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August 27, 1965 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Carolyn Anne Glenner,
Gilbert Kanat Marry

Jew ish Meals

MRS. GILBERT KANAT

Rabbi Jacob E. Segal, Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel and Cantor Reu-
ben Erlbaum united Carolyn Anne
Glenner and Gilbert Alan Kanat
in marriage recently at Adas Sha-
lom Synagogue.
Parents of the couple are Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan H. Glenner of
Greenlawn Ave. and Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Kanat of Riverside Dr.,
Birmingham.

The bride's gown of cameo
peau de soie was designed by
Christos of Galina. Pearl clusters
and tracery frosted sprays of
Alencon lace on the m o 1 de d
bodice, and the mid-length
sleeves were appliqued at the tips
with jewels. The waistline was
defined with a back bowknot
and a floating lace-detailed Wat-
teauy panel, and the tapered
skirt was circled at the hemline
with a scalloped garland of
matching lace. The peau de soie
train extended to court length.
A Florentine bow caught her
tiered veil of silk illusion, and
she carried her confirmation
Bible covered with white regal
orchids, lavender statice and ice
blue velvet leaves.

Matron of honor for her sister
was Mrs. Gerald L. Goldberg of
Philadelphia. Another sister, Mrs.
Raymond Goldbaum was brides-
maid, along with Nancy Rovner
and Susan Farer. Rachel Jo Gold-
berg, the bride's niece, was junior
bridesmaid.
Best man was the bride's broth-
er-in-law, Raymond Goldbaum, and
ushers were Gerald L. Goldberg,
another brother-in-law of the bride;
and Harold and Stuart Fishman,
cousins of the bridegroom. Junior
usher was the bride's nephew,
David Goldberg. The guests were
seated by Lee Burton, Marc Kanat,
Stanley August and Harvey Gold-
man.

Negev Region Opened
A new road from the develop-
ment area of Arad, built by the
Jewish National Fund, has made
possible the planting of the first
100,000 trees in the region of Yatir,
which borders on the Kingdom of
Jordan. A tree nursery, a foresters'
village, and the largest forest in
Israel are projected for this hither-
to undeveloped Negev region.

Some years ago while my hus-
band and I were spending part of
the month of May on the French
Riviera, we were directed to a
kosher restaurant where the food
was superb. From the large menu
we could select either our favorite
traditional dishes or the richly
flavoied specialties of the region.
Each May in remembrance of that
wonderful vacation we have for
one dinner a Daube similar to the
one we enjoyed there, one whose
piquant aroma and taste were so
typical of the local cocking.
The Daube of southern France
is a form of stew, and the name
probably comes from the daubiere,
or casserole in which the meat is
cooked. There are many different
recipes for the dish. It may or may
not contain tomatoes, it may be
simmered on the stove or baked
in it, but in most of the recipes
the meat is marinated for at least
12 hours in seasoned wine before
being cooked. The Daube we had
was made without tomatoes ano
was flavored instead with dried
mushrooms which soaked with the
meat and wine. Although in the
restaurant the noodles which ac-
companied the Daube were home-
made, we have found our very
good commercial ones make a most
acceptable substitute.
On the menu there was also a
salad with a delightfully different
dressing. It had no name, but we
promptly labeled it Salade Pro-
vencal. Since this too was highly
flavored, our host suggested that
we order it with a bland dish such
as the roast chicken, a feature of
the Sabbath dinner. It blended sur-
prisingly well with the more tra-
ditional dishes which were also
part of the meal.
• • •

By MILDRED GROSBERG BELLIN

(Copyright, 1965, Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Inc.)
SALAD PROVENCAL
cream the remaining 1/3 cup shortening
with dark brown sugar. Blend in the
1 /2 cup olive oil
cream, walnuts, and coconut. Spread in
1 /4 cup lemon juice
a thin, even layer over the top of
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
the cake. Place under the broiler,
2 teaspoons grated orange rind
about 6 inches from the source of the
1 /8 teaspoon garlic powder
heat, until the topping bubbles actively
20 pitted black olives
and begins to turn a light brown.
5 medium tomatoes
Watch carefully as it scorches quickly.
About 1 cup watercress
Cool completely before serving. To
1 /2 cup thinly sliced tender celery
serve as a dessert cut into generous
Salt and pepper to taste
squares and top with whipped cream.
If you have a blender put in it the The cake is also excellent cut into
olive oil, lemon juice, parsley, orange 20 bars and served as a coffee cake.
rind and garlic powder. Whirl until
beat with the oil, lemon juice, parsley,
smoothly blended. Add salt and pepper Hayim Greenberg School
to taste. If you have no blender, mince
the parsley as fine as possible, then Ready for Fall Applicants
orange rind, and salt and pepper to
Hayim Greenberg Hebrew - Yid-
taste. Dip the tomatoes briefly into
boiling water then into cold water. Peel dish Shule advises parents to enroll
and chill. Arrange the watercress on their children now for the fall
5 salad plates. Cut each tomato into
4 slices and arrange, overlapping, on semester beginning Sept. 9 in the
the watercress. Sprinkle with the celery, afternoon grade school classes.
and garnish with the olives. Stir the
The Hayim Greenberg Shule,
dressing to blend the ingredients and
pass separately. This amount makes which is celebrating its 50th year,
5 portions.
The dressing is also delicious as a provides a solid Jewish back-
marinade for Shish Kebobs.
ground in Yiddish, Hebrew, Jew-
• • •
ish history, Bible, etc., for chil-

Good Ways With Italian Prunes dren aged 6-13 years of age.
For a brief time during the late Transportation is provided.

summer the smooth, royal purple
fruit known variously as German,
Italian, or Idaho plums, or as Ita-
lian prunes, appears in our mar-
kets. Italian prunes is considered
the proper name, although these
are fresh freestone fruit, and have
a firm flesh that is a rich gold in
color. The flesh is tangy-sweet.
Since the plums, or Italian prunes,
are with us for so short a time, we
should make the most of their good-
ness. We can eat them from the
hand, or add them to fruit cups
or salads where, since we don't
need to peel the fruit, the rich color
in the skin is very effective. Italian
prunes are excellent in all sorts of
cooked dishes too, in puddings,
cobblers, pies, coffee cakes, cookie
bars, and cake squares. When
cooked, the flesh and juice be-
come a dep crimson. The plums are
als easy to freeze. Just cut them
in half, pit, and cover completely
with syrup to which a little ascor-
bic acid has been added.
Here are two delicious ways to
use Italian prunes in baked good-
ies, a novel cookie bar, and a cake
type dessert with a coconut top-
ping. The dessert is delicious, but
since it is rather soft and slightly
sticky, is best served with a fork.
• • •

DAUBE
2 lbs. lean, boneless chuck
11/2 cups dry red wine
1/2 oz. package dried mushrooms
The peel of a medium-sized
orange
1 bay leaf
1/4 teaspoon powdered thyme
1/2, teaspoon garlic powder
Salt and freshly ground pepper to
taste
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 medium-sized onions
1 medium-sized carrot
PLUM BARS
1 stalk celery
1 1/2 cups diced Italian prunes (also
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
called Italian, German or Idaho
1 cup pitted ripe olives, well-drained
plums)
About 3 cups hot, cooked medium 1 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
noodles
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 /2 teaspoon salt
Have the meat cut into pieces about
1 teaspoon double - acting baking
11/2x11/2x2 inches in size. Place them
powder
in a large earthenware bowl and pour
1 /2 teaspoon baking soda
the wine over them. Add the dried
1 /2 teaspoon baking soda
mushrooms, orange peel, bay leaf,
1/2 cup butter or margarine
thyme, and garlic powder. Leave the
1 cup firmly packed dark brown
orangepeel in large pieces. Cover the
sugar
bowl and refrigerate for at least 12
2 eggs
hours. Place the meat in a large sieve
1 /2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 /2 cup sour milk
and let the excess liquid drain back
into the marinade. Peel the onions and 1 /2 cup walnuts
cut them into eighths. Scrape the car-
Pit, but do not peel, the plums, and
rot and cut into eight pieces. Cut the cut them into 1/4-inch dice. Combine
celery into 1-inch pieces. Heat the oil the fruit and walnuts in a small bowl
in a heavy 4-quart saucepan over me_ and coat them with about 2 table-
dium-high heat. Add the meat and spoons of the flour. Sift the remain-
onions and stir for 5 minutes. Add the ing flour with the cinnamon, salt,
marinade with the mushrooms, bay baking powder, and baking soda, and
leaf and orange peel. Add the carrot reserve. In mixing bowl cream the
and celery. Bring to a boil, then sim- shortening and brown sugar. Add the
mer, covered, about 2 hours, until the eggs and vanilla, and beat until light
meat is tender. Remove the orange and fluffy. Alternately add the flour
peel and bay leaf. This much may be mixture and the milk. Stir in the
done in advance. Dissolve the flour in prunes and nuts. Pour the batter into
9 x 13 x 2 inch baking pan,
a little cold water and stir into the a greased
bake about 30 minutes at 350°F.,
gravy. Add the olives, salt and pepper and
until the entire
is a rich
to taste, and simmer for 5 minutes. brown, and a cake surface
tester inserted in
Place the noodles in a large deep the center comes out dry. Cool in the
platter and cover with the meat and pan. If desired, confectioners' sugar
gravy. This amount serves 5 to 6.
may be sifted over the surface. Cut
into bars of any desired size.

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DESSERT PLUM SQUARES WITH
COCONUT TOPPING
1 1/2 cups diced Italian prunes (also
called Italian, German or Idaho
plums)
11/2. cups sifted ail-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons double - acting baking
powder
1 /2 teaspoon salt
1 /2 plus 1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 /4 cup water
3/4 cup frozen orange-pineapple juice
concentrate
2 /3 cup firmly packed dark brown
sugar
1 /4 cup light (coffee) cream
1 /2 cup finely chopped walnuts
1 cup shredded coconut
Pit, but do not peel the prunes or
plums, and cut them into 1/4-inch dice.
Coat the pieces with 2 tablespoons of
flour. Sift the remaining flour with
the baking powder and salt and set
aside. Cream 1/2 cup of the shortening
with the cup of granulated sugar. Add
the eggs and beat until light. Com-
bine the water and orange-pineapple
concentrate, and add to the batter al-
ternately with the flour. Stir in the
prunes. Pour into a well-greased 9 x
13 x 2 inch baking pan, and bake at
350°F., about 30 minutes, until an even
light brown. Remove from the oven
and cool for 10 minutes. Meanwhile,

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
22—Friday, August 27, 1965

The nursery for children 3 1/2-5
opens Sept. 8. There are only a few
openings remaining in the group,
according to the director, Movsas
Goldoftas. The nursery school gives
a Jewish background to the young
child, teaching him Yiddish and
Hebrew songs, celebration of holi-
days, simple Hebrew vocabulary,
games, painting, arts and crafts,
rhythm band and other activities
under supervision by the State of
Michigan.
Call UN 4-6319 for registration
and information or visit the school
on the second floor of the Labor
Zionist Institute.

Max Sosin Toastmaster
at Bnai David Event

Max Sosin will be the toastmas-
ter at the Gong. Bnai David
Israel Bond dinner Sept. 15 at
the congregation, 24350 Southfield.
The event will imwoz-n,
honor Max Os-
tr o w , chairman
of the Chevra Ka-
disha and a mem-
ber of the board
of trustees of
Bnai David for
30 years.
Former presi-
dent Morris J.
Brandwine, a n d
Jack Lieberman,
a leader of the
congregation for
many years, will
be the dinner-co-
chairmen. Jack J.
Kraizman, presi-
Sosin
dent, will greet the audience. Rabbi
Hayim Donin and Cantor Hyman
J. Adler will give the tribute to
Ostrow.
Henny Youngman, night club
comedian, will be the guest artist.
For dinner reservations call the
Bond office, DI 1-5707.

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