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March 26, 1965 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1965-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Kiev Jews Denied Permit to Bake
Matzo for Passover, Report Confirms

NEW YORK (JTA) — Leaders
of the Jewish community in Kiev
have confirmed reports that the
synagogue in that Soviet city was
refused permission to bake matzo
for Passover, according to a cable
from Moscow to the New York
Times.
The confirmation of the reports
by the Kiev Jews contradicted a
claim made earlier this week by
Dimitri Chavakhin, Soviet ambas-
sador to Israel, who denied that
there was any matzo ban in Kiev.
The Soviet envoy made this claim
during a conversation with Israeli
Chief Rabbi Isser Yehuda Unter-
man.

the British Broadcasting Corp. re-
ported that while Jews in Moscow
and Leningrad apparently would
be able to get matzo this year,
other scattered communities were
unlikely to get enough matzo for
Passover "if indeed they get them
at all."
Despite recent claims of ade-
quate matzo baking facilities this
year in Moscow and Leningrad, in-
formed sources in London reported
that generally, there is still no or-
ganized matzo baking in those
cities and each individual must
bring his own flour.
The sources noted that baking
has so far been permitted only at
three ovens in three synagogues
in the Moscow area and one in
Leningrad.
They noted that while the Soviet
authorities had recently shown
foreign correspondents the ovens
in Moscow where matzo baking
was being carried out, no such
facilities had been shown to cor-
respondents in Kiev. They voiced
the hope that the matzo ban would
be rescinded throughout the Soviet
Union.
The Board of Deputies of British
Jews decided to convene a con-
ference of various Jewish organi-
zations to discuss the posit?on of
Soviet Jewry. The meeting will be
held April 8.
Meanwhile world protests against
Soviet treatment of the Jews con-
tinued this week.
In St. Louis, major Jewish lay
and religious organizations and in-
stitutions sponsored a , protest
meeting Sunday.
Among those attending the gath-
ering were prominent civic lead-
ers, Catholic and Protestant clergy-
men and educators and personali-
ties in all walks of life. Guest
speaker at the meeting was Philip
M. Klutznick, • honorary president
of Bnai Brith and a former mem-
ber of the United States delegation
to the United Nations.
In Mexico City. an appeal to the
world's conscience to join in pro-
testing against anti-Jewish discrim-
inations in the Soviet Union was
issued by the Front for Human

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NEW YORK (JTA) — Showman
Billy Rose's collection of 105 pieces
of sculpture, which he has donated
to the National Museum of Israel
in Jerusalem, is being shipped to
Israel.
The collection, valued at more
than $1,000,000, will be housed in
the Billy Rose Art Gardens at the
Museum, which will be opened
May 11.
Rose, who began his collection
about 25 years ago, said he had
decided to give it to Israel "because

Rights, under the signature of a
leading Mexican attorney, Benja-
min Laureano Luna.
In a two-page statement in its
monthly journal, Impacto, the or-
ganization blamed the USSR gov-
ernment directly for the discrim-
ination practiced in the Soviet
Union in regard to religious and
cultural rights of Russian Jewry.
A statement calling - upon all
governments to defend human
rights in general was issued in the
daily newspaper, Excelsior, by Raul
Carranca y Trujillo, one of the
most prominent Mexican jurists.
He called on all governments to
adopt strict legislation forbidding
violations against human rights.

According to the Times, the
* * *
Kiev Jewish leaders said that
they had requested permission Ilya Ehrenburg Tells
to bake matzo in January and
that it had been refused. The of Appeal to Stalin
Times report added, however, to Probe Persecutions
that "semiofficial" courses said
LONDON (JTA) — Ilya Ehren-
that some matzo baking was go-
ing,on under the auspices of the burg, famous Soviet novelistjour-
only synagogue in Kiev, which nalist, has revealed that he had
personally appealed to Stalin, dur-
has a Jewish population of 300.-
ing the latter's regime, to investi-
000.
gate the persecutions being carried
The Moscow corresporident of

DRAPERIES

Carol Sue Rose to Wed Billy Rose Collection of Sculpture
Peter Trepeck in June on Way to National Museum of Israel

on, from 1948 to 1952, against. Sov-
iet Jewish intellectuals, according
to a Moscow dispatch. He did not
reveal what, if anything, Stalin had
replied.
Continuing his memoirs in the
Russian literary magazine, Novy
Mir, Ehrenburg devoted several
pages of his latest installment to
the Jewish question. He detailed
again the purge of the Jewish in-
tellectuals, beginning with the
murder of actor-director Solomon
Michoels, in 1948, and continuing
with the execution of other lead-
ing Jewish intellectuals.
He himself expected "the ring-
ing of the bell," meaning arrest
and possible execution, he report-
ed. Finally, he wrote, he appealed
to Stalin against the anti-Jewish
actions by the Soviet authorities.
* * *

Megillah Reading Draws
1,000 Moscow Worshipers

NEW YORK (JTA)—The read-
ing of the megillah in the Central
Synagogue in Moscow on March
17, attracted more than 1,000 wor-
shiperS, among them a large num-
ber of young people, according to
information reaching here from
reliable sources.
There has never been as many
young Jews in the synagogue for a
Purim service as there was this
year, the Moscow report said.

`Portrait of a People'
Out in 3 Volumes

Commemorating the 17th anni-
versary of U. S recognition of the
Free State of Israel, Judaica Press,
New York, will publish "Portraits
of a People," a three-volume history
of the Jews from ancient to modern
times, by Charles Raddock. The
author, former editor of the Jew-
ish Forum, is a working newspaper-
man and UN correspondent.
His trilogy of the Jewish people
begins with the Middle Bronze
Age, era of Abraham of Ur, tradi-
tionally regarded as the "first
`Jew" and ends with the 21st Roman
Catholic Ecumenical Council which,
last November, took preliminary
action to clear the Jews of "dei-
cide."
According to Judacia Press, the
newsman-historian was moved to
undertake so ambitious a project
as a "global history spanning 38
centuries and six continents" after
UNESCO (United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization) had failed to earmark
unilateral space for the "whole
Jewish story" in its own History
of Mankind plan, a project design-
ed to cover all nations.
"Portrait of a People" is the
sec ond multi-volume publishing
venture of Judaica Press, whose
first was a seven-volume English
rendition of the Mishnah, 2nd-
century classic held by Jews as
next in importance to the Bible.

it is hungrier for culture than any
other country in the world."
He said he also planned to leave
to Israel a collection of 20 paint-
ings, if he finds that Israel is in-
terested in 18th Century painters,
including Gainsborough, Turner,
Romney and Reynolds.

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1VIISS CAROL SUE ROSE

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Rose of
Cambridge Rd. announce the en-
gagement of their daughter Carol
Sue to Peter J. Trepeck, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Trepeck of
Huntington Rd., Huntington Woods.
A June wedding is planned.

Brandeis U. Study
Nullifies Popular
View of Integration

WALTHAM, Mass. — Residential
integration in Boston will be ac-
complished if white couples move
into rehabilitated houses or new
apartments being erected in the
city's Washington Park urban re-
newal area, a two-year Brandeis
University study of middle-income
Negro families in Roxbury con-
cludes.
The study, contained in a 100-
page booklet, "The Middle-Income
. Negro Family Faces Urban Re-
newal," also disagrees with the
popular view that integration will
be accomplished by an opposite
pattern—the movement of Negroes
to the suburbs.
In addition, the report states
that Boston's middle-income Ne-
groes do not have free choice in
the selection of houses and that
rentals in the city are often subtly
denied to them, but if they want
to buy there is a reasonable selec-
tion of suburban houses available.
Conversely, h o w e v e r, the re-
searchers report that most Negroes
did not want to move to the sub-
urbs. In this respect, the research
team concluded that instead of
Negro and white families eventual-
ly living side by side in the sub-
urbs, it appears they will be liv-
ing next to each other in city
apartments.
Cheap rent and the fact that the
community is about to be "physi-
cally restored and its social climate
reformed" were the main reasons
given by the Negroes for remain-
ing in their present housing aeas.
The project was conducted by
sociologists and social workers
from Brandeis' Florence Heller
Graduate School for Advanced
Studies in Social Welfare.

"Jewish Youth — Jewish Identi-
fication," a discussion of the spe-
cial needs and problems of youth
growing up in the Jewish commun-
ity, will be the topic of a panel
discussion 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at
Cong. Beth Shalom.
Speakers will be Rabbi Mordecai
Halpern; Leonard Antel, assistant
junior high school principal and
farmer counselor; and Bernard
Jaffe, assistant principal and Unit-
ed Synagogue South regional di-
rector.

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`Anyone Can Whistle':
Book Most Entertaining

When the printed book of a play
holds the reader's interest and en-
tertains in print as well as it does
on the stage, it can be acclaimed
a true success.
This is the case with "Anyone
Can Whistle," book by Arthur
•L a u r e nt s, music and lyrics by
Stephen Sondheim, published by
Random House.
This play has all the elements of
good entertainment, and the book
is so well prepared for the stage
production that it has merits as
good and pleasure-giving literature.
The play had its first presenta-
tion at the Majestic Theater in New
York on April 4, 1964.

It is Laurents' seventh Broadway
production. His play "Time of the

Cuckoo" was adapted for the
screen under the title "Summer-
time" and starred Katharine Hep-
burn.
Sondheim's Broadway debut was
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS as lyricist with "West Side Story,"
Friday, March 26, 1965-29 and his other success, was "Gypsy."

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