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October 29, 1965 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Blanche Parent Wise in Running
for Detroit Common Council Seat

Blanche Parent Wise, candidate
for Detroit Common Council where
she served with distinction for
eight years, slated this week for
television and radio broadcasts and
appearances at various organiza-
tions, released her usual blunt
and forthright replies to queries
about her stand on the issues.
Mrs. Wise views the function of
city government, particularly the
Common Council, as the duty to
provide citizens with the things
that they cannot provide them-
selves—water, sewers, highways,
roads, police protection and other
services.
City government is big business
— $370 million a year business
with 49 departments. It requires
a councilman's constant attention
every work day of the week to re-
view the actions, the budgets, the
appropriations and disbursal of
funds of the 49 departments.
It is highly important that coun-
cil members have business experi-
ence. It is no place for theorists
who expound utopian theories but
lack the essential practical outlook
on municipal problems. Mrs. Wise
points out that she is the only
council candidate with a successful

business background.
The experienced and knowledge-
able Mrs. Wise takes a long, cold
look at the relations between city
and county governments in one in-
terview this week. During her pre-
vious tenure she was the first wom-
an to be elected chairman of the
county board of supervisors in the
then 123-year-old history of that
body.
Detroit councilmen are manditor-
ily members of the board. Mrs.
Wise declares that the 118-member
board is a most unwieldy body with
three auditors and no head of gov-
ernment. It has no office where
the sign reads "The buck stops
here."
The next council, Blanche Parent
Wise says, must do away with this
headless government and install re-
sponsible officials because Detroit
citizens supply 62 cents out of ev-
ery dollar spent at the county level.
City Councilmen are members of
the county supervisors board. They,
with their appointments are a very
integral part, in fact a major part
of the board of supervisors in
Wayne County. They must exercise
the leadership so badly needed.
If elected, Mrs. Wise promises to
make this one of her prime objec-
tives.

Ravitz Receives
Highest Ratings

Enthusiastic support to Mel
Ravitz in his bid for a second four-
year term on Detroit's Common
Council is evidenced in many quar-
ters.
Ravitz seeks re-election in the
all-important balloting on Tuesday.
•-743/4
The young Fr•
Councilman has r
won the support
of numerous
civic, religious,
nationality,
nei g h b er hood,
block, education-
al, labor and pro-
fessional organi-
zations. Civic
Searchlight rates
him "preferred
and well quali-
fied".
"Ravitz,
No.
36 on next Tues-
day's ballot, is
well - known to
thousands of
Detroiters a n d
Ravitz
is recognized as a champion of the
ordinary citizen, whose needs he
seeks to represent in resolving the
complex problems of life in the
huge Detroit metropolis," his
friends remind the voters.



WISE VOTERS CHOOSE
EXPERIENCE

VOTE FOR
JUDGE HARRY J.

DINGEMAN

JR. FOR

CIRCUIT COURT
JUDGE









Judge of Common Pleas Court
of Detroit since 1947.
"Preferred and Well Qualified"
Civic Searchlight.
Endorsed by Detroit News and
Detroit Free Press.
Recommended for election by
Detroit Bar Association.

NO. 11 ON THE BALLOT

VOTE NOV. 2

Ed Connor Points to 17-Year Record
Vaughn Urges
Councilman Edward Connor, can- months ago, which extended the
hours and days when the fares
Voters to Avoid didate for reelection for his sev- were
in operation.
term, is basing his campaign
Another program which Council-
Confusing Issues enth
on programs which he has intro-

Jackie Vaughn III, candidate
for the Common Council, made a
strong appeal to the general com-
munity, especially to the non-
Negroes, to reject impugning of
character and to
•, • .•
avoid being con-
fused by public-
ity which has
muddled the posi
tions of many
candidates.
He appealed
for appreciation
of "t h e basic
facts" involving
"t h e beautiful
plans for the
future of De-
troit." He asked
some pertinent
questions, s t a t-
Vaughn
ing:
"What kind of government are
we getting when alongside new
expressways, we have infected
housing? When alongside a vital
rebirth in downtown office build-
ings, we have a Receiving Hospital
pest house? What kind of city is
this where basic housing and
sanitation laws are not enforced?
Where a council is so split — be-
tween die-hard extremists and
progressives — that even the
simplest of legislative matters be-
come entangled in personalities
and vendettas?"
"I seek to serve in a responsible
position," said Vaughn, "that will
help develop our community while
keeping in mind the needs of today
as well as hopes of tomorrow. We
need enforcement of basic hous-
ing and building codes; a better
Receiving Hospital; solutions to
juvenile delinquency; more plan-
ning for the needs of Senior citi-
zens; prosecution of an aggressive
Urban Renewal program — but
one that realizes the needs of peo-
ple displaced by Urban Renewal,
and need to rekindle old fashioned
respect for law and order.
"And, I say as a Negro and a
citizen, that the Negro community
has not a right, but responsibility
to offer our talented men and
women to serve on Common Coun-
cil and in other levels of our city
government. I am tired of hearing
the phrase, 'they deserve repre-
sentation.' No one deserves repre-
sentation; you earn it and — when
you are as large a percentage
of the population as is the Negro
group, with the young aggressive
talent we now produce, you must
share the burden of government
which represents trial and sacrifice
as well as prestige and authority."

VOII ■ IMWO

ELECT

A Man of Courage

JACKIE
VAUGHN

for your

COUNCILMAN

Ballot No. 40

• Graduate Oxford University, Oxford, England, with distinction.
Fulbright Scholar and Fellow.

• Past President State Young Democrats of Michigan, two terms.
• Wayne State University Instructor (Social Science) 1960-61.

• Presently serving as a Consultant.



For a united, progressive Detroit.

• Improve city's neighborhood conservation program.

• Specific tax relief for small businessmen.
• Improvement and expansion of library and recreational
facilities.

40 >E< ELECT JACKIE VAUGHN

le

40

Miriani Given
Wide Support

Many leading citizens joined this
week in an appeal for a high rating
for former Mayor Louis C. Miriani,
at the polls on
Tuesday, in his
race for the Com-
mon Council.
"His exper
ence encourages
the largest possi-
ble vote of confi-
dence for this
able administra-
tor," Esther Git-
lin said this
Miriani week, speaking
for a large group of his supporters.
The list of Miriani's backers kept
growing since his splendid showing
at the primaries.

16th Century Dramatist
Solomon Usque, a 16th century
poet and merchant, was the first
Jewish dramatist since the second
century before the Common Era.
He was the author of Esther, the
first Jewish drama in the Spanish
language.

32—Friday, October 29, 1965
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

duced and actively supported for
the past 17 years.
Rated preferred and well quali-
fied by Civic Searchlight and en-
dorsed by 36 groups, Connor points
to a number of achievements, such
as reduced DSR bus fares for sen-
ior citizens ten years ago and an
updating of the ordinance two

man Connor introduced locally to
initiate government action against
water pollution was the forerunner
of national legislation which Presi-
dent Johnson signed into law
earlier this month.
A native of Chicago, Connor is
a law graduate from Notre Dame
University, married and the father
of two sons and a daughter.

ELECT
BLAIR MOODY Jr.

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE

• Trial lawyer over
13 years

• Graduate U. of M.
Law School

• Rated "Preferred
and Well-Qualified"
by Civic Searchlight

• Chairman, Wayne
County Citizens for
Kennedy-Johnson,
1960

• Endorsed by Detroit
Bar Association

HERE ARE SOME OF THE PEOPLE
WHO SUPPORT BLAIR MOODY, JR.
FOR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE
























Congressman John D. Dingell, Jr.
• Robert Nederlander
Irwin I. Cohn
• Stephen I. Schlossberg
Avern Cohn
• Charles N. Shere
Nathan P. Rossen
• Boaz Siegel
John Alexander
• Gerald Tuchow
Ivan E. Barris
• Robert M. Warren
A. Albert Sugar
• Alan E. Schwartz
Dennis M. Aaron

Allen J. Kovinsky
Irving B. Ackerman

Samuel Charfoos
Stanley Schwartz
• Jacob Aispector
Leonard B. Schwartz
• Irwin J. Kasoff
Jordan Rossen
• Ronald B. Charfoos
Paul D. Borman

Lawrence K. Snider
Elliot I. Beitner
William Ellmann
Stuart E. Hertzberg
David Miro

VOTE FOR

• John H. Shepherd
• Lawrence Fleischman
• Harry Portner
• Harry L. Pliskow

BLAIR MOODY J r.,

NOV.2

No. 15 on Non-Partisan Judicial Ballot

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