100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 17, 1965 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JDC Adopts a Budget of 830,425,000


Ribicoff Pays Visit to Kennedy Monument in
Israel

As a highlight of his trip to
Israel in November, Senator Abra-
ham Ribicoff of Connecticut paid
a visit to the
John F. Kennedy
Monument, now
being built by
the JNF near
Jerusalem. T h e
Senator was ac-
companied by his
wife and both of
them planted
trees in the forest
near the memor-
ial.

7

Edward M. M. Warburg (left) retiring chairman of the Joint
Distribution Committee, congratulates his successor, Louis Broido,
who was elected chairman at the 51st annual meeting of the JDC
in New York. Broido is commissioner of the Department of
Commerce and Industrial Development of New York City. Several
- — hundred Jewish leaders at the meeting adopted a budget of
$30,425,000 to finance JDC operations on behalf of more than 400,000
needy Jews in 30 countries around the world. The budget was
presented to the national conference of the United Jewish Appeal
which convened immediately after the JDC meeting. JDC receives
its funds mainly from the campaigns of the UJA.

Bourguiba Clarifies ME Peace Plea:
Israel Must Return Some Arab Land

LONDON ( JTA) — Tunisia's
President Habib Bourguiba, who
proposed last spring that Israel
and the Arab states start negotiat-
ing about peace, made it clear in
an interview published here Tues-
day that his plan envisaged that
"a portion of Israeli territory must
be returned to the Arabs."

Scholarship Winners
Greet the Rohliks,
Donors of WSU Grant

Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Rohlik
had a pre-holiday luncheon party
at the McGregor Center at Wayne
State University, and everybody
came.
In this instance; everybody in-
eluded the newly-appointed vice
president for student affairs, James
P. McCormick, in his first official
appearance, and 18 entering fresh-
men, the Rohlik Scholars; who are
studying at the university this fall
on scholarships made possible by a
$10,000 grant to the Wayne State
•ind from the Sigmund and Sophie
')hlik Foundation.
This contribution, the first of 10
ich annual installments that will
total $10,000, was delivered to the
university last March 23 on the
occasion of Rohlik's 75th birthday,
but this was his and Mrs. Rohlik's
first opportunity to meet with the
recipients of their generosity.
Rohlik, 17301 Mark Twain, is the
president of Rohlik, Inc., a leather
goods plant, at 7777 Cortland.
Harold Cruger, director of fi-
nancial aids, whose office selected
the Rohlik Scholars, spoke about

the value of student aid funds at
the University.

Paul E. Andrews, associate di-
rector of the Wayne State Fund,
explained that the Rohliks had
come to Detroit from Magdeburg,
Germany in 1938. He said also that
Rohlik had tried unsuccessfully to
retire a few years ago from his
highly successful business of manu-
facturing specialty leather goods.
However, the new owners returned
Rohlik, Inc. to him after a year
and now "he'll probably never re-

tire."

Deaths caused by birth defects
each year cost the U. S. an esti-
mated $80 billion in future pro-
ductivity. Of the babies born alive,
one in 40 does not live to see his
first birthday. A total of 105,000
infants under one year of age
die annually. Birth defects are a
leading cause of these deaths. You
can combat this toll by joining
the March of Dimes.

The interview appeared in the
quarterly Views, together with
answers by Abba Eban, deputy
prime minister of Israel, to Presi-
dent Bourguiba's statement.
Referring to Arab-Israeli rela-
tions, Bourguiba said; "I thought
it would be better to find a suitable
platform which would attract world
sympathy and international opinion
and which would be an improve-
ment compared to the present situ-
ation the Arabs are in.
"This could lead to a reasonable
and lasting solution, the construc-
tion of peace between the countries
in the area. I advocated a return
to United Nations legality, respect
for UN decisions," he said.
"There is a portion of Israeli ter-
ritory which must be returned to
the Arabs. I know that Israel
would not accept this easily, but it
was still worth suggesting," he de-
clared.

Asked whether he thought it
would be possible in the future
to negotiate with the Israelis
without preconditions, he said:
"I would rather not fight with
people who are obstinate. I
would rather look after my own
country. My proposals had been
made to ensure at least a mini-
mum of peaceful coexistance be-
tween existing elements. The
policy of hatred and bitterness
has achieved nothing in 17
years."

Eban, in answer to questions
about Israel's reaction to the Bour-
guiba proposals, said: "Nothing
could be more uncongenial to the
success of the Bourguiba initiative
than expressions of public embrace
from Israel. Our reply was that we
were prepared to negotiate with
any Arab state on any question.
What we cannot accept is that we
must make prime concessions in
order to win their arrival at the
conference table."
Regarding the Arab refugee
question, Eban stated: "The moral
consideration must impel us only
to adopt those solutions which
make for the peace of the Middle
East and the welfare of the refu-
gees, and forbids us to compound
the sufferings of the past by creat-
ing new tensions for the future.
"I don't believe that any state-
ment by Israel about her willing-
ness to take back a fraction of the
refugees would advance peace by
a single step. Rtit, if the Arab
states were to say we are prepared
for an international solution of the
refugee problem in which every-
body must play his p a r t, I am
sure there would be a definition
of an Israeli contribution."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, December 17, 1965-11

The Senator showed keen in-
terest in the project, and when the
architect explained that the memor-
ial structure was shaped like the
trunk of a tall tree cut down be-
fore its time, and that it would be
built of 51 columns, representing
the States of the Union, including
the District of Columbia — the
Senator nodded appreciatively and
said, "I must say, your Israel ar-
chitects show considerable im-
agination."
In conversation with the JNF
people on the spot, Senator Ribi-
coff told them that they were
doing very important work. "I my-
self, as a member of the Noar
Hazioni, used to go out collecting
with a blue box," he said, and
added, "The Jewish National Fund
is the source of my own attachment
to Israel and every time I come
here I marvel at your achieve.
ments; which are noticeable every-
where . . ."
There were no speeches or cere-
monials, and in the calm of the
setting sun in the Judean hills,
Senator and Mrs. Ribicoff each put
a sapling into the ground and
covered it with earth. Mrs. Ribicoff
recalled that the late President
was a great lover of trees and
flowers, and had designed a rose
garden near the White House, the

first of whose blossoms he had En Yahav, Gerofit, Yotvata, Blot
not lived to see. "It seems right and Eilat in the south.
then," she added, "to plant a tree
A 14-kilometer access road to
in his memory, here, in this land- the Yatir development region has
scape."
just been completed and will en-
The Kennedy Monument and able the afforestation and land
Peace Forest are special projects reclamation crews of the JNF to
of the JNF of America and will enlarge the scope of their develop-
be inaugurated the coming summer. ment work in this hilly area.
On Dec. 9, 1965, another outpost
was added to the border settle-
ments in the desert rift valley
of the Arava, along the Negev
PERSONALLY ESCORTED BY
frontier between Israel and Jordan.
JULES DONESON
A Nahal unit (Pioneer Settler
Corps of the Israeli Army) will
$
occupy the site, three kilometers
EVERYTHING
south of the well-known oasis of
Leaving Feb. 20
En Husub. Thus, a vital link will
RESERVATIONS: CALL
be created between Sedom and
BR
2-2400 or DI 1-7111
Neot Ha-Kikar in the north, and

ISRAEL

569

OPEN SUNDAYS 10 A.M.-4 P.M.

And Every Eve. 'Til 8:30 to Christmas

FEATURING ALMOST EVERYTHING IN WEARING APPAREL FOR

REGULAR, BIG and TALL Men

"Use Your Security Charge Accounts"

15360 LIVERNOIS

UN 2-2104

(NEAR FENKELL)



SHOP AT BORENSTEIN'S

BAGEL
& LOX SET



Reg. $8.00

WHILE SUPPLY LASTS

ELECTRIC MENORAH

ONLY $1

• 98

WE HAVE THE MOST COMPLETE SELECTION OF:






MENORAHS • CANDLES • DREIDELS • GIFT
DECORATIONS
• GREETING CARDS
WRAP
RECORDS
• BOOKS for Children and Adults
COMPLETE TABLE SETTINGS — Table Covers, Plates,
Napkins in Matching Design
• MOBILES • HANUKAH CHOCOLATE 'GELT' COINS

HANUKAH SPECIALS

3 VOLUME SET

9x12, 128 PAGES

"PORTRAIT OF A PEOPLE" "THE BOOK OF HANUKAH"

BY CHARLES RADDOCK

Reg.
$22.50

Only 1

75

A Wonderful Hanukah Gift!

Including 28 pages of full color,
full page illustrations
BY SIEGMUND FORST

$ R 6e.g.0 Only $300

BORENSTEIN'S BOOK and MUSIC STORE

Serving Detroit and Suburbia

13535 W. 7 MILE at Schaefer

DI 1 - 0569 or DI 1 3268

OPEN SATURDAY NIGHT AND ALL DAY SUNDAY

-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan