be repudiation of David Felix's
claims and to watch out for them.

Hollywood Notes . . .
Director Sydney Pollack current-
ly is in Louisiana to prepare, to-
gether with John Houseman, prod-
uction of "This Property Is Con-
demned." The picture, based on a
one-act play by Tennessee Wil-
liams, is being produced under the
banner of Ray Stark's Seven Arts,
with Natalie Wood and Robeit
Redford in the leading roles.
Clive Revill, who portrayed
Fagan in the musical "Oliver,"
makes his U.S. screen debut in
Jerome Hellman's production of
"A Fine Madness," co-starring with
Joanne Woodward-Newman, Sean
P. S. Connery and Jean Seberg under
Irvin Kershner's director. Filming
of the Warner epic, from the El-
liott Baker novel, starts late in
September in New York City.
actions and the punishment of evil
actions; and finally He gives the
history of those who lived on
earth before us—the salvation of
Leave Everything to Us
those who have been virtuous and
the punishment of those who have
been wicked. The divine Book
therefore contains the three princi-
pal forms of education . .
But know furthermore, you who
read this, that despite its inestim-
able worth, despite its high place,
and despite the beauty of its lan-
guage, which light up the darkness
and the mystery of its contests,
the servants of God would do
wrong to believe that outside of
the Bible there is nothing which
would compel men to believe in
the Eternal. Indeed, they are in
WYN and HAROLD LANDIS
duty bound to know that many
other proofs exist.



Three Kinds of Education

By SAADIA BEN JOSEPH
(892-942)
From "Jewish Anthology" by
Edmond Fleg, translated by
Maurice Samuel — a selection
from the preface to Saadia's
"Commentary on the Pent-
ateuch."
There are three kinds of educa-
tion, of which one is the most
potent. The first and weakest con-
sists in saying to the one to be
educated: "Do this: do not do
that," without making him under-
stand the consequences of the com-
mand or the prohibition, whether
he obey or refuse to obey.
The second kind consists in giv-
ing, together with the command or
prohibition, the consequences of
of the path chosen. Thus: "Do this,
and you will be rewarded: do not
do that, or you will be punished."
This method is better than the
former, for it awakens the idea of
happiness or of misery resulting
from the path of conduct chosen
by the individual.
The third kind of education,
while it consists in giving command
and prohibition, and in indicating
the recompense or punishment that
will follow, adds thereto the his-
tory of those people who have
obeyed and were rewarded by
salvation, and of those people who
disobeyed and were punished by
misery. This method is more ef-
fective than the other two, since
it adds as it were the test and
experience to the commands, and,
to point the lesson, adduces the
value of personal testimony.
Now God has revealed all three
methods in the Bible, which is a
book dedicated primarily to the
education of His servants. He com-
mands piety and prohibits sin; He
announces the reward of good

Marriages, Divorces in Israel
During 1964, 19,197 marriages

were solemnized in the country.
But there were also 2,222 divorces.
Of this number of divorces only
88 were among Moslems, 19 among
Druzes and only one among
Christians. The tendency to di-
vorce in Israel is highest during
the first and second years of mar-
riage; the number of divorces
drops as the years go by, but then

suddenly increases in the eighth
year. Upwards of half the divorces

take place among childless couples;

only about 25 per cent have one
child, and 13 per cent have two
or more children.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, December 24, 1965-29

I I WHY WORRY I I

HOME CATERING

Music the Stein-Way

DICK STEIN

& ORCHESTRA

LI 7-2770

Phone EL 6-8411
• STYLE
• ELEGANCE



BEAUTY

WYN-HAROLD CATERING

Photographers — Specializing in
Color Candids and Movies

LI 8-1116
LI 8-2266

PARTY FLOWER SPECIALISTS

Having A Party?

SOMETHING WONDERFUL HAPPENS WHEN
YOU SEE CEIL AND BEN FOR THAT
SPECIAL OCCASION !

We provide the ultimate in personalized service with
something different . . . something special . . and
something beautiful in flower arrangements for all your
simchas.

WEDDINGS • SHOWERS • TEAS

LUNCHEONS • BAR MITZVAHS • BAS MITZVAHS

CONFIRMATIONS • SWEET SIXTEENS • BANQUETS

FOR APPOINTMENT, CALL 345-4383

0watt:ow& hi.

Party Flower Specialists

15212 W. SEVEN MILE ROAD

Between Sussex and Whitcomb

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan