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July 23, 1965 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W. German Prosec utor Dismissed; W as Convicted as Nazi War Criminal

BONN (JTA)—The state parlia-
ment of the Province of Rhine-
land-Pfalz decided unanimously to
dismiss Leo Drath, chief prose-
cutor in the city of Frankenthal,
who had been suspended several
months ago on charges that he was
convicted as a Nazi war criminal
shortly after World War IL All
three political parties joined in the
vote to fire him.
Drath was sentenced as a war
criminal in Luxembourg, serving
a prison sentence. After his re-
lease, he returned to his home in
Frankenthal and later became the
city's chief prosecutor.
His suspension was ordered
when the former Rhineland-Pfalz
minister of justice revealed his
Nazi record and postwar convic-
tion, A parliamentary committee
investigated the charge and found
it true.
The German Judges Association
in Berlin warned in a resolution
against any relaxation in the prose-
cution of Nazi war criminals. The
jurists criticized proposals in the
Bundestag, the West German par-
liamentary lower house, to adopt

legislation distinguishing between
"major" and "minor" war crimi-
nals which would give local prose-
cutors authority to drop charges
against "minor" criminals.
The jurists declared it was im-
possible to draw a line between
more serious and less serious Nazi
war crimes and that there should
not be any division in the handling
of the criminals.
Meanwhile, in Ludwigsburg,
Erwin Schuele, chief prosecutor
of West Germany's Central Of-
fice for the Prosecution of Nazi
War Criminals, said he failed
to understand charges made by
the Polish news agency in Wars-
saw, which accused West Ger-
many of not being "intensive
enough" in pursuing judicial-
proceedings against Nazi war
criminals.
The Polish article alleged that
when Dr. Schuele and a group of
other officials visited Poland re-
cently, to examine archives in
connection With the Frankfurt
trial of former Auschwitz death
camp personnel, they were given
masses of new materials, but have
not informed Poland how those
data would be used.
Among the new evidence, the
Warsaw agency charged, were
documents relating to heretofore
undisclosed details about the up-
rising in the Warsaw Ghetto in
1943; charges relating to anti-
Jewish atrocities in the death

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camps of Sobibor, Stutthof and
Belzec; and specific charges
against Werner Dentzki, who had
been the Nazi mayor of Lodz.
"All persons mentioned in the
article," said Dr. Schuele, "are in
our possession, will face trial. The
Poles were given a list in writing
about all the trials."

4,

*

Bergen-Belsen
HANNOVER (JTA) Survivors of
the infamous Bergen-Belsen death
camp, near this West German
city, participated Stundtay in a
pilgrimage to the camp site on the

Yiddishkeit
Marches On

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ
(Copyright, 1965, JTA, Inc.)
In a profile recently of a dis-
tinguished woman, the New York
Times noted that while all admit-
ted her abilities, some also char-
acterized her as a "quetch" and a
"yenta."
' "Quetch" and Yenta are, of
course, good Yiddish words and
now that the Times, the pride of
American journalism, employs
them, we may take that as indicat-
ing a triumph of Yiddishkeit.
But such signs are evident on all
sides. For instance, also not so long
ago, in Jerusalem, a farewell party
was given to some African students
who had been studying in Israel.
Several of the students were ask-
ed to state what they thought was
the best thing from Israel that
they were taking back to their
native Africa.
The first one said he regarded
as most important the lessons in
agriculture he had learned.
The second called on, said he
had been studying electronics in
Israel and he hoped he was taking
back a knowledge of that to help
in the development of his country.
The third African student said
he was taking back "a bisselle
Yiddishkeit."
Maybe it is the last which will
do most good.
Speaking of Yiddishkeit, Aleph
Katz of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency staff, has a new Yiddish
book out. Stephen B e n e t won
fame for "The Devil and Daniel
Webster." Aleph Katz has writ-
ten a Yiddish poem about "The
Devil and Feivel, the Baker."
The Katz poem-story is contained
in Die Emmese Chasseneh, which
recently was awarded the prize for
best book of Yiddish poetry. Aleph
is a great admirer of the Bratzlev
rabbi, famous for his story telling.
He possess much of the same story
telling quality himself. And he is
no imitator. He has his own unique
individual style. Unlike so much of
modern poetry, his can be read
with enjoyment. We should like to
see The Devil and Feivel the Bak-
er given the wider audience it de-
serves by translation into English
and we know who could make an
excellent translation—Aleph him-
self.
Aaron Zeitlin, on the occasion of
the tenth anniversary of the death
of Einstein, tells an amusing anec-
dote about the great physicist. On
the occasion of the seventh anni-
versary of Israel's independence,
he says, Abba Eban asked Einstein
to say a few words in greeting to
Israel.
"Millions of people will listen in
on television," said Eban to Ein-
stein.
"Then I will become famous,"
said Einstein.
We recently came across an Ein-
stein anecdote reading The
Memoirs of Sir Herbert Samuel.
He tells how one artist pursued
Einstein when the scientist ar-
rived for the exercises at the
founding of the Hebrew Univer-
sity. Samuel remarked to Einstein
that he supposed artists often ask-
ed him to pose.
Yes, chuckled Einstein, so much
so, that once on a train in Italy,
when a stranger, curious about his
identity and occupation, asked
Einstein what he did for a living,
Einstein told him, "I am an artist's
model."

I

occasion of the 20th anniversary
of Bergen - Belsen's liberation.
Among the pilgrims were survi-
vors now living in the United
States, Canada, France, Israel and
Germany.
Except for the recitation of the
kaddish, voiced by one survivor at
the mound where many Jews had
been buried in a mass grave, the
services and prayers were con-
ducted in silence. Said Joseph
Rosensaft, chairman of the sur-
vivors' organization, after the ser-
vices: "Here, on the mass grave,
I feel this is a time for silence."
In this city, after the pilgrim-
age, religious services were held
in memory of Norbert Prager, a
former member of the Central
Committee of Displaced Persons
in the British Zone, who died on
the eve of the pilgrimage, at age
74.
In Jerusalem, a monument to the
victims who perished at the hands
of the Nazis in the Bergen-Belsen
concentration camp was unveiled
atop Mount Zion Tuesday in the
presence of government repre-
sentatives, communal leaders and
hundreds of survivors of the camp,
many of whom came for the un-
veiling from abroad in a group
headed by Josef Rosensaft, chair-
man of the Federation of Bergen-
Belsen survivors.
Also taking part in the cere-
monies was Brig adier Glyn
Hughes, who served as chief medi-
cal officer of the British Army unit
that liberated the camp in 1945.
Cantor Moshe Kraus of Johannes-
burg, himself a survivor
of the
camp, chanted the prayers.

High Schools to Merge

ALANTIC CITY (JTA) — Plans
were announced here for the mer-
ger under the auspices of the Jew-
ish Education Committee here of
the Atlantic County High School
of Jewish Studies with the Hebrew
High School of Beth Judah Syna-
gogue. The combined school will
receive financial suport from the
Atlantic City Federation of Jewish

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Friday, July 23, 1965-9

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