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April 16, 1965 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Arab-Israel Peace Organization Gets
Under Way Throu gh Sabra's Efforts

A grass-roots peace organization
has been sown in the troubled soil
of the Middle East through the
efforts of an Israeli woman.
Nina De-Nur is the wife of the
internationally known writer whose
novel "House of Dolls" was pub-
lished in 22 languages under the

Hebrew Corner

Academicians'
Employment

Haim Schiff Is an academician who
completed his studies in the United
States of America and wishes to con-
tribute his expertise in his profession
to the State of Israel, either for a few
years or permanently. What should he
do?
If he resides abroad and is an Israeli,
he should apply to the Israel Acade-
micians' Bureau in New York, where he
can obtain all the necessary information.
There they will put him in contact with
industries and institutions in Israel
where his services are required.
Shemuel Gross, a recent immigrant
holding an academic degree, is looking
for work in his profession. He need not
do so himself. He should turn to the
PATWA Office of the Jewish Agency in
his place of residence, and they will
look for employment for him through
the Academicians' Bureau in Israel.
As a part of the Employment Service
established under a law passed by the
Renesset in 1959, an Academicians'
Bureau was opened to serve the general
public, both in Israel and in other coun-
tries. It has information on the prospects
for employment of academicians, and
also advises about accommodation, hous-
ing, customs duties and loans. The
Bureau maintains contact with employers
through its branches in the various
towns of the country.
An academician who is unemployed
applies to one of the branches of the
Academicians' Bureau in the country. He
is then referred to the place of work
and the job where he is needed. The
Bureau also has branches abroad. in the
United States and in Western Europe,
which are. in direct touch with academi-
cians wishing to return to Israel.
All the branches abroad irssess infor-
mation required by academicians about
conditions of work in Israel, where their
services are needed, and, of course,
about salaries, accommodation, customs
duties, etc.
All services to academicians are given
free of charge, as a government public
service.
The Academicians' Bureau serves as
a center for all their problems. The
Bureau suggests places of work and
maintains a list of places which require
academicians.
(Published by the Brit Ivrit Olamit)
Foundation of Hebrew Column
Jerusalem

n'kvi nr:T x

pseudonym Ka-tzetnik 135633, the
concentration camp number ta-
tooed on his left arm.
A third-generation "sabra", or
native, Mrs. De-Nur and her hus-
band for two years have hosted
social evenings in their home for
both Jews and Arabs. Out of this
has come the unnamed "Active
Peace Project" to work toward
active understanding between the
two communities, first in Israel
and then throughout the Middle
East. Both sides have elected
representatives on the new
formed Arab-Jewish Central Com-
mittee.
One of the first projects agreed
upon by the committee was
establishment of a Middle East
Peace Research Institute to fer-
ret out areas of tension in Israel
and their solution through scien-
tific research.
The Israeli Arab community
constitutes some 10 per cent of
the population; 74 per cent of them
under 30 years old. Mrs. De-Nur
hopes her organization will prove
to be the "roof body"—nonparti-
san, nonpolitical and all-inclusive
—which will bring about the de-
velopment of active understanding
through full integration.
There is a precedent for such
cooperation in Haifa: the Palinsky
Arab - Jewish Community Center,
the result of a $50,000 contribution
of New York philanthropist Mrs.
Pauline Palinsky. It was given
through the Israel-American Foun-
dation to Haifa Mayor Abba
K h o u s h y, and is maintained
through government funds.
Mrs. De-Nur hopes to encourage
an American- Jewish "Peace
Corps," whereby young people will
work in Jewish settlements and
Arab villages, bringing their pro-
fessional know-how to the under-
privileged.

r.

11





• T

I
T • •••

Editor's Note: Elie Wiesel is the author
of "Night," "Dawn," "The Accident"
and "The Town Beyond the Wall."

I frankly confess that when I
read the first press reports about an
atheist rabbi, my initial reaction
was not one of anger but of sym-
pathy.
The idea of a spiritual leader
declaring war on the ribono shel
olem, on God, out of a clear sky
and from the pulpit of a synagogue
to boot, rather intrigued me. Now
finally the wrath of our generation
has also penetrated religious pre-
cincts. I thought. There had risen
many tormented writers. angry
poets and agonized artists; only an
angry rabbi was lacking and now
the rabbi from Detroit would be
the one.
Why not? We Jews, more than
all other people of the world have
reason, nay, the duty, to be angry
about man and his fate, about crea-
tion and the creator. Our betrayal
has been universal, even cosmic.
All gates were shilt tight to us, and
all eyes full of daggers. It is
natural therefore to have expected
a mighty outcry of protest against
history by the Jewish historian, by
the Jewish thinker against the very
thought process and by the Jewish
believer against religion itself.
* '5 C
To a certain extent—and this is
not the place to pause for greater
detail — the voice of the outcry
among non-Jews has been louder
and clearer than among Jews. In
vain will you seek wrath among
most of the American - Jewish
writers; in vain will you find a
propheic note that strikes the
proper chord, the proper trope, on
the events of yesterday's and to-
day's times.
And so it was that I was pleased
to read that somewhere in Detroit
a rabbi had risen in rebellion
against God's ways, against God's

tions emerged in painting and in
literature, but not in the area of
religious thinking. Only a scant
number of individuals reacted with
religious consciousness, with reli-
gious sensitivity. There have been
instances of intensely religious peo-
ple who ceased to believe out of
sheer protest, and also of apikor-
sim, unbelievers, who turned to be-
lieving out of protest. Under the
impact of the catastrophe they
could not remain what they were
before. Whether they had been in
Treblinka or not, something had
died in them, in their views of the
world. With one it was atheism
and with another belief.
That is why I was sympathetic
to the declaration of war which the
rabbi of Detroit served on God, in
whose very service he had been
harnessed until now.
However, when I read more de-
tailed reports of his revolt, I was
disappointed. His revolt was no up-
rising at all—merely a play on
words. Instead of triggering unrest,
it provoked laughter and instead
of serving as a guide to truth-seek-
ers it has become a theme for
humorists.
C * *
It is the season of Passover now,
when we have read the Hagadah
and learned to know that what dis-
tinguishes the Four Sons is the
manner in which they express them-
selves. They all ask the question,
differing only in style, in tone and
in intention.
Had the rabbi of Detroit cried
out in the synagogue that "the God
of Abraham, of Isaac and of Jacob
is also the God of Auschwitz and
Treblinka and I can no longer
praise nor serve him," many hearts
would have shaken in tremor. And
his anger and his questioning
would have sounded genuinely
authentic, for they would have I

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For to quarrell with the ribono
shel olern is entirely Jewish, just
as it is truly Jewish to accept the
Divine gzar din, the decree of pain
and agony, and of punishment.
Neither Jeremiah the prophet,
nor Job feared to come with griev-
ances against the Almighty. Nor
Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev. Still
later there were to be pious Jews
who dared sit in judgment over the
Judge of all judges.
* * *
It is being told that three Jewish
sages in one of the Nazi concen-
tration camps once decided to form
themselves into a Beth Din, court
of law, and summon the Almighty
to a Din Torah, to trial, where he
could defend himself for permit-
ting so many of his children to
perish on the akaida, the sacrificial
altar. The strange Beth Din took
testimony from witnesses pro and
con and listened in full gravity to
the summations of the prosecution
and the defense. The trial was con-
ducted in full conformity with the
laws of the Torah which, according
to our sages, are equally binding on
the Lord. The judges then an-
nounced the verdict.
It is not important what the ver-
dict was or whether it was carried
out. What is important is that that
in the very shadow of the flames
there had been God-fearing Jews
who demanded an answer from
God with broken hearts.
• • •
I thought that the young, defiant,
rebellious rabbi was striving to go
in their footsteps, and I was pre-
pared to applaud him for it.
The holocaust, it had been ex-
pected, would bring a wide breach
in all facets of human searching, in-
cluding religion. Unfortunately,
this did not happen. New art direc-

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
18—Friday, April 16, 1965

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issued from a tormented soul.
Instead, he chose another way, a
non-Jewish way. He lost his faith
not because of Auschwitz but, in
his own words, as a result of un-
ripe so-called philosophical motiva-
tions. Because he could find no
proof that God existed, he no
longer believes in him. Should he
discover the proof tomorrow, he
will believe anew. He seemed to
forget that his approach is now
antiquated. To a person of this
generation the question of God's
existence is no longer a theological
but purely moral problem. Words
too have fallen victim to the holo-
caust. Whoever seeks to build his
world outlook on mere words has
completely failed to grasp the
meaning of the events of our
generation.
The rabbi's atheism is infantile.
Whether he mentions or not God's
name in the Hagadah isn't of the
slightest interest to anyone. His
anti ani-maamin (article of faith)
has no relevance to the sense of
protest every believing Jew and
non-Jew must carry inside of him-
self like an open wound.
We are deserving of another kind
of atheism, of another brand of
apikorsim.

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On Jewish Atheists

By ELIE WIESEL
Seven Arts Feature Syndicate

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