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May 07, 1965 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Comments and Suggestions Roll In
on the Status of Hebrew Teachers

.Editor, The Jewish Nev -s:
Your editorial of April 16 show-
ed real insight into the vast prob-
lem concerning the Jewish teach-
er and the Hemshekh frontiers.
Your sympathetic treatment of the
subject reflected objectivity and
profound concern about the fu-
ture.
Now, let us analyze the chal-
lenges in their broadest phases.
Let it be said that the teacher
shortage is of our own making—
be it through omission or commis-
sion.
We have known for a long time
that the American Jewish commu-
nity will be saddled with the
problem of shortages in teaching
personnel in our Jewish schools.
We knew that we could no longer
rely upon the supply of Jewish
teachers from Europe. Yet we—
all those responsible—lacked the
will, the determination and the
foresight to create the climate
and provide the opportunities
and challenges for young people
to enter the field of Jewish edu-
cation and thereby striking at the
Indifference toward continuing a
vibrant Jewish life.
It can serve no good purpose to
assign blame for this shortsighted-
ness and neglect. However, the
formidable "neglectors" have been
and will continue to be those per-
sons in leadership of the Jewish
Community — the executives, the
professionals, the lay board and
Committees, the spiritual leaders,
the Jewish education leadership
who have not exhibited fortitude
and imagination and the vast par-
ent group.
Therefore, to find solutions to
the problems we face, requires
the wisdom and the determina-

tion of precisely the same groups
who practically abdicated their
basic Jewish responsibility of
assuring the continuation and
enhancement of Jewish life.
Ta attract young people to en-
ter the Jewish teaching profession,
the community must be prepared
to offer them opportunities for
growth, fulfillment and advance-

ment. We must create a favorable
environment for our teachers.
Their efforts should be recognized
and appreciated. Their counsel and

I

Men's Clubs

involvement in matters of Jewish
education planning should be
sought. They should come in con-
tact with parents and members of
school committees and boards of
directors. They should be guaran-
teed salaries according to an
equitable scale arrived at by lay
committees and teacher repre-
sentatives.
Their teacher- organization
should be recognized by the lay
boards, as the bargaining agents
for the individual and collective
welfare of its membership. They
should be guaranteed tenure,
fringe benefits and opportunities
to appear in case of grievance
against the employing institutions.
I believe we have countless
numbers of young men and women
who can be encouraged to enter
the field of Jewish teaching—
young people who possess the
spark of devotion and the "call-
ing" to serve their people. We
should stir them, evoke in them
a brand of Yiddishkeit which has
lain dormant.
DR. SYLVAN J. GINSBURGH
Principal, United Hebrew
High School.

need to become cognizant that in
order for the Jewish community
to attract its youth to the teach-
ing profession it must:
1. Give the capable person the
opportunity to apply the
knowledge he has learned at
the university to the teach-
ing of Hebrew.
2. Allow him to experiment
with new methods and inno-
vations.
3. Establish supportive services
for the teacher and student,
such as guidance and coun-
seling.
4. Install foreign language -
laboratories and other ap-
propriate equipment in the
Hebrew schools.
5. Provide the young American
Hebrew teacher with a learn-
i n g experience in Israel
which would instill in him
the confidence that he knows
a living language and not
just a literary one, by hav-
ing been exposed to the land
and its people.
6. Facilitate the opportunity to
do research in conjunction
with the construction of a
* * *
curriculum that meets the
Editor, The Jewish News:
needs of the community.
Congratulations on your posi-
7. Remunerate the Hebrew
tive editorial for the need of im-
teacher with a salary which
proved Jewish education. How-
would be commensurate with
ever, more added reverence for
his education and abilities.
the Hebrew teacher will not at-
8. See to it that parents will
tract able youth to its teaching
actively participate in He-
profession.
brew education as they do in
The Jewish public, along with
secular education.
people in responsible positions
JOSHUA S. GELLER

Dr. Priver to Address
Physicians on Israel

Diabetics Plan Dinner

will deliver a report on "A Recent
Hospital Study Tour of Israel"
7 8:30 p.m., May
18 at the home
of Dr. Alexander
Frie dlaen-
der, 8530 Lin-
coln, Huntington
Woods.
Detroit Chap-
ter of American
Physicians Fel-
lowship for the
Israel Medical
Association i s
sponsoring t h e
evening. Dr.
Bernard Weston
Dr. Priver
chairman, in-
vites all Detroit physicians and
their wives. For information on
the group, which helps practicing
physicians in Israel, call Dr. Wes-
ton, 342-5359.

the McGregor Memorial Building.
Dr. George F. Cahill Jr. of the Jos-
lin Clinic, Boston, will be guest
speaker. Dr. Herschel A. Shulman
is program chairman.

Just a small
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Dr. Julien Priver, executive
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1

BNAI MOSHE MEN'S CLUB
reelected Ben Kahn president at
its annual m e e t i n g. David
Schwartz and Simon Goldman
were reelected vice presidents and
Sidney Ferst elected third vice
president. Other officers are Rob-
ert Hirshbein, treasurer; Melvin
Slovin. and Sidney Burk, secre-
taries; and Sidney Nickin, ser-
geant at arms. Irving Bernstein,
Leonard Greenbaum, Herman
Roth. Marcel Thirman, Adalbert
Dan, Sam liVohl and David Bern-
stein were elected board members.
Holdovers are Victor Friedman,
Samuel Haber, Dr. Jerome Lech-
ner, William Morin, Abe Paster-
nak, Carl Rozner, Charles Ruben
and Harry Schwartz.
* * *
MOSAIC LODGE F&AM will
honor its immediate past master,
Douglas A. Purther, at a Past Mas-
ters' Night dinner-dance 7 p.m.
May 16 at the L atin Quarter.
The program will feature comic
Van Harris, singer Dina Clare
and concert violinist Sashm Tor-
mas. For reservations, contact
Aaron Katzman, 14251 West 9
Mile, Oak Park, no later than Wed-
nesday. * * *
AESCULAPIAN PHARMACEU-
TICAL ASSOCIATION will hold
its annual drug shower, 9 p.m.
Monday at the Jewish Home for the
Aged. Refreshments will be served
at the social.

* * *

BNAI DAVID MEN'S CLUB will
have its annual election dinner,
7 p.m. Thursday at the Synagogue.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, May 7, 1965-17

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