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September 10, 1965 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Did Lack of Vision

Halt Integration?

LA, Ramla

Occurrences

I ntolerable,

Here and in

Israel

Commentary
Page 2

VOLUME XLVI I—NO, 3

An Ignored Augury of 1923

Will

HE JEWISH NEWS

Qf= — r

c: —r

A Weekly Review

Auschwitz

Remain

'Forever

a Warning'?

I-1 I GA. NI

I

of Jewish Events

Analyzed in
Purely Commentary
P e 2
on Pa

Editorial
Page 4

Michigan's Only English-Jewish Newspaper—Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle

Printed in a
100% Union Shop

17100 W. 7 Mile Rd., Detroit 48235—VE 8-9364—Sept. 10, 1965

$6.00 Per Year; This Issue 20c

Israel's rotective Acts Against
El Fatah Worry 3 Arab Nations

Dr. Herzog Withdraws From
— •
British Chief Rabbinate Post

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to The Jewish News)
LONDON — The office of the British Chief Rabbin-

ate Council declared in a formal statement Tuesday that
Dr. Yaacov Herzog had informed the council that for rea-
sons of health he would be unable to assume the post of
British Commonwealth Chief Rabbi. He was named to the
post last May.
The announcement, contained in a statement issued
by Alfred H. Silverman, secretary of the council, said that
the council declared "with deep regret" that "a com-
munication has just been received from Dr. Yaacov Herzog,
intimating that, owing to the serious deterioriation of his
health, he is unable on medical advice to undertake the
post of Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations
of the British Commonwealth of Nations to which he was
appointed last May 31."
There was no indication as to the nature of Dr. Her-
zog's illness. He had resigned from the Israel foreign
service to accept the appointment.
JERUSALEM — Dr. Yaacov Herzog's surprise de-
cision not to accept the post of Britain's Chief Rabbi was
taken after medical tests in Switzerland confirmed a medi-
cal diagnosis here that he needed prolonged treatments
and recuperation from surgery, it was reported here
Wednesday.
Cc—aplications developed after an appendectomy and
doctors here advised the former Israeli envoy to avoid
the strain of public life. Dr. Herzog left last week for
Switzerland to convalesce. There he received similar ad-
vice, leading him to inform the Chief Rabbinate Council
in London that he had decided not to accept the position.
He was to have taken up those duties in November.

Israel Helps Build $333,000 Moslem
Grand Mosque of Peace in Nazareth

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to The Jewish News)

ACRE — The Israel government has built during the
last few years 10 mosques in Arab villages and contri-
buted 200,000 pounds ($66,000) for a million-pound ($333,-
000) Grand Mosque of Peace now under construction in
Nazareth, Dr. Zorah Warhaftig, Israel's religious affairs
minister, reported Wednesday.
He revealed the information at an Israel-Moslem
conference here at which he also said that the government
was ready to provide full assistance to its Moslem
citizens to enable them to make pilgrimages to Mecca. He
warned, however, that there was little the government
could do as long as the neighboring Arab governments re-
fused entry to Israeli Moslems.

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to The Jewish News)

PARIS —

The influential Le Monde reported Monday from Beirut that government
officials of Jordan, Lebanon and Syria were worried over the implications of Israel's raid
Saturday night against Jordan bases in reprisal for raids by the El Fatah terrorist
organization against Israeli settlements.
The daily newspaper said that the reprisal raid caused "great anxiety" in Amman,
Beirut and Damascus over the apparent certainty that future Israeli responses "to Arab
terrorist attacks will consist of direct military action against the territory of the state from
which the attacks are launched."
Le Monde reported that the security forces of Jordan and Lebanon were seriously
worried also by the activities of El Fatah and planned repressive measures against it.
Syria was reported to be the only Arab country which backs El Fatah, whose members
consist mainly of Palestinian Arab refugees. The newspaper reported that the other Arab
countries were doing their best to discourage El Fatah activities which might provoke a
serious clash between them and Israel.
French political circles were understood not to have been surprised by the Israeli
reprisal raid. In recent weeks, the Israeli embassy here has maintained continuous contact
with the French foreign ministry, keeping it informed of terrorist attacks on Israeli territory.
French officials were understood to have presumed that Israel might launch an operation
to discourage future raids on its territory.
A tremendous explosion that rocked the entire border area occurred Sept. 1 at Kibbutz
Eyal, northeast of Kfar Saba, about a half mile from the Jordanian border. The blast wrecked
the settlement's water pump, but there were no casualties. It was the second case of
sabotage in this kibbutz in the last six weeks.
Both attacks at Kibbutz Eyal were almost certainly the work of terrorists belonging to
El Fatah. After last night's explosion, footprints of one person were found leading from the
scene of the blast to the Jordanian border. Israel filed a complaint with the Jordan-Israeli
Mixed Armistice Commission, holding the government of Jordan responsible for the
action.

Prime Minister Eshkol Expresses Hope for End to El Fatah Raids

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Prime Minister Levi Eshkol expressed the hope Sunday that
the Jordanian government would take all possible steps to prevent the continuation of the
infiltration of saboteurs from her territory. The terrorists have been operating against
Israeli water installations, culminating in the blowing up last week of a pumping station
at Kibbutz Eyal, near Kfar Saba.
The Premier voiced the warning at the weekly Cabinet meeting which also heard a
report by Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin on the reprisal attack by Israel army units late
Saturday night against 11 pumping stations and irrigation installations on the Jordanian
side of the border, near Kalkilia.
Eshkol explained that the Kalkilia action was aimed at impressing the Jordanian gov-
ernment and populace of the extreme seriousness of Israel's attitude to the continuous infil-
trations by the Arab terrorists. The Cabinet expressed appreciation of the efficiency of the
Israeli military operation, and particularly paid tribute to the extreme caution exercised by
the Israeli troops to ensure that no loss of life occurred.
In announcing the raid earlier Sunday, the Israel Army spokesman said that all Israeli
troops returned safely from the operation, explosions from which were clearly heard as far
away as Petah Tikvah. Jordanian positions had opened machine gun fire on Kibbutz Eyal,
but were silenced by return mortar fire.
The 11 water pumping stations blasted in the Israeli raid were all situated in orange
groves in the Kalkilia district. The Army spokesman said that the Israeli troops left printed
leaflets, addressed to Jordanians living in the border area, urging them to refrain from help-
ing saboteurs to cross into Israel.
Noting that all the targets in Jordan were within about a half-mile of the border, the
spokesman said that the entire operation lasted three quarters of an hour. He said the
Israeli soldiers were ordered not to cause casualties to Jordanians, although Jordan claim-
ed that one of its soldiers was slightly wounded and one civilian was fatally wounded.

Templars Refunded for Israel Property

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to The Jewish News)
SYDNEY, Australia — Israel has undertaken to pay $14.400,000 in compensa-
tion to the Templars, a German Christian sect which had migrated to Palestine in 1939
and was later resettled by the British in Australia, for property taken over by the
Israel government, it was reported here Tuesday.
The members of the sect, which today numbers about 1,500 persons, are descen-
dants of a group that broke away from the Lutheran Church in Germany more than
100 years ago. After emigrating to Palestine, shortly before the outbreak of the
Second World War, the Templars established flourishing farming communities. In 1941,
they were sent by the British to Australia as German national internees. After the war,
they were joined by other members of the sect who migrated from Germany and most
of them became naturalized Australians.
Each member of the sect will receive nearly $9,000 in compensation from the
Israeli government.

(Continued on Page 5)

Strong, Amended Ecumenical Draft
Will Be Adopted—Archbishop Hakim

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to The Jewish News)
TEL AVIV — Archbishop George Hakim, head of the Greek Catholic community
in Israel, expressed the belief Tuesday that the draft declaration on Catholic-Jewish
relations would receive final approval at the fourth and last session of the Ecumenical
Council opening Tuesday. A strong document, explicitly denying any guilt for the
Jewish people, past and present, in the death of Jesus, was provisionally approved by
an overwhelming majority at the close of the third session.
Archbishop Hakim, who will leave this week for the final session, said that the
document would probably be amended somewhat but that the "essence of the satis-
factory text adopted last year will be maintained." .
(Publication of the Ecumenical Council draft points to a delay in enforcing
Catholic-Jewish declaration until next year. Detailed story on Page 3.)

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