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June 25, 1965 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jacobs' Is Curly Jewish?' Due Soon

In October Atheneum will pub-
lish "Is Curly Jewish?", a ram-
bunctious memoir of American
society, written by Paul Jacobs.
The Atheneum book, due soon, is
a revealing account of how Jacobs
has sought to discover — in Ameri-
ca, behind the iron curtain and in
Israel — whether there is any con-
nection between his being a radical
and his identity as a Jew. His an-
swer to the question posed in the
title has significance for every
American, Jew or gentile alike.
The author's career is typical of
the American radical and mirrors
a vivid panorama of the American
scene from the 1930s to today.
Jacobs joined the Young Com-
munist League in the 1930s, was
expelled for Trotskyist leanings,
became a Trotskyite and then left
the movement to become a union
organizer. He served in the Army
from 1942 to 1945 and after his
discharge went to work for the
American Jewish Committee.
Three years later he returned to
the trade unions and finally, in
1955 began a new career as a
writer.
He is currently on the staffs
of the Center for the Study of

Democratic Institutions at Santa
Barbara, Calif., and the Center for
World Publishing Co. (2231 W.
the Study of Law and Society at 110th St., Cleveland 2) has issued
the University of California, an authoritative work on dieting
Berkley.
suitable for cardiac cases.
Florence Field, an expert on
dieting, is the author of "Gour-
met Cooking for Cardiac Diets."
This is a classic in its field. By
means of recipes, charts, tables of
recommended allowances, infor-
mation about low-caloried foods,
The controversy over the ques- Miss Field guides the reader to-
tion of legislation aimed at barring wards good, tasty cooking, uti-
incitement to racial and religious lizing all types of foods and at
hatred is highlighted in a World the same time sticking to the rules
Jewish Congress study, "The Crime for the protection of cardiacs.
This revised edition of Miss
of Incitement to Group Hatred,"
which has been issued in New Field's previous work, with an in-
troduction by Dr. Harold Feil,
York.
contains basic advice about re-
The 80-page booklet, prepared ducing, losing weight and rules
by Dr. Natan Lerner, of the WJC's for low-caloried diets as well as
international affairs department, foods to avoid.
summarizes measures contained in
So skillful is this compilation
international and regional declara- that there is hardly' a food of
tions, conventions and draft con- merit that is eliminated.
ventions, as well as legislation to
Here is a sample of one of the
curb incitement to racial and re- recipes offered:
ligious hatred, covering 32 coun-
BAKED STUFFED WHOLE FISH
Approximately, per serving,
tries.

Congress Surveys
Curbs on Racial
Hate Incitements

Dr. Lerner's study notes that
the World Jewish Congress, as
long ago as 1948. took a stand
in favor of the enactment of
such curbs, and details action
taken by the global Jewish body
to ensure the adoption of meas-
ures of this nature, as well as
that taken by many of its con-
stituents.

UJA Running Above 64

An upward trend in community
campaigns on behalf of the 1965
nationwide United Jewish Appeal
and local Jewish causes was noted
by Max M. Fisher of Detroit, UJA
general chairman, in a report to
the UJA executive committee, at a
three-day retreat in Tuxedo, N.Y.
A study of campaign achieve-
ments in 376 communities, exclu-
sive of New York City, whose cam-
paigns are under way or com-
pleted, Fisher stated, revealed a
total of $66,476,000 raised to date,
for an increase of 9.7 per cent,
compared to the $60,476,000 these
same communities raised at this
time last year.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
14—Friday, June 25, 1965





.....

'Gourmet Cooking
for Cardiac Diets'

In issuing the study, the World
Jewish Congress expressed the
hope that it will stir "even incite
—nations and governments, some
of which are currently considering
suitable steps, to embody within
their legal systems measures that
will contribute to global action to
bar the bigots from inflaming
others with their racial and re-
ligious hostilities."
Other chapters of the study de-
scribe international as well as
regional action and national legis-
lation and draft legislation in 32
countries.

100-150 calories
The following fish may be used:
Whitefish
Bluefish
Red snapper
Pike
Bass
Cod
Salmon trout
Haddock
1 tablespoon minced parsley
2 tablespoons salad oil
1 onion, chopped
Pepper
Pinch marjoram or Herb Blend
1-2 tomatoes, quartered (optional)
Have .whole fish cleaned and boned
but not split. Remove head and tail.
Wash fish and wipe dry. Stuff fish
with well - seasoned Low - Sodium
Bread Stuffing or rice. Close opening
with toothpicks or sew shut. Place
fish in baking pan or on glass platter.
Add seasoning and onion. Pour salad
oil in pan. Add tomatoes (optional).
Bake in a moderate oven, 350 de-
grees F., until fish flakes easily with
a fork. Allow 15 minutes per pound.
Serve with slices of lemon or with
sauce.

Soviet Policy Against Jews Not New
U.S. Protest Brought Action in 1869

American Jewigh protests against
Russian anti-Semitism originated
nearly 100 years ago and led to
the first U.S. government action
dealing exclusively with Russian
Jewry.
A Bnai Brith appeal presented
to President Ulysses S. Grant in
1869, urging U.S. intervention in
the discriminatory expatriation of
20,000 Jewish families from the
Bessarabian boundary area, ulti-
mately resulted in a cancellation
of the expatriation order, Evelyn
Levow Greenberg reported to the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety.
Mrs. Greenberg, research analyst
for Bnai Brith, said that the de-
portations were halted largely be-
cause of U.S. government dis-
approval. The United States was
then one of Russia's strongest al-

In November 1869, Russia re-
newed an obsolete 44-year-old
law prohibiting Jews from liv-

ing within '7% miles of the coun-
try's boundaries. The city of
Kishinev—with a population of
20,000 Jewish families — had
fallen within the f o r b i d d e n
boundary area 113 years earlier
when Russia lost territory in the
Crimean War. It was not until
1869, however, that newly ar-
rived Bulgarian emigrants de-
manded the law be enforced to
expel Jews from the city.

When news of the deportation
order reached the United States,
Bnai Brith's Elijah Lodge in Wash-
ington sent a committee to per-
sonally present an appeal to Presi-
dent Grant urging the United
States to take proper action "to
afford relief to the people so

"Medicine is the noblest of all
professions."
—Falaquera, Sefer HaMaalot

HANK
NEWMA

/1 \

PAUL NEWMAN

WE'RE THE DODGE BOYS
THAT SAVE YOU CASH!

UPSIDE DOWN YOU WON'T
FIND A FINER WINE THAN

PAUL NEWMAN'S

PA ItTA N Dodge

&Ja e

k

Now

2 SER O V FE UY SOT UO I

IF YOU TURN THE

ii.T •gr j .1
• st Ci

Many of the recipes are 'unsuit-
able for kashrut observers, but
there are enough for those honor-
ing and observing the dietary laws
to make this as useful a book for
Jews as for non-Jews.

harshly dealt with."
The President was deeply moved
by the appeal.
"It is too late. in this age of
enlightenment, to persecute any-
one on account of race, color, or
religion," he told the committee.
Secretary of State Hamilton Fish
was instructed by President Grant
to write the United States minis-
ter in St. Petersburg to investi-
gate the deportation and make a
report to Washington. Eugene
Schuyler, the U.S. consul at Revel
and an expert in Russian affairs,
also supplied information.
The President's interest in the
matter — which was widely re-
ported in the European press —
is believed a main reason the Rus-
sian government postponed the de-
portation order, Mrs. Greenber
said.
It was never renewed.

Milan Wineries, Detroit, Mich.

j

211 S. SAGINAW, PONTIAC/LI.. 9-6161



"kVA;

so THAT
THEY TOO
SHALL
KNO

BETH ABRAHAM SYNAGOGUE

is pleased to announce the opening of our own

Beth Abraham Hebrew School

Now for all members and non-members.
Religious instruction by a competent staff,
for boys and girls — on Sundays and week-
days, Synagogue Building or Sou th field
Branch. Register any day of the week 9-4:30,
and 10-1 on Sunday in the Synagogue Build-
ing, Seven Mile Road West at Greenlawn.
U N 1-6696.

Transportation Available
Israel I. Halpern, Rabbi — R. Schlaff, Pres.

REGISTER NOW

for the new

fall classes,

kindergarten through grade

10, including Bar Mitzvah,

Bas Mitzvah and Consecra-

tion. Kindergarten through

grade two Sundays only.

Grades 3 through 7 three

times weekly. (Including

Sunday).

FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION, COME VISIT WITH US, OR CALL, UN 1-6696

c-?=-;

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