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August 06, 1965 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-08-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Theodor Hen! in the 'Concordia'

Brandeis, Oxford Physicists
Make Science Breakthrough

WALHAM, Mass. — The most

he revealed
(This article is based on ma- I Freie Presse," as well as Karl Emil initiators and authors of the Aus- relations with them
personality
. . ."
witty
and
a
gay
trian
laws
relating
to
literature,
Franzos,
Theodor
Hertzka,
E.
terial gut at the author's disposal
art and photography.
In the Festschrift of the "Con-
by the "Concordia" a few years Schiff, Wengraf, and others.
Some years later, when Herzl cordia," Herzl was described as
before World War II.)
"Concordia" organized a yearly

* * *
ball and on several occasions (1890,
By JOSEF FRAENKEL
1898, 1899) Herzl was on the com-
"Concordia," a society of journal- mittee which issued a so-called
ists and authors, was founded in "Ladies' Gift." This was usually a
Vienna in 1859. Under the guid- booklet of proverbs, aphorisms,
ance of its founders, the poets and cartoons and "questions without
writers L. A. Frank], B. G. Fried- answers." Every lady attending
mann, E. Mautner, F. Schuselka, the ball was presented with a
and others, the society began to "gift."
The "Ladies' Gift" of 1897 had
exert considerable influence over
Vienna's literary life. The city's cartoons by Theo Zasche and
organized elite and its press-lords rhymes by Julius Bauer, one of
them on the subject of Herzl.
met at the "Concordia."
Theodor Herzl had made an im- Z asche depicted Herzl, sitting de-
pression in Viennese literary ected
j
and in tears, on a broken
• le - at a comparatively early column engraved with the word
age with his feuilletons and plays. "Jerusalem," in front of the ruins
On Feb. 26, 1888, he applied for of the Sacred Temple. The car-
toon was based on the famous
membership in "Concordia."
words: "By the waters of Babylon
"I have been working in Vi- we sat and wept . . ." The caption
enna as a writer for ten years. was by Julius Bauer (who used to
Most Viennese newspapers have
"stab and heckle, provoking both
published my feuilletons during laughter and tears"), as follows:
this time. At present I am a
"Pram Sudermann his beard,
regular contributor to the "Ber-
His irony from Heine,
liner Tagblatt" and the "Neues
But his talent so intense

Pester Journal!' A collection of
my essays .was published about a
year ago in book form and a
sequel will appear shortly. Two
of my plays were staged—"Taba-
rin" (1884) and "His Highness"
(1885).

Is wholly his alone.

was engaged upon the brochure
"The Jewish State," he noted in
his diary similar legislations on
literature and the press for the
future Jewish State.
The "Concordia" used to or-
ganize literary evenings and mem-
bers had an "exceptional pleasure"
on March 2, 1902, when Herzl read
his play, "Solon in Lydia." The
hero of this play was an unhappy
youth who could turn stone into
flour. Wise Solon. however, had
him poisoned rather than allow
mankind to be freed from daily
toil. The large assembled audience
was greatly stirred by Herzl's read-
ing—"his natural manner," simple
and unaffected, as if "ostenta-
tiously scorning theatrical poses."
The annual general meeting of
1905 paid tribute to Herzl's mem-
ory. The president, Edgar von
Thurnsee, delivered a memorial
address, part of which is quoted
below:
". . . Here's achievements be-

He sees a goal, a distant goal,
Awake and in dreaming:
For in these days he yearns
With Jews a State to build."

Max Nordau also wrote a poem
This application is of interest, for a "Ladies' Gilt" (1902), dedi-

as it shows that, soon after moving I cated to the women of Vienna:

7

"To the lovely Viennese!
from Budapest to Vienna (1878),
Ever ready were we to sing
Herzl had articles "in most Vien-
Your praise. oh "beauteous"
nese newspapers."
Wienerin.
Herzl's application for member-
Acclaimed far and wide as
ship was considered favorably and
Patron of art and beauty.
on May 9, 1888, he became a mem-
In Party strife be likewise too,
ber of the society. His membership
A reconciling Sabine . . ."
card bears the number: 534.
The "Concordia" had a powerful
In the "Con-cordia" Herzl met
old acquaintances and made new say in the introduction of legisla-
friends. Later, many of them were tion concerning the press, litera-
to be of help to him as writer, ture and authorship. At the annual
dramatist and politician. He spent general meeting of 1891, V. K.
much of his time at the "Concor- Schembera, Nikolaus Lumba and
dia," where he encountered, among Theodor Herzl discussed the neces-
others, his loyal friend, Oswald sity of treaties between states for
Boxer (who was to die a few years the protection of Austrian writers
later in Rio de Janeiro, while help- against literary piracy. A "Corn-
ing in the work of resettling Rus- mittee for the Reform of Literary
sian Jews in Brazil); also Prof. Copyright" was formed, of which
Leon Kellner, who, in 1920, wrote Herzl was a member. It prepared
a biography of Herzl; his former a memorandum which demanded:
1. Extension of copyright pro-
fellow-member of the students'
association "Albia," Hermann Bahr; tection to 50 years;
2. Equal copyright protection for
Josef Bloch, publisher of the Jew-
ish weekly "Oesterreiehische Wo- plays and musicals as for other
ehenschrift" (who was at first pro- literary works;
3. The extension of copyright
Zionist, then adopted a negative
attitude); the dramatic critic, Lud- protection to posthumous works;
4. Cancellation of the right of
wig Speidel, who often praised
Herzl's plays; and the directors of third parties to re-edit or drama-
the Vienna "Burgtheater," DT. tise literary works after only a
Paul Schlenther and Freiherr von short period, etc.
Berger, who put on some of his As a writer, playwright and
plays. Here too, he met the "men lawyer, Herzl was able to submit
of power," Moritz Benedikt and many new suggestions. ParliaMent
Edward Backer, who were later to' did in fact adopt this legislation,
become his superiors on the "Neue and Herzl thus became one of the

DAYENU

longed not only to journalism
and literature, which have lost in
him one of their finest and most
brilliant talents, but also to that
great political movement, Zion-
ism, whose ideological creator-
he was, and as the leader whir
was venerated br'h in the Old
and in the New . .7or/d by many
thousands of followers . . . He
has enriched the German stage
with a number of moving plays
. . . As a novelist, too, Herd was
outstanding . . . His fellow-
journalists will never forget
Herzl's noble character. In his

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, August 6, 1965-29

follows:
". . . One of the most gifted
of men among Viennese essayists
. . . Never could we have believed
that this stately, vigorous, hand-
some man, whose eyes blazed with

life, and hardly past 40, would be

precise test ever performed on
the basic symmetry principle of
"Time Reversal Invariance" and
the most sensitive measurement
ever made on an atomic beam
apparatus have been conducted
by two physicists from Brandeis
and Oxford Universities.
The two major breakthroughs
by Dr. Edgar Lipworth, professor
of physics at Brandeis, and Dr.
Pat Sandars of Oxford, a recent

carried off by illness in only two
years . . . In the company of his
colleagues Herzl liked to show a
kindly, almost childlike humor
which made him a most agreeable
companion. He lost it later when
he became engrossed in the Jewish
national problem . . ."

visiting professor at Brandeis, will
help to settle questions that have
puzzled scientists about the struc-
ture of the electron and other

"Concordia res parvae crescunt,
discordia .maximae dilabuntur" —

where
fine
Oriental Rugs
1:1
are
sold

fundamental particles.

this Concordia motto also was
Herzl's motto during his Zionist
activities. "In concord small affairs

flourish, discord ruins big ones."

"You don't get ulcers from what

you eat — you get them from what's
eating you."

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but another Dead Sea
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