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September 24, 1965 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE
JEWISH
NEWS

Incorporating the Detroit Jewish Chronicle

commencing with issue of July 20, 1951.

Member American Jewish Press Association,
Michigan Press Association, National Editorial
Association.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News
Publishing Co., 17100 West Seven Mile Road,
Detroit 35, Mich., VE 8-9363. Subscription $6 a
year. Foreign $7.
Entered as second class matter Aug. 6, 1942 at
Post Office. Detroit, Mich., under act of Congress
of March 8, 1879.


*

*

*

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor and Publisher

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ

Business Manager

SIDNEY SHMARAK

Advertising Manager

CHARLOTTE HYAMS

City Editor

*

*

*

Sabbath Scriptural Selections

This Sabbath, the 28th day of Elul, 5725,
the following scriptural selections will be
read in our synagogues:

Pentateuchal portion: Deut.
Prophetical portion: Isa.

29:9-30:20.
61:10-63:9.

Licht benshen, Friday, Sept. 24, 6:07 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Scriptural Selections

Pentateuchal portions: First day of Rosh
Hashanah, Monday, Gen. 21:1-34, Num.
29:1-6. Second day of Rosh Hashanah, Tues-
day, Gen. 22:1-24, Num. 29:1-6.
Prophetical portions: Monday, I Samuel
1:1-2:10: Tuesday, Jeremiah 31:2-20.
Fast of Gedalia will be observed next
Wednesday.

VOL. XLVI I I, No. 5 Sept. 24, 1965

Page 4

Our Prayers for
A Year of Peace

Emphasis in our New Year pray-
ers inevitably stresses the quest for
peace. As during the most trying days
of the last two wars, and especially
in the era when cruelty predominated
on the European continent, the hope
for peace at this time is expressed
with greater fervor than ever before.
We live in an embattled world. The
peace is threatened on our own con-
tinent. In Asia the situation is serious
and we are embroiled in it to such a
degree that we have reason to be con-
cerned lest we become involved in an-
other tragic world conflict. And in
the Middle East the outlook for amity
has not improved.
* * •
That is why, as we approach the
New Year 5726, we have cause for
worry and our prayers will be pri-
marily that sanity should predomi-
nate, that our statesmen should be-
come more skilled as negotiators, in
order that there should not be the
slightest reason for a conflagration
out of which the world could emerge
not only bruised by irresparably dam-
aged morally and physically.
For more than 20 years, dating
back to the crucial days at the United
Nations sessions in San Francisco,
there have been debates over world
conditions between East and West,
and as long as statesmen talked there
was no chance for war. It is when
there is an end to an exchange of
views. no matter how they might dif-
fer, that trouble can begin to brew
in all seriousness.
S * *
Indeed, we pray for sanity. We
plead that those who represent the
nations of the world, the men with
power, should be granted wisdom to
Pursue the tasks for peace. We hope
that the United Nations will be
strengthened so that the arena will be
for those who talk things through, not
the saber-rattlers and the war-mon-
gers.
May our prayers be fulfilled. May
the year 5726 develop into sufficent
striving for peace to eliminate the
fears that now haunt the minds of na-
tions everywhere-

FOR A HAPPiand PEACEFUL YEAR

A Wish for 5726: Assuring the Joy in Jewish Living

Hundreds of public meetings were conducted by our congregations and the variety of organizations thal --- --
constitute our community during the past year. With very few exceptions, they were gatherings by the elder___,
and invariably there have been expressions of concern over the absence from them of our youth.
It is safe to make the sad prediction that this will be repeated this year and in the years to come unless
we find a solution to the indifference that has set in; unless we find a way of attracting our youth to the joy
of participating with us in perpetuating a noble heritage.
We are not unaware of the serious efforts that are being exerted congregationally, in Zionist ranks, by Bnal
of
Brith and other movements to attract the youth. There are some youth functions that offer encouragement On
some progress, and we would be the first to deny that there is no hope for honorable and dignified survival.
the contrary, the indestructability of Israel is an historic fact and there is no room for defeatism in Jewish ranks.
Nevertheless, there are certain factors that are untouched. While our very young remain attached to
the synagogue until shortly after the age of confirmation and consecration, we still have not found a way of
causing them to be active in Jewish causes on the campuses, and while many of our youth interest them-
selves in Israel's progress, they seem to be unconcerned about the past.
Our experiences over the reactions of our youth seem to be reflected in the ranks of the professionals.
It is becoming exceedingly more difficult to secure good teachers for our schools, to enroll able directors for
youth work, to encourage our young people to make work in Jewish movements their careers. Thus, disin-
terestedness among the youth and a lack of good directorial personnel go hand in hand.
Both appear to be the result of a lack of good training. It is unusual to find men in charge of Jewish
movements who are steeped in Jewish knowledge, and our youth go through life only minimally informed about
their past.
We view this as the major problem facing us now, as it did for some years. We believe that the problem
is solvable, but we are not so certain that sufficient interest is being shown to assure a search for the solution.
As we approach the New Year 5726 we urge that more serious consideration than ever be given to
this shortcoming. It is in the best interests of our youth, if they are to be properly prepared to face what-
ever challenges may confront them as Jews, that they should be well informed men and women. This is a neces-
sity for happiness in Jewish life. May we attain the goal of creating such joy in Jewish living in the coming year
and the years to come.-

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