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July 16, 1965 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Israeli Journalist Views Mapai Party Crisis,
Links With 'Diaspora Press' on Visit Here

BY CHARLOTTE HYAMS
The political discord that has
split the Mapai Party asunder will
not result in David Ben-Gurion's
election as prime minister, it is the
belief of an Israeli political writer
who whisked into and out of De-
troit last week.
Aryeh Zimuki, of the independ-
ent daily Yedioth Achronoth (La-
test News), said he "personally"
feels the people of Israel are be-
hind Levi Eshkol and will show it
at the polls next fall. "Ben-Gur-
ion's fight is a personal thing," he
said. "There is really nothing sub-
stantial in his basis for opposi-
tion::

The 47-year-old journalist and
one-time policeman-press offi-
cer was here on return from a
tour of South America in an ef-
fort to consolidate ties between
his country and the Jewish press
of the Spanish-speaking dias-
pora.

It was in his capacity as presi-
dent of the Jerusalem Journalists
Association and coordinator of the
World Bureau of Jewish Journal-
ists that he was making this ob-
servation-good will tour.
Zimuki explained that Israel's
Journalists Association, "one of
the best organized trade unions in
the country," created the World
Bureau four years ago to improve
relations between the Israeli press
and Jewish press abroad.
The attitude of Israeli editors
toward diaspora Jewry had not
been particularly friendly. Foreign
Jewish newsmen complained that
the flow of news was one way, that
Israelis were told little about world
Jewry.
Today, however, there has been
a thaw in the freeze, and Zimuki is
certain the World Bureau has
something to do with it. "It's
changed the attitude of Israeli
journalists to the point where for-
eign Jewish correspondents are
welcomed warmly."

Another advance is the publica-
tion of a quarterly, Korot ("Hap-
penings") in three languages—
English, Hebrew and Yiddish—
which outlines the problems of
the Jewish press abroad. He also
hopes to initiate a journalists' ex-
change program between Israel
and this country.

Zimuki said symposia on radio
have been arranged, and plans are
afoot for the publication of both
an almanac of the world Jewish
press and monographs about Jew-
ish newspapers before World. War
II. "There are signs, there are
signs," he said, "but we must find
a common language."



strictions, Zimuki cited the case of
Elie Cohen, the Jew who was
hanged as a spy in Syria. "Our ed-
itors agreed not to write about him
during the proceedings. We men-
tioned it only after his death. We
had hoped in this way we could
save him."
Zimuki was asked about censor-
ship and the "Lavon Affair,"
which, ostensibly, has been the rea-
son for Ben-Gurion's opposition to
Eshkol. Newspapers in Israel have
never explained what the "security
risk" was, although the foreign
press and wire services have come
up with details to some degree of
a c cur ac y.
Zimuki said simply: "We don't
want to give it an 'official note."'

ARYEH ZIMUKI

He was impressed with the
American Jewish press, but cau-
tioned that the future belongs to
youth—"Not enough are entering
this field. With rare exceptions do
I meet journalists in the Jewish
press who are under 60."
Zimuki is proud of the achieve-
ments of the Israel Journalists As-
sociation, whose 650 members have
seen wages jump to an all-time
high, maintain headquarters in
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv and sub-
mit cases to their own "press
council," which acts as a court of
ethics for all journalists in such
matters as libel. The latter is head-
ed by former Chief Justice Itzhak
Olshan.

Arriving in Detroit at almost
the same time the world learned
of Moshe Sharett's death, Zimuki
had only praise for the former
premier and foreign minister.

"He was the conscience of the
nation—a loss for Israel, for the
world Zionist movement, for the
labor movement. He sought peace
between Jews and Arabs, and as a
literary figure he valued beauty
His desire for unity is needed now,
especially in the current leader-
ship struggle. We greatly need
such men of moral influence."

Chair in Jewish History
Established at Ohio State

Schwartz-Schenk
Vows Set for Sept.

5

Leonard Marks
New Director of
U.S. Info Agency

WASHINGTON (JTA) — Presi-
dent Johnson appointed Leonard

H. Marks to be the new director
of the U.S. Information Agency,
to succeed Carl T. Rowan. Marks,
of Washington, is a board member
of the Communications Satellite
Corp. and is experienced in the
field of communications.

Officers Are Named
by Yiddish Folks Farein

Yiddish Folks Farein recently
installed for the 1965-66 term Ed-
win Schwartz, president; Gordon
Seedberg, vice president; Julius
Seligon, treasurer; and Mrs. Jack
Stein and Mrs. Edwin Schwartz,
MISS LYNDA SCHWARTZ
secretaries.
Also elected were Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Schwartz
Nathan Standler, Mrs. Mary Braz-
of Northlawn Ave., announce the
ner, Ben Heyman and Mrs. Minnie
engagement of their daughter Tanner, hospitality.
Lynda Fern to David Ruven
Schenk, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Schenk of Wilmette, Ill.
Miss Schwartz attended the Uni-
and his ORCHESTRA
versity of Sheffield, England, and
"Mussic of Its Best
is a graduate o f the University of
Michigan, where she was affiliated
for Your Guests"
with Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority.
Her fiance received his bachelors
and masters degrees at U of M,
and was a member of Sigma Alpha
Mu Fraternity.
A Sept. 5 wedding is planned,

FRANK PAUL

EL 7-1799

goanciatiorts

hy ,RtitA

"Reading is important because
Corsets-Brassieres
it helps us to more life; if it help-
COLUMBUS (JTA)—Establisb- ed us only to more books, we could
Expertly F itted
ment of a Samuel and Esther Mel- do without it." —John Erskine
20127
W. 7 Mile Rd.
ton professorship of Jewish history
and studies at Ohio State Univer- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
538-5575
Parking In Rear
sity was approved by the univer- 22—Friday, July 16, 1965
Press censorship in Israel is sity's board of trustees.
generally self-imposed and, at
The position within the depart-
that, is imposed only on military
A SS00,1,AMEIS
and classified information like ment of history will be supported
aliyah problems, Zimuki said. by a gift through the university's
LI 8-1116
Photographers — Specializing in
The censorship board is com- development fund from Samuel
Color
Candids
and
Movies
M.
Melton,
industrial
and
civic
LI
8-2266
prised half of military men and
leader. Mr. and Mrs. Melton will
half of editors.
As an example of such self-re- give the university $20,000 per
year for a trial period up to five
years.
If, after this time, it is decided
Golfer Jeffrey Cohen
to continue the professorship on
Scores Hole-in-One
a permanent basis, they will give
Jeffrey Cohen, 13, scored a hole- an additional $250,000 for its sup-
in-one at the French Lick-Sheraton port.
Valley Golf Course in Indiana July
6. He used a seven iron on the 125-
Radomer Aid to Meet
yard, No. 13 hole.
Radomer Aid and Ladies Society
CALL: LI 7-0896 or LI 5-2737
A hole-in-one is generally a once- will hold a special meeting 8:30
in-a-lifetime occurence, in which p.m. Tuesday at the Workmen's
the golfer sinks his ball in the hole Circle Center. Refreshments will
on only one stroke.
be served by Mrs. Gussie Lax of
Jeffrey is the son of Mr. and Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in honor of
Mts. Sol Cohen, 19182 Santa Rosa. her grandson's marriage.


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Quartet of doctors (from left) are Jonathan, Jane, Saul and
David Rosenzweig.

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Now there are four doctors in
the Rosenzweig family, the new-
est MD, having just been added
through a Wayne State University
Commencement.
Dr. Jonathan Rosenzweig, the
recent graduate, now interning at
Sinai Hospital, is shown receiving
the congratulations of his father,
Dr. Saul Rosenzweig.
The MD sister and MD bro-
ther are Jane and David, both of
whom also hold degrees from
Wayne's medical school.
Dr. Jane is completing a dual

residency in dermatology at Re-
ceiving and • Memorial hospitals.
Dr. David is an instructor at Mil-
waukee's Marquette University
School of Medicine where he spe-
cializes in chest diseases.
The proud father, who is a
clinical associate professor of in-
ternal medicine at Wayne State
University School of Medicine and
chief of cardiology at Sinai, earn-
ed his doctor of medicine degree
in 1924 from the University of
Michigan. The family home is at
2542 W. Boston.

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