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September 03, 1965 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-09-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Works by 26 Israeli Artists and Sculptors
in Exhibit Opening Here on Wednesday

C>

"Art Israel," the first major ex-
hibition of contemporary Israeli
art to be shown in the United
States, will open at the Detroit
Institute of Arts next Wednesday,
and remain through Oct. 3.
The exhibition includes the work
of 26 painters and sculptors and
introduces the latest national
school of art, since the State of
Israel was founded in 1948.
"Art Israel" was organized by
the Museum of Modern Art, New
York, under the joint auspices of
the American-Israel Cultural Foun-
dation, Inc., and the International
Council of the Museum of Modern
Art. William C. Seitz, curator of
the department of painting and
sculpture exhibitions at the Muse-
um of Modern Art, made the selec-
tions.
Some 85 works of art were
chosen by Seitz, who viewed the
work of more than 700 Israeli
artists in central locations —
New York, Paris, London and
Israel.
Seitz points out two recurrent
themes which pervade Israeli art:
"The tragic, and intensely felt
identification with Jewish tradi-
tion and its recent trials; and the
lyrical, the expression of a light-
hearted love of country, which
takes its form in the celebration
of nature."
Artists included in the exhibi-
tion are Yaacov Agam, Aika, Mor-
decai Ardon, Avigdor Arikha,
Naphtali Bezem, Moshe Castel,
Itzhak Danziger, Fima, Michael
Gross, Shamai Haber, Kosso, Ye-
hiel Krize, David Lan-Bar, Raffi
Lavie, Zvi Mairovich, Lea Nikel,
Avshalom Okashi, Ezra Orion,
Yehiel Shemi, Avigdor Stematsky,
Yeheskiel Streichman, Moshe
Tamil., Anna Ticho, Yiga el Tumar-
kin, Yaacov Wexler and Yosef
Zaritsky.
Two of Israel's most influential
teachers are represented: Morde-
cai Ardon, the leading master of
figurative symbolism, and Yosef
Zaritsky, leader of the New Hori-

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zons Group of militant abstrac-
tionists.
Of special interest is the
sculpture in the exhibition.
Sculpture has developed slowly
in Israel, in part because sculp-
ture in the round was formerly
forbidden by rabbinical law, and
partly because it presents great-
er technical problems than paint-
ing.
"Art Israel" will be previewed
by members of the Detroit Insti-
tute of Arts' Founders Society
from 8 to 10 p.m. Tuesday. The
champagne reception will be ar-
ranged by the women's committee
of the Founders Society. Chair-
man of the reception is Mrs. Law-
rence A. Fleischman and cochair-
man is Mrs. Carl B. Grawn of
Grosse Pointe.

sul general of Israel, and Mrs.
Bannore.
The exhibition will be open to
the public without charge.
Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 9
p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sun-
day. The Detroit Institute of Arts
is closed Mondays and holidays.
An 88-page catalog, with 80
black-and-white illustrations, has
been published by the Museum of
Modern Art and will be available
at the Detroit Institute of Arts
Museum Shop. It contains an intro-
duction to the exhibition by Wil-
liam C. Seitz, biographies of the
artists, statements on their work,
and a check list of the works in
the exhibition.

JERUSALEM (JTA)— The seri-
ous shortage of engineers and
architects in Israel's Civil Service
led the government Monday to de-
cide to give scholarships for the
study of engineering and architec-
ture to promising students at the
Technion-Israel Institute of Tech-
nology, Haifa.
The scholarships, however, will
go only to students willing to sign
up for a minimum of two years'
government service at the conclu-
sion of their studies.
A committee comprised of rep-
resentatives of government minis-
tries and consultants drawn from
the Technion staff will decide on
scholarship applications. Recipients
of the study grants will serve in
the housing, interior and labor

LONDON (JTA)—Jewish com-
munity leaders in Moscow have
expressed surprise at reports that
Dr. Zvi Harkavy, a rabbi who is
director of the Israel Chief Rab-
binate Library in Jerusalem, had
been approached by the Soviet
authorities on the possibility that
he serve as chief rabbi of the
USSR, a post that etas never ex-
isted before, even in Czarist times,
it was reported in dispatches from
the Soviet capital.
Dr. Harkavy said Sunday in
a meeting between a leading So-
viet diplomat and Rabbi Isser Ye-
huda Unterman, now Ashkenazi
chief rabbi of Israel, and was
again raised In subsequent meet-
ings with Soviet diplomats. Among
those who expressed surprise at
the reports was Moscow's Chief
Rabbi Yehuda Leib Levin who re-
called meeting Dr. Harkavy sev-
eral years ago but said that he
did not remember discussing any
such appointment with him.
(The New York Herald Tribune
reported from Jerusalem that Is-
rael's foreign ministry denied any
knowledge of the offer, describing
it as "sheer nonsense." Chief
Rabbi Unterman also denied ever
having heard anything about it.
Despite the denials, Dr. Harkavy
was reported to have stood firmly
by his story.)
U.S. Rabbi Urges Soviet Union
to Guarantee Rights to Jews
NEW YORK (JTA)—The Soviet
Union was urged by an American

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rabbi to take a "creative step to-
ward relaxation of the cold war,"
by extending its constitutional
guarantees of religious and cul-
tural freedom to its Jewish citi-
zens. Rabbi Israel Mowshowitz, of
the Hillcrest Jewish C e n t e r,
Queens, told a press conference
at the headquarters of the Anti-
Defamation League of Bnai Brith
that such a step would also re-
bound to the benefit of the Soviet
Union itself and, at the same time,
"liberate the cultural and religi-
ous expression of its Jewish com-
munity."
The rabbi had just returned
from a two-month world tour
which included the Soviet Union,
as chairman of the board of the
new International Synagogue at
Kennedy Airport, and as chair-
man of the Interreligious Coopera-
tion Committee of the ADL.
Rabbi Mowshowitz clearly dis-
tinguished between an official
policy of anti-Semitism—which he
said is not followed by the So-
viet Union, although there are
many anti-Semites in the country
—and a general practice by "an
atheistic, materialistic nation" of
religious and cultural discrimina-
tion which "falls heaviest upon
the Jew" because of his close
identity with his religion and his
cultural heritage.
He pointed out that the Soviet
Jewish religious community is
seeking "no more but no less than
other religious groups, - : its con-
stitutional rights to worship with-
out fear. This means, he said, the
right to publish and distribute
prayer books, establish more syna-
gogues and religious schools, in-
cluding yeshivoth (seminaries),
and to join and meet with inter-
national religious bodies of one's
faith. He indicated that Christian
and Moslem groups in the Soviet
Union do engage in such interna-
tional relationships, but that the
Jews do not.

Prosecution Appeals
Light Terms for Nazis

FRANKFURT ( J TA ) — Appeals
were filed by the prosecution
against light sentences given seven
of the defendants at the conclu-
sion of the 21-month-long trial of
Auschwitz personnel. A separate
appeal was filed against the ac-
quital of one of the three accused
Nazis found not guilty.
The eight appeals, all filed in
the German Supreme Court, con-
cerned the Auschwitz camp dentist,
who was one of three defendants
set free, and two deputy command-
ants of the death camp, one of
whom was sentenced to four years,
another to 14 years.
The prosecution had requested
life imprisonment—the maximum
sentence possible under German
law—for all eight. Only six of the
20 men on trial for 21 months had
been given life terms.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, September 3, 1965-5

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Creation of Soviet Chief Rabbinate
Denied in Dispatches from Moscow

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